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Animals You've Seen That Few Zoochatters Have Seen

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Hipporex, 18 Dec 2018.

  1. zoogiraffe

    zoogiraffe Well-Known Member

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    I smell a rat either that or its an elephant load of manure. I think we have gained a new lesser fijian troll!
     
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  2. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    Neither. I'm just clumsy ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
     
  3. ThylacineAlive

    ThylacineAlive Well-Known Member

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    Sure, but there is a fundamental difference between one (somehow) forgetting they've been to a country (twice), and one specifically stating that said country is one of the top 5 they'd like to visit one day because they have never been there. ;)

    ~Thylo
     
  4. zoogiraffe

    zoogiraffe Well-Known Member

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    We definitely have a lesser fijian troll on our hands although it is hard to tell the difference with a greater
     
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  5. TZDugong

    TZDugong Well-Known Member

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    You went to China for 2 days:confused:? According to google it’s a 13 hour flight from London to Guangzhou, so you’d be spending 26 hours round-trip(plus time waiting at the airport) on planes just to be in China for 48 hours:eek:.
     
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  6. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

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    Well, if you don't see your mother that regularly its a sacrifice you are often willing to make.
     
  7. Davdhole

    Davdhole Member

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    I'm not too sure if some of these species are that rare or have been seen by many zoochatters, but I have yet to see that many mention seeing these.

    Mammals
    Bush dog
    Tanuki
    Blue duiker
    Red-flanked duiker
    Gerenuk
    Eld's deer
    New Guinea singing dog
    Dhole
    Black-footed cat
    African wild cat
    Mongoose lemur
    Collared lemur
    Lion-tailed macaque
    Black duiker
    Grant's gazelle
    Arabian oryx
    Green monkey
    Patas monkey
    Pied tamarin
    Fishing cat
    Pacific white-sided dolphin
    Drill
    Lowland anoa
    Geoffery's tamarin
    Giant panda
    Babirusa
    Guanco
    Barbary striped mouse
    Fossa
    Indian crested porcupine
    De Brazza's monkey
    That's all rare mammals that come to mind
     
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  8. Davdhole

    Davdhole Member

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    Birds
    Again, I don't know if these are even considered rare sights, but these are animals I've just haven't seen or heard mentioned much.

    Great Indian hornbill
    Rhinoceros hornbill
    Lesser flamingo
    Green woodhoopoe
    Venezuelan troupial
    Bali mynah
    Green junglefowl
    Knob-billed duck
    Black curassow
    Harpy eagle
    Macaroni penguin
    Andean condor
    Milky eagle owl
    Yellow-billed stork
    Black-crowned crane
    Secretary bird
    Red-headed cardinal
    Amethyst starling
    Cinereous vulture
    White-cheeked turaco
    Great blue turaco
    Aplomado falcon
    Bruce's green pigeon
    Wood stork
    Raggiana bird-of-paradise
    Red-crowned crane


    Reptiles
    Mexican alligator lizard
    Cuban crocodile
    Fiji banded iguana
    Blue tree monitor
    Jamaican boa
    Boelen's python
    Chinese moccasin
    Armenian viper
    Mexican lance-headed rattlesnake
    Chinese crocodile lizard
    Guatemalan beaded lizard
    Black beaded lizard
    Orinoco crocodile
    Loggerhead sea turtle
    Urutu
    Rhinoceros viper
    Fer-de-lance
    Chinese alligator
    Tropical rattlesnake
    Chinese mountain viper
    Black tree monitor
    Mexican cantil
    Burrowing python
    Mata mata
    Galapagos tortoise
    Bog turtle
    Pig-nosed turle

    Amphibians
    Fringed leaf frog
    Waxy monkey tree frog
    Panamanian golden frog
    Tomato frog
    Hellbender
    Lake Zacapu salamander
    Titicaca water frog
    Hourglass tree frog
    Strawberry poison dart frog
    Caecilian
    Surinam toad
    White-spotted glass frog
    Mossy tree frog
    Smoky jungle frog
    Greater siren
    Black-legged poison dart frog

