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Avifauna Dunfermline

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by lowland anoa, 14 Jan 2016.

  1. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Dunfermline, Scotland, UK
    This is my fantasy zoo called Dunfermline Birdpark. As the name suggests, the park does not focus on the average animals, but birds. It has zones, broken up in different continents, much like Toronto Zoo. Here are the exhibits in this park:
    AFRICA
    African Rainforests
    Serengeti
    African Coasts
    Malagasy

    ASIA
    Asian Rainforests
    Islands
    Woodlands
    Deserts
    Asian Coasts

    AUSTRALIA
    Outback
    Australian Coasts
    Papua

    EUROPE
    European Coasts
    Woodlands
    Mountains
    European Wonders

    AMERICAS
    Deserts
    Rainforests
    Prairies
    Rockies
    Grasslands
    Coasts
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 10 Feb 2016
  2. MoleRat

    MoleRat Active Member

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    giza city, giza, egypt
    I like the idea of making a zoo focusing on birds

    I'd like to know more about the American prairies zone
     
  3. TheMightyOrca

    TheMightyOrca Well-Known Member

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    Birdpark! I made something similar a while ago. I'd gladly go to a real one if there was one nearby me, ha ha. Birds are cool.
     
  4. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    I read that one, it was amazing.
     
  5. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    I can't wait to see this one develop.
     
  6. Falanouc

    Falanouc Well-Known Member

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    Sounds great!
     
  7. aardvark250

    aardvark250 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    HK
    I want to see the European wonders
     
  8. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Which continent do you want to see first
     
  9. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    How about the Americas?
     
  10. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    When the visitors enter the birdpark, the gates are designed to resemble an aviary. The visitors enter the "aviary" they pay £4.00 for 12 and under, £7.50 for adults, £6.00 for seniors 60 and up and £5.00 for 13-18 ages. The ticket stalls are in the aviary. There is four on each side, There are tropical plants in the gates to look like an aviary. A family of Indian peafowls come here to sleep sometimes. The next part is American Rainforests! Just to inform you, due to its number of species, the exhibit will be in parts.
     
  11. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    When the visitor enter the Park, they will be surprised that they have to cross a rope bridge across a man-made river with lush plants and tress, in order to look like a South American rainforest. When they finish the bridge, noises will be heard, to the visitor's right there is an aviary that is 15 metre high and 120 feet long. It has woodchips for the flooring, with leaves scattered through the exhibit to resemble a forest floor. There are palms and many trees, with some stumps, to inform that rainforest are being cutted downs. There also logs and pebbles on the floor. A gigantic eagle comes in view. It's a Harpy Eagle (Harpia harpyja),the park has 1.3 eagles, but the females and the male regularly rotate, when it's the breeding season the eagles are brought together to breed.
    To the right, there's the Hummingbird's Heaven, which holds over 30 species of hummingbirds! The other 15 species are found in the deserts area. The aviaries are exactly the same. But differ in size. The aviaries are the same as the harpy eagles! The species are Antillean crested hummingbird (Orthorhyncus cristatus), Azure-crowned hummingbird (Amazilia cyanocephala), Berylline hummingbird (Amazilia beryllina), Black-billed streamertail (Trochilus scitulus), Black-breasted hillstar (Oreotrochilus melanogaster), Blue-chinned sapphire (Chlorestes notatus), Blue-tailed emerald (Chlorostilbon mellisugus), Bronze-tailed comet (Polyonymus caroli), Buff-tailed coronet (Boissonneaua flavescens), Chestnut-bellied hummingbird (Amazilia castaneiventris) and Chestnut-breasted coronet (Boissonneaua matthewsii),the other 18 species are spread out in the Rainforest area
    Oppopsite of the hummingbird aviaries, it's a large waterfowl pond, with South American forest waterfowl. The aviary has pebbles flooring, with a few grass patches. There is a clay wall with ivy (not the poison one) surronding the exhibit, the viewing glass is surrounded by it too. The pond end is netted, so the waterfowl can get out. The aviary has a fenced ceiling, so the birds doesn't need to be wing-clipped. The waterfowl found here are Black-necked swan (Cygnus melancoryphus),Rosy-billed pochard (Netta peposaca), Brazilian teal (Amazonetta brasiliensis) ,There are some logs and rocks. Lots of tree are in the exhibit to hold a flock of Hoatzins (Opisthocomus hoazin), Red-headed trogon (Harpactes erythrocephalus) and Guianan red cotinga (Phoenicircus carnifex). The other birds in the exhibit are Scarlet ibis (Eudocimus ruber) and Caribbean flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber)
    The visitors when then, go to see a display showing how the help of conservation are helping many endangered animals stay extant, showing photos of some reason some animals are endangered. Next to the display is a aviary holding 2 endangered species. A river flow through the middle, with some rocks. Soil is the floor, with leaves and branches. The exhibit is lushly planted with high plants and branches for the birds to perch on. There are many hiding areas, all of them are holes in the trees. The endangered species are Lear's macaw (Anodorhynchus leari) and Lilac-crowned amazon (Amazona finschi) An another aviary is opposite of the endangered aviary, it's also look the same and also has a endangered specie that is Horned guan (Oreophasis derbianus).
     
