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Auckland Zoo Auckland Zoo Hippo's

Discussion in 'New Zealand' started by Joe Franklin, 22 Jan 2019.

  1. Jambo

    Jambo Well-Known Member

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    Nah, don’t think so. The hippo mortality rate of the calves was always like that.

    I believe it may have increased a little bit because of the amount of the hippos they had at that time in those two small enclosures. This definitely would’ve caused a lot of dominance and aggression. So if there was little calves in the mix, then they most definitely wouldn’t have stood a chance.
     
    Last edited: 17 Oct 2019
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  2. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    The mortality rate was consistently high in both exhibits. As @Jambo said, the amount of hippopotami (especially adult bulls) would have had the biggest impact.

    Survival of calves was pretty good up until the late 1960. By this time , the zoo had four adult hippopotami including two bulls, Scuba and Kabete; and two females, who were unrelated to each other.

    In 1980, the population was at 2.4 adults and the last three calves had died. The death of one of the bulls in 1980 probably allowed the survival of Faith’s calf in 1982. With two exhibits, they could seperate the bull and the other three cows into one exhibit; away from Faith and her newborn son.
     
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  3. Tafin

    Tafin Well-Known Member

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    Thank you both for your replies @Zoofan15 and @Jambo. Do you know what groups the hippos were kept in during the 1960s to 1980s?
     
  4. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    If we use paternity of calves born during that period as an indicator:

    1956-1965: Kabete and Nada
    1966-1972: Kabete and Snorkle; Scuba and Bonnie
    1973-1975: Kabete and Bonnie; Scuba and Snorkle
    1977-1980: Kabete, Snorkle and Hope; Scuba, Bonnie and Faith
    1980-1981: Kabete, Snorkle and Hope; Bonnie and Faith
    1982-1986: Kabete, Faith and Floyd; Snorkle
    1987: Kabete, Faith and Fonzee; Snorkle and Solucky
    1988: Kabete and Snorkle; Faith and Fudge
    1989-1993: Kabete, Faith and Fudge; Snorkle
    1994: Faith and Fudge; Snorkle

    Kabete alternated between Snorkle and Faith in the late 80’s/early 90’s, likely based on who had a young calf at the time. Snorkle gave birth to a calf in Dec 1988, which would have been conceived March 1988. This is the month Faith gave birth to twins (which would have required Kabete’s temporary removal).
     
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  5. Tafin

    Tafin Well-Known Member

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    That's really interesting. So Floyd was kept with his father, Kabete up until he died? I was just looking at the list of hippo births you linked in the other thread and it said Fonzee and Solucky was born within a month of eachother. Do you know how they would have managed this with Kabete and Floyd around?
     
  6. Zoofan15

    Zoofan15 Well-Known Member

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    Yes he was. We know this because Floyd died during an operation at the age of five to castrate him. The aim was to reduce the fighting between him and his father.

    I don't know for sure but it's likely that Snorkle and Faith were put together, along with their newborn calves; while Kabete and Floyd occupied the other exhibit. It'd also explain the decision to castrate Floyd; rather than separate him from Kabete i.e. he couldn't have been separated as the females and newborn calves were occupying the other exhibit.
     
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