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A couple of new (to me at least) thylacine photos.

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by oldrover, 14 Jan 2015.

  1. oldrover

    oldrover Well-Known Member

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    Doing my regular trawl of the net for thylacine shots I came acrosds three new ones.

    Not sure what this first one shows, I'll be contacting Cameron Campbell to see if he can shed any light on it.

    newpicture4_zps341eb089.jpg Photo by revotisThartmannIII | Photobucket

    I think this may be a more familiar shot;

    newpicture3_zpsb3db00d8.jpg Photo by revotisThartmannIII | Photobucket

    And a close up.

    newpicture2_zps70dcb344.jpg Photo by revotisThartmannIII | Photobucket

    I'm sure this is a new one, it's very like a more familiar shot but slightly different;

    newpicture1_zpse4daf215.jpg Photo by revotisThartmannIII | Photobucket

    A note about that last picture, which I think shows a female, is the thickening at the base of the tail. This is where healthy specimens kept a fat reserve.
     
  2. TheMightyOrca

    TheMightyOrca Well-Known Member

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    Good photos. I especially like the last one.
     
  3. Crowthorne

    Crowthorne Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for sharing! If I'm not mistaken, the last one looks like the London Zoo enclosure.
     
  4. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    It is at London.

    Photo 1 is new to me. (location unknown)

    Photos 2 & 3 (same shot, one enlarged) are well known, probably a family group from the way they are lying together. Hobart Zoo.

    Photo 4 is a new photo for me but the same individual at London as featured in other photos- it appears to have a slightly damaged/swollen foreleg. I agree this individual was probably a female- slighter build and with no penile bulge under the tail.
     
  5. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Agreed; this is definitely a photograph from London Zoo.

    Interestingly the picture appears to have been reversed; it is a mirror image of a photograph I have seen before.
     
  6. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    Several of the Hobart zoo Thylacine photos suffer from this reverse imaging also- it can create some confusion over identification etc until you are familiar with it.
     
  7. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    the first picture has been removed. What did it show?
     
  8. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    A very grainy/faded shot of two distant Thylacines lying side by side(facing the camera) with a netting background behind them and a boarded/wooden-type construction to one side.. Could have been Hobart Zoo but the surroundings did not look the same. No other clues.
     
  9. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    Doing a trawl of Thylacine photo sites I came across the above image again, in better/ enlarged form and more than once, so its still on the Internet. Sorry I can't give an exact link but try typing; sunbathing thylacines tumblr. and it should come up. It is labelled 'two Thylacines sunbathing. Date/location unknown'. But from the background it is clearly Hobart Zoo,with the familiar netting and woodwork. It looks like an adult pair to me.

    I also found another good image of the Washington Zoo Thylacines which I have never seen before- this is not the classic 'high def'. one that features so regularly as the 'classic' image of the species, but a different one. Try; inferorum-canis.tumblr.com and it might come up.
     
  10. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. oldrover

    oldrover Well-Known Member

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    Well done for the new Washington photo, it really is beautiful.

    The sleeping pair are as you say from Beaumaris Zoo 1918 or 19.

    Well done again.

    Now all we need is to see the photo that someone's girlfriends Nan took at London Zoo.
     
  12. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    I'll find the box the photographs from her childhood are kept in eventually.... not the only photo I want to post from that batch, either.
     
  13. oldrover

    oldrover Well-Known Member

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    That'd be wonderful mate, cheers.
     
  14. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    My guess would be; adult female on the left, one of her two surviving offspring,with slightly shorter legs and not yet full grown, on the right.

    Apparently the adult female was mounted after her death and is on (sort of) display at the Washington NH Museum. I say 'sort of' as it is exhibited behind a Dingo and is, rather oddly, partially screened by a curtain.

    The photo of two well-preserved skins( note the true unfaded colour!) in the Washington Museum vaults show a tiny baby Thylacine and an adult. Afaik this baby skin is quite unique as far as the quality of preservation goes, and it must be the one that died nine days after they arrived. The adult was presumably one of its two siblings (other photos show it as male) that survived to maturity. In the painting depicting the female Thylacine and the three pups(with the sick one in her pouch) soon after their arrival she is shown as very gaunt -looking. This would be an accurate depiction as she was apparently in poor condition after the sea and land journey. She recovered though and was able to rear the two surviving pups to maturity.
     
  15. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Could not find a photo of the baby skin, but the adult skin does indeed show the true colour!

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    The baby is in another photo together with the adult skin. Also in another photo with someone holding the tray they are both on.

    I also remember noting the 'true' colour in unfaded museum skin specimens I've examined at London and in Tasmania too. Its one reason I'm slightly sceptical of sightings describing them as 'sandy' or fawn'. Alison Reid, whose father was the last curator of Hobart Zoo also told me their fur was 'like a rabbit'.
     
    Last edited: 3 Mar 2015
  17. oldrover

    oldrover Well-Known Member

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    I agree, the left hand side one is a female. I've not seen the baby skin either.

    It's always good to see the above photo, nice to see them more as they would have been before they became faded museum exhibits.

    They look so alive in those photos, it's tragic.
     
  18. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    I can't give you an exact link for the 'baby skin' photo but its relatively easy to come across- just try looking in 'thylacine images' for a start. It is shown with the adult skin. This Washington shot is an evocative one-note the right-hand animal's curved tail- a sign of confidence I believe.
     
  19. oldrover

    oldrover Well-Known Member

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    Paddle certainly proposed the idea that the curved tail was a sign of confidence. As I've said before though, I'm wary of his conclusions. That said it may well be right.

    I'm going to try to track the baby skin picture down.
     
  20. Ned

    Ned Well-Known Member

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