  12. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    The second part will be out at about 9:30ish
     
  13. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    After finishing the first part of the area, the visitors will see a tall and spacious aviary (60' tall, 75' wide and 90' long) with woochips. Some rocks are placed in the aviary to make sure these birds get enough perching. 75% of the exhibit is wooded and lushly planted. The 25% is open with a decent sized pool with mud and pebbles at the bottom. Only one rock is in the open area. Noises will be heared from above, from the top of the aviary, where the flying space is unbeliveable, is a flying King vulture (Sarcoramphus papa). The Birdpark holds 2.6 eagles, but a pair is offshow, adding 1.1 to the total number. This means the Birdpark has exactly 10 vultures, but a breeding group (3.9) will arrive shortly, meaning the Birdpark will have 22 king vultures in the future.
    A Inca temple replica has a door with a sign saying "Amazing Amazons - 18 species of Amazons in one temple! When they enter it, they'll see a sign explaining how conservation efforts are helping some species of Amazons parrot. Next to the sign is a webcam of the Birdpark's breeding site in Brazil. The first aviary is also brick-walled as it's in a temple, all aviaries in this temple will have this feature. The bricks will be a dark grey to stand out. The flooring will be woodchips, with couples of sand patches. Leaves will be also scattered. The floor is lushly planted, with lots of logs. The trees will have few leaves, to show how some animals home are being destroyed. The Amazons in this aviary are Cuban amazon (Amazona leucocephala), Bodin's amazon (Amazona festiva bodini) and Hispaniolan amazon (Amazona ventralis). A second aviary with the same design as the first one, holds Red-tailed amazon (Amazona brasiliensis), Yellow-billed amazon (Amazona collaria) and Tucumán amazon (Amazona tucumana)
    The visitor will walk down a torched staircases (stoned), then walk through hanging plastic strips to a mutli-species walkthrough aviary. The aviary has 6 species of amazons. The aviary is a replica of a tribe's village, with trees and plants. The visitors are asked to stay on the dirt path. The huts has typical stuff. The species found here are Black-billed amazon (Amazona agilis), Blue-cheeked amazon (Amazona dufresniana), Blue-fronted amazon (Amazona aestiva), Lilacine amazon (Amazona lilacina), Red-crowned amazon (Amazona viridigenalis) and Red-crowned amazon (Amazona autumnalis)
    The visitors then walk up a second staircase to the remaining aviaries. All of the aviaries are the same design as the walkthrough. There are two aviaries with three species each. The first aviary contains Red-browed amazon (Amazona rhodocorytha), Southern mealy amazon (Amazona farinosa) and Vinaceous amazon (Amazona vinacea). The second and last of the temple aviary contains Red-backed amazon (Amazona festiva festiva), White-fronted amazon (Amazona albifrons) and Yellow-shouldered amazon (Amazona barbadensis)
    The visitors exit the temple by a side next to the entrance side, to resume their exploration of this amazing area. A nicely sized aviary has woodchips mixed with leaves as the flooring, with palms and ferns. The viewing glass is surronded by clay. Trees are placed in the back, the front is mostly water. The aviary holds these 4 wonderful species Toco toucan (Ramphastos toco), Keel-billed toucan (Ramphastos sulfuratus), Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) and Blue-winged macaw (Primolius maracana). A sign next to the aviary shows the toucans species held at Dunfermline BirdPark
    A cafe entitled Amusing Amazon Rainforest is jungle-themed. Visitors will be shocked to see a massive aviary holding 40 species is inside the cafe. The aviary is the same design as the king vulture's but less taller. The species found here are Wattled jacana (Jacana jacana) Resplendent quetzal (Pharomachrus mocinno), Crested quetzal (Pharomachrus antisianus), Purple-throated fruitcrow (Querula purpurata), Red-legged honeycreeper (Cyanerpes cyaneus), Blue dacnis (Dacnis cayana), Violaceous euphonia (Euphonia violacea), Bay-headed tanager (Tangara gyrola), Prong-billed barbet (Semnornis frantzii), Bare-faced currassow (Crax fasciolata), Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias), Grey-winged trumpeter (Psophia creptitans), Blue-crowned motmot (Momotus momota), Pompadour cotinga (Xipholena punicea), Guira cuckoo (Guira guira), Calfbird (Perissocephalus tricolor), Guianian cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus), Ringed teal (Callonetta leucophrys), White-faced
    whistling duck (Dendrocygna viduata), Orinoco goose (Neochen jubata), Northern helmeted currassow (Pauxi pauxi), Chiriqui ground-dove (Geotrygon chiriquensis), Lance-tailed manakin (Chiroxiphia lanceolata), Golden-headed manakin (Pipra erythrocephala), Crested oropendola (Psaracolius decumanus), Green oropendola (Psaracolius viridis), Great tinamou (Tinamus major), Turquiose tanager (Tangara mexicana), Paradise tanager (Tangara chilensis), Blue-necked tanager (Tangara cyanicollis), Chiloe wigeon (Anas sibilatrix), Red-cowled cardinal (Paroaria dominicana), Black-spotted barbet (Capito niger), Blue-headed macaw (Primolius couloni), Tataupa tinamou (Crypturellus tataupa), Great currassow (Crax rubra), Crested currassow (Mitu tomentosa), Wattled guan (Aburria aburri), White woodpecker (Melanerpes candidus), Spangled cotinga (Cotinga cayana), Ocellated turkey (Meleagris ocellata) and Cuban grassquit (Tiaris canorus)
    Finishing eating, the visitors see a row of aviaries for owls, all of them are the same design as the harpy eagles. The owls that the aviaries holds are seen in this order, Striped owl (Pseudoscops clamator), Lesser horned owl (Bubo magellanicus), Mottled owl (Strix virgata), Black-banded owl (Strix huhula), Ferruginous pygmy owl (Glaucidium brasilianum), Western screech owl (Megascops kennicottii), Tropical screech owl (Megascops choliba)
     
  14. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    I'd come visit this zoo!
     
  15. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Busting with 1,530 species of birds!
     
  16. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    Have you had a look at my zoo, the Zoo for Albany?
     
