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kc7gr

Barn Owl, and how NOT to hold a raptor!

Granted, it's a good enough photo, but I'm posting it mainly as a warning to others who may be contemplating working with raptors. Two major problems here. First, see how the handler is holding the jesses? Between the thumb and palm? BAD idea! The jesses need to be going between the second and third fingers. That way, when you close your hand as you normally would when manning a bird, there's no way said bird is going anywhere if you don't want them to. Second: Note how the leash is coiled? And, most importantly, not tied off to the glove's D-ring? Just as bad, if not worse. If the handler should have a fainting spell, or even trip over something and lose their grip, this bird would be gone in a heartbeat WITH the leash attached! If a full-flighted raptor gets loose with their leash attached, they are as good as dead. Period. Unless you can somehow recover them before they end up dangling upside down, leash caught in some obstruction, they're history. Given it takes a few minutes, worst case, to learn a falconer's knot there is simply no excuse for such carelessness. Any time you're manning a bird, no matter if they're full flighted or missing both wings, TIE OFF! It's a habit which could save an avian life.

Barn Owl, and how NOT to hold a raptor!
kc7gr, 13 Dec 2009
    • kc7gr
      Granted, it\'s a good enough photo, but I\'m posting it mainly as a warning to others who may be contemplating working with raptors.

      Two major problems here. First, see how the handler is holding the jesses? Between the thumb and palm? BAD idea! The jesses need to be going between the second and third fingers. That way, when you close your hand as you normally would when manning a bird, there\'s no way said bird is going anywhere if you don\'t want them to.

      Second: Note how the leash is coiled? And, most importantly, not tied off to the glove\'s D-ring? Just as bad, if not worse. If the handler should have a fainting spell, or even trip over something and lose their grip, this bird would be gone in a heartbeat WITH the leash attached!

      If a full-flighted raptor gets loose with their leash attached, they are as good as dead. Period. Unless you can somehow recover them before they end up dangling upside down, leash caught in some obstruction, they\'re history.

      Given it takes a few minutes, worst case, to learn a falconer\'s knot there is simply no excuse for such carelessness. Any time you\'re manning a bird, no matter if they\'re full flighted or missing both wings, TIE OFF! It\'s a habit which could save an avian life.
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  • Category:
    Santa Ana Zoo at Prentice Park
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    kc7gr
    Date:
    13 Dec 2009
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