Join our zoo community

Aardvarks UK

Discussion in 'Private Collections & Pets' started by 11jadaway, 29 Sep 2013.

  1. 11jadaway

    11jadaway Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Sep 2012
    Posts:
    113
    Location:
    Kingston Upon Thames
    Can you own an aardvark in the UK?
     
  2. IanRRobinson

    IanRRobinson Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    2 Dec 2010
    Posts:
    1,332
    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    An unusual ambition, but having stroked one long ago, one that I quite understand...
     
  3. DesertRhino150

    DesertRhino150 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    15 Jul 2010
    Posts:
    1,666
    Location:
    Essex
  4. DavidBrown

    DavidBrown Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2008
    Posts:
    4,507
    Location:
    California, USA
  5. IanRRobinson

    IanRRobinson Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    2 Dec 2010
    Posts:
    1,332
    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    Alas, no...:(
     
  6. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18 Jun 2011
    Posts:
    2,378
    Location:
    London, UK
    Hello David. I came across the list when I was doing some research for a question. I wonder why people could keep a bay cat or kodkod. As far as I know, neither species is kept by any zoo. You also don't need a licence for a broad-nosed gentle lemur, but you need one for a ring-tailed lemur or an indri. You also don't need a licence for a thylacine, but you do for a capuchin monkey, which is considered to be a dangerous animal, while a human isn't. Presumably you can keep a New Guinea singing dog, but you can't keep a dingo. I also wonder why the European otter is the only species not considered to be dangerous. Also, I wonder why none of the deadly venomous cnidarians are mentioned, specially as several aquartia now how various jellyfish. Alos, no insects are mentioned and I doubt if neighbours would be happy if Asiatic giant hornets or African killer bees escaped from a zoo from Hell.

    I must admit that I'm impressed that the people compiling the list knew about certain species that most people wouldn't have heard of. I just find it confusing how some were classified as dangerous, while close relatives were not.
     
  7. thunder_monkey

    thunder_monkey Active Member

    Joined:
    28 Aug 2013
    Posts:
    37
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    I wondered if the reason that European badgers and otters were exempt was so that wildlife rescue centres didn't need a licence, but that would be pure speculation on my part!
     
  8. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    16 May 2010
    Posts:
    12,908
    Location:
    UK
    I suspect that, where the felid listings are concerned, they just chose a cut-off point in terms of weight and designated anything heavier as DWA-level, as all the species listed are the most lightweight feline taxa.
     
  9. Shirokuma

    Shirokuma Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    1 Sep 2009
    Posts:
    1,889
    Location:
    Europe
    I think things like jellyfish aren't mentioned because they can't really escape and cause trouble. The listings are assessed on what an animal could to do if it got out and came into contact with members of the public rather than on risk to the owner or caregiver.
     
  10. stubeanz

    stubeanz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Mar 2008
    Posts:
    544
    Location:
    hertfordshire, england
    The DWAL is there to protect the public not the owner, so that's the reason why cnidarians aren't covered by it. The reason European badgers, European otters and grey seals are not covered by it is because they are covered by other legislation stopping the public from keeping them unless they are recovering from an illness and recuperating.

    Dassie rat, the reason the people compiling the list knew so much is because that is their profession! :D there is a committee that updated the DWAL in 2007 that included members from various public bodies and included people who keep dangerous wild animals themselves.
     
  11. stubeanz

    stubeanz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Mar 2008
    Posts:
    544
    Location:
    hertfordshire, england
    Beat me by a minute shirokuma ;)
     
  12. DavidBrown

    DavidBrown Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2008
    Posts:
    4,507
    Location:
    California, USA
    BRITISH PRIME MINISTER ATTACKED BY ESCAPED JELLYFISH

    British Prime Minister David Cameron was stung by a swarm of box jellies this afternoon at 10 Downing Street. While authorities have not released details, the jellies were believed to have been in the toilet of Cameron's private bathroom. The jellies are thought to have found their way into 10 Downing Street through the sewer system and possibly originated as escaped animals from a private collector. The extent and location of Cameron's injuries are undisclosed at this time, but given the location of the jellies....
     
  13. Shirokuma

    Shirokuma Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    1 Sep 2009
    Posts:
    1,889
    Location:
    Europe

    Don't start giving me ideas!
     
  14. thunder_monkey

    thunder_monkey Active Member

    Joined:
    28 Aug 2013
    Posts:
    37
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    Thanks for the explanation, that makes a lot of sense!
     
  15. dean

    dean Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    25 Aug 2012
    Posts:
    712
    Location:
    North Essex.
    In fact I remember reading that the DWA act was only brought in in 1976 because the government hung by a thread and to get the extra votes needed to stave off an election they gave in and produced the list.
    Personally I don't mind it on the whole, the problem is it is down to individual councils to police and having worked in local government myself i'm not sure some of them would know a rat tailed maggot from a middle eastern thin tailed scorpion.

    It is ironic that one of the most dangerous animal bites comes from the common moggy felis domesticus,as their mouths contain a multitude of b very dangerous bacteria,of course they also have claws to back up the teeth, some of the animals on the list couldn't do as much damage as a cat at full throttle can do
    .
    Is Northern Ireland now covered with the DWA as it didn't use to be?
     
  16. stubeanz

    stubeanz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Mar 2008
    Posts:
    544
    Location:
    hertfordshire, england
    Northern Ireland were not covered by any legislation regarding dangerous wild animals up until 2006 when the DWA legislation from the rest of the UK was introduced. The Republic of Ireland still has no DWAL!
     
  17. James w

    James w Active Member

    Joined:
    2 Jul 2018
    Posts:
    33
    Location:
    Uk
    Hey,
    When I was studying to be a keeper we studied zoo legislation, and public laws.

    Some animals I have worked with should be on there. For example that was a good point u made about the venomous marine life..the thinking is safety of others if escaped. I know dwa keepers, they are held responsible for their envenomation procedure. The law tends towards public not keeper..I.e. a stone fish is a hazard for owner not someone next door. Blue ringed octopus are v good at escaping enclosures, should be on there. I know they are getting stricter with large constrictor snakes..rock python, retic, anaconda..very potentially dangerous.

    I worked with inverts a lot and here are some that should be taken more seriously that are not dwa..
    Platymerus (assassin bugs)..can be v nasty
    Scolopendra..dodgy to work with, rather clean out a latrodectus spider than a large centipede, and like hell when using tongs.
    As you said some stinging wasps,hornets. Wouldnt fancy a bulldog ant sting, and would cause havoc in environment
    Had a friend who kept six eyed sand spiders, they have nasty venom but no license.
    Great discussion..and shows how laws in general dont make sense, particularly wildlife laws
    I do a lot with native reptiles, set up and monitor sites for ARG.particularly adders..adders need much more protection there are so many loop holes in their protection, we have big problems with people interference
    Needs to be more control for conservation issues too..lot of inverts decimated by over collection for the trade..
    Remember a guy who kept a spotted hyena in his house roaming free in one country..umm no..lot of zoo and private keepers obituaries of people that "I hand reared that leopard since a cub, always hands on" ..
    Welfare too..snapping turtles that outgrow enclosures let loose and my fave..in one tropical pet centre..a naked mole rat kept on sawdust..alone..
    There are some great private keepers that breed species when zoos fail, but a lot slips by
     
    Last edited: 5 Sep 2019