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  #16
Old 25-06-2012

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The South Canterbury Museum's focus was the history of the region, and in line with that, the museum did have a tank of inanga. They were among the hardy of all fresh water fish, tolerating temperatures of up to 25deg C.
Bit off-topic but have I missed something here or is there a typo? 25°C is hardly a remarkable temperature for a fish..! Temperature variations, maybe?
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  #17
Old 25-06-2012

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Originally Posted by Maguari View Post
Bit off-topic but have I missed something here or is there a typo? 25°C is hardly a remarkable temperature for a fish..! Temperature variations, maybe?
I think he was meaning New Zealand freshwater fish rather than freshwater fish in general. Most NZ native fish can't tolerate high temperatures very well but inanga can be kept at higher than most. There have been quite a lot of studies done on inanga because their young (whitebait) are important culturally. The preferred temperature of the species has been shown to be about 20°C but they can take it up as high as 26°C. It's not a temperature you would intentionally keep them at however because they are then under a state of stress and become more susceptible to disease and other problems.
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  #18
Old 25-06-2012

I am amazed: NZ authorities allow importing bird eating spiders, but denied it for (even non venomous) snakes??! Hmh, couldn't be the warm and humid environment of NZ cities and/or the Top Northern parts of NZ a good habitat for escaped bird eating spiders too? And is population control of bird eating spiders easier then the one of snakes?...
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  #19
Old 25-06-2012

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Originally Posted by PAT View Post
Both Melbourne Zoo and Melbourne Museum have small collections of a few different species. I can't remember which of the top of my head. The Museum has a bit of information about quarantine and I think that theirs (and possibly the zoos) were saved after being imported illegally.
from 2010:
Exotic tarantulas: Museum Victoria
Quote:
The species of live exotic tarantulas we have at the moment include the Goliath, Sri Lankan Ornamental, Brazilian Salmon Pink, Mexican Red-rumped, Sun-tiger, Giant White Knee, King Baboon and Cobalt Blue.
I guess you need to get to Melbourne Jarkari!!

This article is from 2012:
MV Blog: Museum Victoria
Quote:
Melbourne Museum is home two quarantine rooms where we house 14 tarantulas that were confiscated by AQIS.

One quarantine room at the museum is located within the Bugs Alive! gallery and allows visitors to see its inner workings through a glass viewing wall, while the other room is located behind the scenes.

Our display spiders are fed every fortnight on Saturdays. One of our 'behind the scenes' spiders is fed weekly on Fridays at 3pm live on the web.

Currently on display via the webcam is a Brazilian Salmon Pink tarantula (Lasiodora parahybana). Brazilian Salmon Pinks are the third largest species of tarantula with a leg span reaching 25cm.
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  #20
Old 25-06-2012

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Originally Posted by zoomaniac
I am amazed: NZ authorities allow importing bird eating spiders, but denied it for (even non venomous) snakes??! Hmh, couldn't be the warm and humid environment of NZ cities and/or the Top Northern parts of NZ a good habitat for escaped bird eating spiders too? And is population control of bird eating spiders easier then the one of snakes?...
NZ cities are neither warm nor humid. Generally speaking, NZers don't heat buildings the way Europeans do. We are too tough

There's really no way any of the importable species could survive in the wild in NZ, even in the far north. But yes it is a bit silly that tarantulas (and the two species of scorpion which are also on the allowed list!!) can be brought into the country for zoos but not a single male non-venomous tropical snake can be. But that's the way it is.
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  #21
Old 25-06-2012

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Originally Posted by Chlidonias View Post
NZ cities are neither warm nor humid. Generally speaking, NZers don't heat buildings the way Europeans do. We are too tough .
Okay, I don't wanna mess with you guys. (I just thought it must be at least humid because of a clima chart in the internet and a friend of mine who was visiting NZ many times for a couple of weeks and it was ALLWAYS raining).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chlidonias View Post
There's really no way any of the importable species could survive in the wild in NZ, even in the far north. But yes it is a bit silly that tarantulas (and the two species of scorpion which are also on the allowed list!!) can be brought into the country for zoos but not a single male non-venomous tropical snake can be. But that's the way it is.
If anything goes wrong, we shouldn't take that as a kismet, should we? (Specially when we are as tough as Newzealandians)
I like to mention, that this is not a NZ bashing, it is just against some - hmh, lets say: weird - decisions of authorities (as we have had recently in Switzerland by stopping the import of dolphins for example. And we have just one (1!) dolphinarium/dolphin lagoon in an amusement park).
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  #22
Old 25-06-2012

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Originally Posted by Chlidonias View Post
I think he was meaning New Zealand freshwater fish rather than freshwater fish in general. Most NZ native fish can't tolerate high temperatures very well but inanga can be kept at higher than most. There have been quite a lot of studies done on inanga because their young (whitebait) are important culturally. The preferred temperature of the species has been shown to be about 20°C but they can take it up as high as 26°C. It's not a temperature you would intentionally keep them at however because they are then under a state of stress and become more susceptible to disease and other problems.
Ah, that makes sense. Just struck me as odd!
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  #23
Old 25-06-2012

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Originally Posted by Chlidonias
There's really no way any of the importable species could survive in the wild in NZ, even in the far north.
I should rephrase that I think. Individual tarantulas could actually survive quite well in the wild over the summer in many parts of NZ, but they couldn't establish a population because the winters are too cold, even in the far north.
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  #24
Old 26-06-2012

