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Zooish

Great Rift Valley of Ethiopia exhibit

The BIGGEST mock-rock project ever undertaken at the Singapore Zoo. The area covers 1 hectare.

Great Rift Valley of Ethiopia exhibit
Zooish, 9 Jan 2007
David Matos Mendes likes this.
    • Zooish
      The BIGGEST mock-rock project ever undertaken at the Singapore Zoo. The area covers 1 hectare.
    • patrick
      this exhibit looks great! even the mock-rockwork looks well done. my biggest issue with mick rock is that 90% of zoos do exactly the same style and shape of rock with little effort into matching shape, formation and colour of any partcular kinds of rock in the aniamsl natural habitat. clearly singapore has done something different here and i like it....
    • Zooish
      Indeed, the landscaping contractors hired for this project did a phenomenal job. The landscape architects actually made a field trip to Ethiopia to study the geology as well as take moulds of the actual rocks there and used those moulds to cast the mock rock in the exhibit.

      I guess the generic look seen in the mock rocks of some zoos stem from the use of similar casting moulds. It's probably cheaper to reuse the same moulds over and over.
      Wyman likes this.
    • MARK
      This exhibit does look good, the thumbs up I say.
    • Xerxes
      Very cool exhibit !

      What kind of animals does I contain ? I recognize some baboons, but are there others too ?
    • Zooish
      The main exhibit is home to 80+ hamadryas baboons. On the cliff at the back (right side of the photo) live a herd of Nubian ibex.
      Smaller exhibits house black-backed jackal, banded mongoose, rock hyrax, saddle-billed stork, spur-thighed tortoise and pygmy goats.
      Wyman likes this.
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  • Category:
    Singapore Zoo
    Uploaded By:
    Zooish
    Date:
    9 Jan 2007
    View Count:
    2,621
    Comment Count:
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