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ABA Checklist 2018

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by birdsandbats, 13 Dec 2018.

  1. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Species added:

    • Indian Peafowl added as a Code 3 species based on introduced populations found in Florida, California, and Hawaii.
    • Great Black Hawk added as a Code 5 species based on records from South Padre Island, Texas in April 2018 and Biddleford, Maine in October 2018.
    • Red-backed Shrike added as a Code 5 species based on a record from Gambell, Alaska in October 2017.
    • Thick-Billed Warbler added as a Code 5 species based on a record from Gambell, Alaska in October 2017.
    • River Warbler added as a Code 5 species based on a record from Gambell, Alaska in October 2017.
    • European Robin added as a Code 5 species based on a record from North Wales, Pennsylvania in February 2015.
    • Pied Wheatear added as a Code 5 species based on a record from Nome, Alaska in July 2017.
    • Mistle Thrush added as a Code 5 species based on a record from Miramichi, New Brunswick in December 2017.
    • Black-Backed Oriole added as a Code 5 species based on records from Reading, Pennsylvania in February 2017 and Sutton, Massachusetts in May 2018.
    Common Name Changes:
    • Common Name of Gray Jay changed to Canada Jay as to not offend Canadians.
     
  2. Brum

    Brum Well-Known Member

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    What? How is the term grey (or, in this case "gray") offensive? Is it a cultural thing I'm not getting?
     
  3. Vision

    Vision Well-Known Member

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    It isn't, I'm not sure where @birdsandbats got that from... I assume it was a joke?

    The bird's original name when being described was Canada Jay, but was changed to Gray Jay in 1947-1948 by the AOU to better accommodate for common names of subspecies ("Alaska Canada Jay" sounded a bit weird, so "Alaska Gray Jay" would be preferable). However, in 1954 the AOU reverted the decision that all subspecies needed common names, so logically the name would become the old "original" name again - but it didn't, until now.

    More info here: The Gray Jay Will Officially Be Called the Canada Jay Again

    I think we can all agree "Whiskey Jack" would be better than either option? :p
     
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  4. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Although it was kind of a joke, I did read an article about it that said some Canadian birders were actually offended by the name Gray Jay. I don't know why (possibly the spelling).

    I agree I would be fine calling it a Whiskey Jack.
     
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  5. Brum

    Brum Well-Known Member

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    I missed the joke, my bad! :oops: But yeah, Whiskey Jack all the way! :D