  17. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    No, but I'll read it
     
  18. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Dunfermline, Scotland, UK
    The visitors haven't finished the owl rows, Continuing from the last part, the visitors see Eastern screech owl (Megascops asio), Spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata), Band-bellied owl (Pulsatrix melanota), Chaco owl (Strix chacoensis), Rufous-legged owl (Strix rufipes), Rusty-barred owl (Strix hylophila) and Ashy-faced owl (Tyto glaucops)
    Having finished the owl walk, a raptor walk is up next, again the same design as the owls, the aviaries are spacious and enough to hold up to 20 raptors of each species, the raptor seen here in this order are Chilean blue eagle (Geranoaetus melanoleucus), Black hawk-eagle (Spizaetus tyrannus), Black-and-white hawk-eagle (Spizaetus melanoleucus) and Ornate hawk-eagle (Spizaetus ornatus)
    Visitors walk up to a strange building, it's made of clay! A huge viewing glass reveals a heated and misty jungle with a hut. The top is domed with sprinklers to stimulate a jungle. The substance is woodchips, with loads of fallen trees. Palms and many tropical plants are on the floor. Branches are up high to ensure these colourful birds get plenty of perching places. The birds found here are Andean cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) and 500 Sun conures (Aratinga solstitialis). Next to this aviary is an side aviary, with the same design containing 100 Red-fan parrot (Deroptyus accipitrinus) and Green honeycreeper (Chlorophanes spiza)
    A huge walkthrough dome aviary (50' tall, 170' long and 85' wide, with huts and fallen trees. A naturalistic river flows through it. It holds 950 birds! Many different species are showcased here: Blue-crowned conure (Thectocercus acuticaudatus), Sierra parakeet (Psilopsiagon aymara), White-tipped pigeon (Leptotila verreauxi), Peruvian pigeon (Patagioenas oenops), Long-tailed mockingbird (Mimus longicaudatus), Green jay (Cyanocorax yncas), Carolina wood duck (Aix sponsa), Black-bellied whistling duck (Dendrocygna autumnalis), Amazonian umbrellabird (Cephalopterus ornatus), Striated heron (Butorides striata), Orange-bellied euphonia (Euphonia xanthogaster), Blue-grey tanager (Thraupis episcopus), Sliver-beaked tanager (Ramphocelus carbo), Masked crimson tanager (Ramphocelus nigrogularis) and Yellow-hooded blackbird (Chrysomus icterocephalus)
    Having walked through the massive dome, the visitors see another aviary with the same design as the sun conure's. But this one has a pond and more huts. The species contained in here are Saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola, Black-and-white seedeater (Sporophila luctuosa), Hooded siskin (Spinus magellanica), Collared warbling-finch (Poospiza hispaniolensis) and Blue-and-gold macaw (Ara ararauna)
     
  19. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    A strange sign points to the right. The sign says "Marvellous Macaws waiting for you!" The visitor turn right and see a clay building, dome-roofed. A webcam shows the Birdpark's offshow Lear's macaw breeding area, just near the Rainforest Nursery, a nursery for all birds hatched in the American Rainforest area. Each zone has its own nursery to make sure the birds feel like they're in the wild, with the walls painted to resmble a habitat. The nurseries are used only if a bird parent doesn't incubate the eggs
