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9 species of mammals, 9 species of birds, 9 species of reptiles. Your choice?

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by Nikola Chavkosk, 17 Feb 2016.

  1. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Yes, most of the genus is. My male A. lubricus lubricus illustrates this nicely...
     
  2. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Yours as in private or in a zoo collection?
     
  3. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Well, it’s one of a few animals I currently keep-including some other species/genera on your list.
     
  4. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Just abt all species I saw on dealers lists in the past year or two, maybe why. Easy to obtain surely compared to kagus and co.
     
  5. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Depends on what you consider as “easy“ if you want to keep them well.
    Walsrode actually offered some of their surplus kagu males to private keepers a couple of years ago. And the most prolific kagu breeding takes place in a private collection in France...
     
  6. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    They breed quite well in captivity apparently, back when they were more common in captive hands.
     
  7. littlewallaby

    littlewallaby Active Member

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    Ok, based only on (some) animals that would be easily obtainable and sustainable in a small personal zoo...I'm gonna give this a shot. (I have experience with a few exotic animals but nothing fancy, so I'm gonna try to keep this simple. I'm also thinking of this hypothetically of course and not based on the means and skills I currently have.) I tried to stick to animals I know can be kept as pets in the U.S., but some I'm not sure about. Nonetheless I believe everything here is fairly easy to sustain in captivity? I may need some help with this one, lol.)

    The 9 Mammals
    Capybara
    Red Fox
    Wallaby
    Meerkat (not really obtainable, but if so I'd replace it with naked mole rats which I believe are)
    Reindeer
    Sea Otter (little on the fence with that one cause I'm not sure it'd be possible to provide the adequate environment in a private zoo. I suppose if you had the money to build an enclosure with seawater. Actually I feel the same way about the meerkats.)
    Golden Lion Tamarin

    The 9 Birds
    Scarlet Macaw
    Canadian Goose
    Flamingo
    Finch (any species)
    Emu
    Spoonbill
    Peacock

    The 9 Reptiles
    (Gonna break a rule here) Amazon Milk Frog
    Bearded Dragon
    Tortoise (any easily obtainable species)
    Corn Snake (in various morphs/colors)
    Dwarf Caiman
    Anole
    Tegu
    (And another) Salamander, any species.
     
  8. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Sea otters and Golden Lion Tamarins are not easily obtainable; meerkats are, at least in most 1st world countries.

    Wallaby = any macropod smaller than a kangaroo. Which ranges from easily to obtain species such as the Red-necked wallaby to pretty much legally unobtainable species such as the monjon.
    Similarily, not all finches, reindeer, flamingoes etc. are easily obtainable...;)
     
  9. littlewallaby

    littlewallaby Active Member

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    THANK YOU. I knew I was cutting it close. Like I said, some of these I knew weren't entirely feasible (didn't really feel the need to specify each and every one but you get the picture). Others I wasn't sure. I remember reading somewhere that the Tamarins were a commonly kept pet (in the monkey keeping world, I personally would never want to own any monkey/ape/primate of any kind...or work with them in a zoo for that matter) but it was one of those list articles.

    I had no idea about the meerkats. I have never heard of any being kept as pets, so that's pretty interesting.
     
  10. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    GLTs were popular pets several decades ago-which was one of the reasons for the native population decline and the consequent increased protection efforts. Nowadays, Golden-headed lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) are quite common in the exotic pet trade.
    Meerkats have become a standard species even in smaller collections, so it’s no surprise that they also pop up in the exotic pet trade. I saw a pair offered on FB just the other week. Friends of mine even showed me photos of pet meerkats in Tokyo on leashes and dressed up as Pokemon...
     
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  11. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Yes meerkats are easy and a fad was started in the UK by some television adverts.
     
  12. Kakapo

    Kakapo Well-Known Member

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    Actually meerkats are much more easilty obtainable than naked mole rats. I've seen ever a meerkat for sale in a pet shop a couple of years ago. Also they're one of the easiest mammals to keep, they don't need special environment on their enclosure.
     
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  13. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    I somehow disagree: yes, meerkats are easier to keep than, say, numbats or silky anteaters. However, they are highly social, active little tropical predators. Large, well structured and escape-proof enclosures with adequate heating elements, a diverse diet, a solid group management, constant behavioral enrichment etc. are key elements for their successful husbandry according to modern standards. I have seen quite a bunch of meerkat enclosures worldwide, but only a few good ones.
    Due to increased reproductivity in the recent years, some zoos have begun to offer surplus naked mole rats to interested private keepers. Their husbandry, however, also requires certain parameters that are not very cheap to reproduce and maintain (temperature and humidity, functiong social groups etc.).
     
  14. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Handreared meerkats, palm civets etc would be ideal for meeting the public.
     
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  15. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Handrearing animals just for the sake of having tame specimens isn’t considered to be part of modern zoo husbandry. At least not in Europe.
     
  16. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    But its a great way to have the public interact with animals: look at kids when they meet an otter or a meerkat for the first time.
     
  17. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    What is more important: human selfishness or animal welfare? For me, it’s the latter. If you want to showcase individual animals, medical training might be a way better option for both the animals, staff and the interested public-without creating socially crippled animals.
     
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  18. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    I disagree its against animal welfare, as long as the animals are not being abused. Animals raised with humans often love human contact.
     
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  19. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Do they? Or don’t they know anything else if not properly socialised with their conspecifics?
    Depending on the species and individual, some of these animals can be actually quite dangerous for the staff, too, since they see them as conspecific competitors.
    Modern zoos tend to not handraise most animals if possible, and if so, try to socialise them early on to prevent creating “Kasper Hausers“.
     
  20. Kakapo

    Kakapo Well-Known Member

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    Then you don't disagree with me. Meerkats are easier to keep not only than these specialist mammals that you mentioned but also than most of the commonly kepts species at many zoos. I didn't said that is the eastiest to keep (would be difficult to choose the easiest... maybe domestic mouse?) but that is one of the easiest. That's the reason that meerkats are so popular in any zoos, because they breed very well with little investiment.
    And about hand-reared animals, you're wrong again. That's an essential part of educational purposes on many modern zoos. Many zoos are limited to farm animals to be touches by children, but other use more exotic species. It's the same. As far as the animal is not abused, this provide the children an intimate contact with animals that in many cases is very important for the future love for animals of many of these people when adult.
     
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