    Fish, which is where I'll stop since it's so much
    Horse-eyed jack
    Paddlefish
    Potato grouper
    Queensland grouper
    Whale shark
    Manta ray
    Lesser devil ray
    Garibaldi
    Ratfish
    Mutton snapper
    Great hammerhead
    Remora
    Freshwater wolffish
    African tigerfish
    Wolf eel
    White-tip reef shark
    Oceanic blacktip shark
    Weedy sea dragon
    Port Jackson shark
    Hogfish
    Humphead wrasse
    Swell shark
    Wobbegong
    Electric eel
    Filefish
    Archerfish



     
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  9. TinoPup

    TinoPup Well-Known Member

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    For mammals, mongoose lemurs, fishing cats, geoffroy's tamarin, fossa, and de brazza's monkey are fairly common in zoos. Red-flanked duiker, black duiker, Eld's deer, pacific white-sided dolphin, giant panda, and babirusa I'd classify as rare. The rest are dependent on interpretation of the word, I think.

    I've seen blue duiker, gerenuk, singing dog, dhole, black-footed cat, african wild cat, arabian oryx, fishing cat, lowland anoa, giant panda, barbary striped mouse, fossa, and indian crested porcupine. The primates I'm not sure of, I don't pay as much attention to species that I see in person (should probably make a list).

    From your other lists, ones I'd say are common:
    Andean Condor
    Black-crowned Crane
    Chinese Crocodile
    Fiji Banded Iguana
    Rhinoceros Viper
    Mata Mata
    Hellbender
    Blacktip shark
    Wobbegong
    Electric Eel
     
  10. Yoshistar888

    Yoshistar888 Well-Known Member

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    Ive seen a blue billed duck in the wild before
     
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  11. ThylacineAlive

    ThylacineAlive Well-Known Member

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    Seen all but the Green Monkey and dolphin :)

    Only missing Urutu, Chinese Mountain Pitviper, and the glass frog.

    ~Thylo
     
  12. TinoPup

    TinoPup Well-Known Member

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    I'm surprised you haven't seen the vervet! Rosamond Gifford has them, plus San Diego and a few others.
     
  13. animal_expert01

    animal_expert01 Well-Known Member

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    I never said any of them were rare, in fact in certain locations some of these species can be quite abundant (as I’m sure your quite aware). I just based my list of species that had limited ranges or were found in places people don’t usually visit.

    So probably the only things that could be considered rare sightings amongst zoochatters would be Mary River Cod, Ornate Rainbowfish, Paradise Riflebird, Australian Bustard, Emu, Spinifex Pigeon and Red Kangaroo.

    On a side note, I would be very interested in seeing your list.
     
  14. Andrew Swales

    Andrew Swales Well-Known Member

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    Are Emus and Red Kangaroos rare...?
     
  15. animal_expert01

    animal_expert01 Well-Known Member

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    In the wild or captivity? If you are talking about the wild no they are not rare at all, just not many zoochatters have seen them. The ease of seeing them in the wild is also heavily dependent on the rains.
     
  16. Andrew Swales

    Andrew Swales Well-Known Member

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    I really don't see you point - if you say they are not rare in the wild (and they are certainly not rare in captivity), then the only reason most ZooChatters haven't seen them in the wild, is because most ZooChatters don't live in Australia.
     
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  17. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes... hence they have rarely been seen by Zoochatters. The same as saying few Zoochatters have seen Grey-shanked Doucs because few Zoochatters have been to Vietnam. That's generally how something being rarely seen works - they are either wild or captive in places to which few Zoochatters have been. It's not difficult to understand.
     
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  18. Zia

    Zia Well-Known Member

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    How easy has it been to see Black Footed Cat historically? We got very lucky with seeing the last one at Port Lympne in the year before it died.
     
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  19. Okapi Lover

    Okapi Lover Well-Known Member

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    For some reason I have in my head that black footed cats are one of those animals whose presence varies far more dramatically between regions than one would expect. As of 2018, at least 19 US collections had them.
     
  20. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Until the decade or so before the species disappeared from Europe, it was faring pretty well in European collections - not many collections held the species relatively speaking, but they bred ridiculously well in those collections which did hold them; Wuppertal alone had a breeding population of something like 20 individuals in the early 1990s.

    Then the population crashed due to genetic bottlenecking allowing fatal kidney disease to become prevalent in the captive population, sad to say. To give an idea of how fast the decline hit, of the 24 collections listed on ZTL as having held the species, 14 still did so within the 2000s and 2010s.
     
    Last edited: 23 Feb 2020
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