    Upon entering the macaw house, a sign says that they're acutally walking through series of walkthroughes to see 8 species of macaw in 4 walkthroughs. The first one is tropical planted with a nice substance, with lots of leafy perching area. There is a nice pond, with pebbles and plants (lilies, Hemianthus callitrichoides, Anubias coffeefolia and Echinodorus amazonicus) All of the walkthrough have the same design. The first one has Scarlet macaw (Ara macao) and Red-fronted macaw. The second one has Mexican military macaw (Ara militaris mexicana) and Hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus). The third one has Green-winged macaw (Ara chloropterus) and Green Military macaw (Ara militaris). The fourth and final one has Great green macaw (Ara ambiguus) and Blue-throated macaw (Ara glaucogularis)
    There are side aviaries for more macaw species. All of them has the same design as the walkthroughs, but with a single hut. The first one has Bolivian military macaw (Ara militaris bolivianus), Chestnut-fronted macaw (Ara severus) and Golden-collared macaw (Primolius auricollis). The second one has Colombian green military macaw (Ara militaris militaris) and Hahn's macaw (Diopsittaca nobilis nobilis). The third one has Lichtenstein's noble macaw (Diopsittaca nobilis cumanensis). The fourth one has Red-bellied macaw (Orthopsittaca manilatus)
    There are more side aviaries for more Amazon species that the Birdpark couldn't fit in the endangered display & Amazing Amazons, all of the aviaries are the same as the macaw side aviaries. The first one has Belize yellow-headed amazon (Amazona oratrix belizensis), Grand Cayman amazon (Amazona leucocephala caymanensis) and Grey-naped amazon (Amazona mercenarius canipalliata). The second one has Costa Rica mealy amazon (Amazona guatemalae virenticeps), Diademed amazon (Amazona diadema), Double-headed amazon (Amazona oratrix oratrix) and Honduran amazon (Amazona auropalliata hondurensis). The third one has Greater yellow-headed amazon (Amazona oratrix magna). The fourth one has Lesser white-fronted amazon (Amazona albifrons nana) and Lesser yellow-naped amazon (Amazona auropalliata parvipes). The fifth one has Marajo amazon (Amazona ochrocephala xantholaema), Mexican white-fronted amazon (Amazona albifrons albifrons) and Natterer's amazon (Amazona ochrocephala nattereri)
    The sixth one has Northern mealy amazon (Amazona guatemalae guatemalae) and Orange-winged amazon (Amazona amazonica). The seventh one has Panama amazon (Amazona ochrocephala panamensis), Red-spectacled amazon (Amazona pretrei) and Roatan yellow-naped amazon (Amazona auropalliata caribaea). The eighth one has Salvin's amazon (Amazona autumnalis salvini), Scaly-naped amazon (Amazona mercenarius), St. Lucia amazon (Amazona versicolor) and St. Vincent amazon (Amazona guildingii). The ninth one has Surinam yellow-naped amazon (Amazona ochrocephala ochrocephala) and Yellow-lored amazon (Amazona xantholora).
     