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Originally Posted by zooboy28
Species Imported 2012:

-Chilean Rose Tarantula (Wellington Zoo)
-King Baboon Tarantula (Wellington Zoo)
-?
-?
-?
-?
its been almost 24 hours since the zoo answered this on facebook (took their time about it though!!) so I'm just going to add it here now:
Quote:
the new ones are a variety of Peruvian Pinktoe, Peruvian Striped Leg, Bolivian Blue Leg, Chilean Rose, King Baboon, and Brazilian Black. We will be getting some Mexican Redknee soon as well. We already had a Goliath Birdeater, Chilean Rose and Peruvian Pinktoe.
...which are these ones (in bold) from the approved list (I'm also including the Costa Rica zebra tarantula for good measure, because Butterfly Creek has that species on display already):

Aphonopelma moderatum (Rio Grande gold tarantula)
Aphonopelma seemanni (Costa Rica zebra tarantula)
Avicularia urticans (Peruvian pink toe tarantula)
Brachypelma smithii (Mexican red knee tarantula)
Citharischius crawshayi (king baboon tarantula)
Grammostola pulchra (Brazilian black tarantula)
Grammostola rosea (Chilean rose hair tarantula) [Chilean rose]

Lasiodorides polycuspulatus (Peruvian blonde tarantula)
Lasiodorides striatus (Peruvian orange stripe tarantula) [Peruvian striped leg]
Pamphobetus antinous (steely blue-leg bird-eating spider) [Bolivian blue leg]

Pamphobetus platytomma (Brazilian pink tarantula)
Theraphosa blondi (Goliath bird-eating spider)

I have to say that, apart for the Mexican red-kneed tarantula, the most attractive species on the list are the ones that aren't in the import!!
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  #25
Old 26-06-2012

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Originally Posted by Chlidonias View Post
its been almost 24 hours since the zoo answered this on facebook (took their time about it though!!) so I'm just going to add it here now:
Fair enuf, I been flat out with work, and forgot to check. Can't edit the first post know either to complete the species lists, perhaps a mod could do this when they get a chance?
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  #26
Old 01-07-2012

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Originally Posted by Chlidonias View Post
I should rephrase that I think. Individual tarantulas could actually survive quite well in the wild over the summer in many parts of NZ, but they couldn't establish a population because the winters are too cold, even in the far north.
Does anybody know of a case of bird-eaters establishing a breeding population outside their natural range?
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  #27
Old 01-07-2012

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Originally Posted by tetrapod
Does anybody know of a case of bird-eaters establishing a breeding population outside their natural range?
this link http://www.freshfromflorida.com/pi/e...oticstable.pdf and others say the Mexican red rump tarantula Brachypelma vagans is established in Florida.

Apparently Avicularia avicularia is also established in the Everglades.
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  #28
Old 01-07-2012

If I am correct, Australia is only allowed to import females and have to be displayed and housed with something like two layers of glass. I guess New Zealand is the place to go to see exotic spiders in this region.
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  #29
Old 01-07-2012

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Originally Posted by Jabiru96 View Post
If I am correct, Australia is only allowed to import females and have to be displayed and housed with something like two layers of glass. I guess New Zealand is the place to go to see exotic spiders in this region.
Only a handful of species, non pregnant females and can only be kept by "high securitt facilities" only. worth a trip to nz me thinks.
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  #30
Old 20-07-2012

New Article from Orana Park:

Quote:
Orana Wildlife Park’s Native Fauna Keepers are thrilled to be working with the Park’s latest new specimens - six sub-adult tarantulas. The spiders, too young to be sexed, arrived last week and have settled in nicely. Orana holds two animals representing each of the Chilean Rose, Brazilian Black and Andean Stripe Knee species of tarantula which were transferred from England. Later in the year, four Mexican Red Knee spiderlings will also arrive at the Park.

Head Keeper of Native Fauna, Alyssa Salton, says: “We are very excited to have the opportunity to work with such amazing animals. This is the first time that large spiders have been held at Orana.

Tarantulas are fascinating animals with amazing features. They moult their entire exoskeleton which is fairly impressive! Males have hooks on their legs and if they lose a leg a new one starts to grow when they moult. Unfortunately people often seem to be fearful of them and we hope to change that perception. I actually think they are quite cute. We have named them Marvin, Rose (Chilean), Betsy, Borris (Brazilian), Gingy and Flicky (Andean Stripe).

The spiders are housed in terrariums within the Park’s Conservation Centre (not on public display) meaning it will be some time before Park visitors can view the animals. The reason is that Wellington Zoo arranged the transfer of the tarantulas and offered Orana the chance to acquire some specimens. Naturally, we could not turn down such a wonderful opportunity but as this was not a planned new species, a display habitat now needs to be built.

Prior to the arrival of the spiders, we consulted extensively with local experts, visited their tarantula exhibits and have learned a great deal about the spiders and their requirements. I am delighted that Park staff have all been absolutely intrigued by the animals, even those who are not so keen on spiders have taken a huge interest in them. I am sure visitors will really enjoy seeing them once we have built a display exhibit for the animals”. concludes Alyssa.
The Andean Stripe Knee wasn't mentioned previously, was it?
 


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