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Angkor Centre for Conservation of Biodiversity

Discussion in 'Cambodia' started by devilfish, 6 May 2011.

  1. devilfish

    devilfish Well-Known Member

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    The centre seems to do a lot of good work with an amazing range of species. They've released lots of interesting news and photos on their facebook page and within the last hour, they've uploaded photos of a rescued giant ibis:
    Angkor Centre for Conservation of Biodiversity | Facebook
     
  2. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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  3. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  4. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  5. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    Woolly necked stork hatched at Angkor . The same breeding pair also bred last year.
     
  6. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    2 Sarus cranes released back into the wild :) :

    Good news for the conservation of the threatened Sarus Crane (Antigone antigone)! Due to the good collaboration of various people, institutions and organizations, it was possible to release two Sarus Cranes back into the wild.
    One bird had been rescued after researcher Robert van Zalinge (Charles Darwin University) – who had previously tagged many birds – had found out that this individual did not move anymore. Due to his investigations, it was possible to locate the crane at a house of a dealer in Kampong Thom Province. The bird was finally confiscated by the Forestry Administration and had a short period of rehabilitation at the ACCB.
    Another Sarus Crane which had originated from Takeo Province and had been kept at the Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center was transported by staff members of Wildlife Alliance to the ACCB in order to release both animals together. A few days later, the ACCB team and Robert van Zalinge released the two cranes back into the wild, in close proximity of other cranes. Robert van Zalinge is still monitoring the two birds thanks to the funding of the National Geographic Society.

    The Sarus Crane is a threatened bird species and listed in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as VULNERABLE, with the South-East Asian subspecies (Antigone antigone sharpii) being the lowest in numbers, due to a dramatic decline in range, now being confined to Cambodia, extreme southern Laos, south Vietnam and Myanmar. The two released individuals hopefully will now be able to contribute to the conservation of this species.

    Source : Angkor's FB-page
     
  7. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    For the 3th time Woolly-necked storks have htched :) :

    We are happy to welcome the first hatched chicks of the Woolly-necked Storks (Ciconia episcopus) of the year! This is the third time these parents have bred here at the ACCB - their previous offspring hatched in June 2014 (2 chicks) and March 2015 (1 chick). The female laid two eggs mid January, and the eggs have been incubated and guarded by both parents. During the nest control on February 15th, after an incubation period of about one month, we noticed that one of the chicks was hatching. We are happy to be able to share some of the pictures of the "pipping" (the initial breaking of the shell) taken by our dedicated staff. On Friday we will share the first pictures of the hatchlings.

    Woolly-necked Storks were reclassified as a Vulnerable species in 2014 due to their ongoing population decline and widespread loss of habitat in Asia. The success of this breeding pair plays an important role in the ongoing conservation of their species.

    ( FB )
     
  8. devilfish

    devilfish Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately the giant ibis died around the start of this year. He was the only one in captivity.
     
  9. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    Kifaru Bwana and drill like this.
  10. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    Rescue of a Giant ibis :

    Extremely Rare Giant Ibis Arrived at ACCB!

    Earlier this week, we were alerted by our colleagues from WWF-Cambodia អង្គការមូលនិធិសកលសម្រាប់អភិរក្សធនធានធម្មជាតិ to rescue one Giant Ibis (Thaumatibis gigantea) from Stung Treng Province. Luckily, Mr. HOUNG Theara and his team from Xplore-Asia Stung Treng found the bird just in time and prevented local fishermen from eating one of the rarest birds on this planet. They tried to release this individual in a protected area, but the ibis did not fly away. Therefore, it had been decided to hand this bird over into ACCB's care for rehabilitation and treatment. Our team immediately left our centre for the 5-hour drive to pick up this important animal. A first assessment revealed no major injuries and further diagnostic tests are ongoing. At the moment, the bird is stable and adapting to the new environment at ACCB. The Giant Ibis is the National Bird of the Kingdom of Cambodia and today almost exclusively found in the Northeast of Cambodia.
    With estimated only 200-300 individuals alive worldwide, the Giant Ibis is not only listed as Critically Endangered in IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species, but also second in the EDGE List of Birds (Evolutionarily Distinct & Globally Endangered).

    At the moment, ACCB is the only institution worldwide with experience in the rescue and husbandry of Giant Ibises and ACCB's team is currently taking care of three individuals.

    We would like to thank Mr. HOUNG Theara and his team for rescuing this Giant Ibis and the Ministry of Environment and WWF Cambodia for the good collaboration!
     
    Swampy, FunkyGibbon, Kakapo and 3 others like this.
  11. Stefan Verhoeven

    Stefan Verhoeven Well-Known Member

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    I have seen the previous Giant ibis in 2014.
    I must see it was a nice place with good and spacious enclosures and some decent amount of offspring in the bird and reptile departement. Mainly run by western (semi)volunteers, with hopefully a growing number of locals joining in. Also a very important place as educational tool for Cambodia.
     
    Kifaru Bwana likes this.