  20. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    While entering Truly Toucans, the visitors discover that the pathway inside the building, is woodchips! The path is 15 feet wide, with plants and trees. Attached to the ceiling are leafy branches. The reason for this is, that there are free-flying toucan species, the others are in the aviaries. I will tell you the free-flying species later. The first enclosure (1,950 sq. ft) has many palms on the floor, which is soil and leaves. Branches at different levels has leaves, to stimulate a rainforest. A pond is in the middle, surronded by rocks. It holds Crimson-rumped toucanet (Aulacorhynchus haematopygus). The group at Birdpark is 6.30, and another offshow group is 3.9, meaning the Birdpark has 48 toucanets.
    A large aviary (5,400 sq.ft) has a nicely-sized river flowing through it, which is rocky, with lots of lilies. Leaves are scattered on the woodchip floor. Palms and other neotropical plants are in the exhibit. Branches are very leafy, to ensure, the toucans get the enough hiding space. The species are: Chestnut-mandibled toucan (Ramphastos ambiguus swainsonii), Collared aracari (Pteroglossus torquatus) and Pale-mandibled aracari (Pteroglossus erythropygius)
    Another large aviary (6,100 sq. ft) is a nice aviary, something that is unbelieveable. The bottom is water, without any land, while the toucans fly over, or perch on the rocks in the water. Many branches are really leafy. While it's feeding time, keepers toss the food on the rocks, which are large and flat. The species are Emerald toucanet (Aulacorhynchus prasinus), Green aracari (Pteroglossus viridis) and Curl-crested aracari (Pteroglossus beauharnaesii)
    A spacious aviary (9,900 sq. ft) is so large that 50% is water and 50% is land, the substance is pebbles (water part) and woodchips (land part) Many neotropical plants (lilies, palms etc.) are in the aviary. Branches are usually attached to the wall in the water part and the trees. the species here are: Ariel toucan (Ramphastos vitellinus ariel), Plate-billed mountain toucan (Andigena laminirostris), Saffron toucanet (Pteroglossus bailloni), Fiery-billed aracari (Pteroglossus frantzii), Red-breasted toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) and Humboldt's lettered aracari (Pteroglossus inscriptus humboldti)
    Free flyings are Red-billed toucan (Ramphastos tucanus), Guyana toucanet (Selenidera piperivora), Black-throated toucanet (Aulacorhynchus atrogularis), Many-banded aracari (Pteroglossus pluricinctus), Ivory-billed aracari (Pteroglossus azara) and Chestnut-eared aracari (Pteroglossus castanotis)
    Upon exitting Truly Toucans, visitors see a replica temple aviary (990 sq. ft) holding Inca toucan (Ramphastos tucanus inca) and Black-necked aracari (Pteroglossus aracari)