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Animals that look related but aren't.

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by FelipeDBKO, 16 Sep 2016.

  1. FelipeDBKO

    FelipeDBKO Well-Known Member

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    The evolution is a box of surprises. Who imagine that a Tasmanian Devil is closer to kangaroos than placental carnivores such as skunks? Or that a manatee is closer to a hyrax than cetaceans and pinnipeds? In some cases this is even more extreme, like Emerald Tree Boas and Green Tree Pythons.
    Does anyone know more cases like this?
     
  2. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

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    There are many examples of marsupials that resemble placentals due to convergence.

    A few examples of animals that look like distant relations include:

    Red panda and raccoons
    Caecilians and earthworms or eels
    Slow-worms and snakes
    Root rats, pocket gophers and African mole rats
    Jerboas and kangaroo rats
    Pheasant pigeons and pheasants
    Coral snakes and milk snakes
     
  3. FelipeDBKO

    FelipeDBKO Well-Known Member

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    The Red pandas doesn't have any very close living relative, being in the Ailuridae family... But, like raccoons, Red pandas are part of Musteloidea superfamily, so despite the raccoons aren't very close to the Red pandas, they still one of the closest living animals of it.
     
  4. Norwegian moose

    Norwegian moose Well-Known Member

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    A good example of convergent evolution is: how similiar itjaritjaris are to european moles, even though they do not belong to the same order.
     
  5. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    -Turacos (especially great blue turaco) to curassows
    -Common spotted cuscus to some lemurs like gentle lemurs or to greater bamboo lemur
     
  6. aardvark250

    aardvark250 Well-Known Member

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    Hyrax and mouse look similar but one is related to elephant
     
  7. ThylacineAlive

    ThylacineAlive Well-Known Member

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    Mongoose and Malagasy vontsiras:p

    ~Thylo:cool:
     
  8. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    To be fair, the Euplerids *are* the sister group to the Herpestids.....
     
  9. KevinVar

    KevinVar Well-Known Member

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    I'd say giant anteater and aardvark would be a fair case.
     
  10. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    ??? Have you ever seen one of these alive ???
     
  11. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately no vogelcommando; why, you think that they not look simmilar? :)

    I saw simmilarity in the crest and long tail feathers, and body shape - aproximately;
     
  12. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    Old World vultures and New World vultures :).
     
  13. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    Curassows : mainly black and/or brown ground-living birds
    Touracos : most species green or blue colored canopy-living birds
     
  14. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    Yes of course I knew this; But they (turacos) reminded me on curassows, and great blue turaco in particular - with his crest, body size, long slender tail, and even the beak (yellow); Also plantain eaters (like violet turaco or Ross's turaco - darker color and yellow beak).
     
  15. FelipeDBKO

    FelipeDBKO Well-Known Member

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    But they're related (Accipitridae)
     
  16. FelipeDBKO

    FelipeDBKO Well-Known Member

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    Several marsupials look like insectivores (which are quite close to them) and rodents.
     
  17. KevinVar

    KevinVar Well-Known Member

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    In the end, isn't everything?
     
  18. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Nope - New World Vultures are in a different family entirely (Cathartidae) and are increasingly assigned to a different order (Cathartiformes) as well!

    No closer than every other placental mammal - so not close at all :p
     
  19. FelipeDBKO

    FelipeDBKO Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, it was a mistake.

    Yeah, I meant that they're among the most primitive placentals... It's like comparing dinosaurs and birds: evolutionarily birds are closer, but taxonomically snakes.
     
  20. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Nope, non-avian dinosaurs are taxonomically closer to birds as well as evolutionarily closer :p given that non-avian dinosaurs are within the same order (Saurischia) as birds, whilst the snakes are deeply nested within the Squamata - an order whose last common ancestor with the Archosauromorpha (the clade containing dinosaurs and hence birds, along with crocodilians and testudines) was also the last common ancestor of *all* extant reptiles.