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Adelaide Zoo Adelaide Zoo News 2019

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Jambo, 5 Jan 2019.

  1. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    The upper age limit of reproduction for a female Giant panda appears to be 21 years. A few pandas have reached this (including Bai Yun at San Diego Zoo); though I'd imagine most, like Bai Yun, had a strong reproductive history leading up to that final birth (i.e. first births at 20+ would be unlikely).

    I hope the contract is renewed; though if they stay another 5 years, then Funi returns to China as an 18 year old and then gives birth almost immediately after a decade of failing to breed at Adelaide, that will be a little embarassing. Hopefully a 5 year extension will give both Funi a chance to experience motherhood; and Adelaide the success they're working so hard for. The first birth of a Giant panda in Australasia would be a very special zoological achievement.
     
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  2. Jambo

    Jambo Well-Known Member

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  3. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    From a non financial perspective, I think it’s great Adelaide Zoo are giving Australians a chance to see Giant panda. I even know people from New Zealand who have made a trip to Adelaide for no other purpose than to see Wang Wang and Funi. If Giant pandas were at Auckland, Hamilton and Wellington Zoo, I’d certainly make a trip to see them as I’m sure many from Sydney, Melbourne etc have to Adelaide.
     
    Last edited: 18 Feb 2019
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  4. WhistlingKite24

    WhistlingKite24 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Adelaide Zoo has announced that two of their palm cockatoos are moving to a zoo in New South Wales. The birds are sisters, and are two of the four offspring that have been bred at the zoo. Very valuable birds!
    They didn’t mention the zoo they are moving to, any ideas? Taronga maybe?
    Adelaide Zoo
     
    Last edited: 13 Mar 2019
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  5. Jambo

    Jambo Well-Known Member

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  6. Astrobird

    Astrobird Well-Known Member

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    Why don't more Zoos or even private people have Palm Cockatoos? Being an Australian species, I would have thought the standard licence requirements would have covered the keeping of them? They're an amazing species (I seem to remember there being some kind of restrictions on keeping them but don't remember the details)
     
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  7. toothlessjaws

    toothlessjaws Well-Known Member

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    Yes it is odd that this is a native species thats established in aviculture overseas, and yet private individuals in Australia are not allowed to keep them. My suspicion is that the reason is: they were not established in captivity here and already endangered when most native animal licensing systems was brought into proper effect. If memory serves correct all of Adelaide's animals are descended from their pair which are different subspecies. A male of PNG heritage (at a guess might be the descendant of historic imports) and a female of Australian origin (perhaps a confiscation or rescue?). In any event I'd like to see, for the good of the species, some eggs taken from wild birds to establish a decent gene pool in captivity in zoos. Once established if that spilled over into private aviculture I wouldn't mind one bit!
     
  8. MRJ

    MRJ Well-Known Member

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    The biggest restriction is that of course they cannot be taken from the wild or imported legally. Allied to that authorities would be wary of any coming into private hands, even legally, as they could then be used to "launder" wild caught birds into captivity.
     
  9. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

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    If they are native species and not so uncommon at least in some places, should they not pop up in local rescue centers from time to time? Some portion of rescue animals is always not releasable due to permanent damage (wing, eyesight etc.). Starting a captive population seems manageable over time. Or am I missing something?
     
  10. Astrobird

    Astrobird Well-Known Member

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    whilst its diverting from Adelaide news as such, there was Palm cockatoos at the Pearl Coast Zoo which closed, and the parrot collection was taken over and moved to QLD by the ex curator (a Graeme Taylor?) so I assume they became part of a private collection somewhere?
     
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  11. MRJ

    MRJ Well-Known Member

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    (Wry smile at European ignorance) Missing lots. In Australia palm cockatoos are only found in isolated pockets of the Cape York Peninsula, a wilderness area more than 3 1/2 times the area of the Czech Republic with a population of only 18,000 people, 60% of whom are Aboriginal. So unlikely to pop up at an rescue centre if indeed one exists there.
     
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  12. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    MRJ, willing to learn more (and not being too biased ... methinks)!

    Do you know what the population is like in terms of numbers and trends in the Cape York Peninsula? Would a captive component to in situ conservation be helpful at all in Australia for the local population?
     
  13. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

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    Hmm, I see. Seems like real wilderness with little people. Would like to visit it sometime.

    In my country we have over 30 certified large rescue animals stations that handle ca 25.000 injured wild animals per year (domestic and exotic animals excluded) and probably hundreds of not-registered individuals and organisations that run smaller rescue places. So basically any native species gets into captivity sooner or later.
     
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  14. MRJ

    MRJ Well-Known Member

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    I believe there are only about 3,000 birds in the wild. Their requirements are quite specialised so they are restricted to pockets of habitat on Cape York. At the moment I think a captive component is unlikely and authorities would be looking more at habitat preservation/enhancement.
     
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  15. MRJ

    MRJ Well-Known Member

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    I hope you did not think me rude regarding my comments on country size. It is just I am continually amazed as to how small people think Australia is compared to it's actual size. I believe this is due to distortions in the Mercator projection. In my state, Victoria, which is about the same area as Cape York, we have a population of about 6.5 million, and of course there would be hundreds if not thousands of people involved in some way with wildlife rescue. Just no palm cockatoos, though.
     
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  16. Hix

    Hix Wildlife Enthusiast and Lover of Islands Premium Member

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    A comparison to reinforce your point: Cape York has a population of about 18,000 people, yet it is more than 4 times the size of the Czech Republic, and pretty much all of it is wilderness.

    :p

    Hix
     
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  17. WhistlingKite24

    WhistlingKite24 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Dharba, one of the two female giraffe at Adelaide Zoo has passed away during a health procedure. :(
    Adelaide Zoo
    It will be interesting to see if Adelaide Zoo will now move Kimya (the zoo’s other female) to her new home sooner rather than later.
     
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  18. WhistlingKite24

    WhistlingKite24 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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  19. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Five more years! I’m surprised at the suggestion of replacing the male, considering semen analysis of Wang Wang over the past few breeding seasons have yielded good results. I’d be more tempted to investigate Funi’s reproductive viability and the possibility of exchanging her for a proven breeder.
     
  20. Jambo

    Jambo Well-Known Member

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    In early March, Adelaide welcomed 2 Asian short clawed otter pups to parents, Bao and Kalaya.

    No cookies | NT News
     
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