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Bornean bearded Pigs (Sus barbatus barbatus) in Captivity

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by German Zoo World, 28 Feb 2021.

  1. German Zoo World

    German Zoo World Well-Known Member

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    The bornean bearded Pig is a very interesting suid Species. Unfortunatly in Europe there is only one left at Berlin Zoo. Are there any more bornean bearded Pigs in captivity.
    Are there some in North American Zoos? Does Singapore Zoo Stil has some?
    What do you think could the bornean bearded Pig at some point like the chacoan Peccari be Importet to more european and North American Zoos.
    I want to know have you Seen bornean bearded Pigs and If so at which Zoo have you Seen them.


    Thank you for your Help

    Your German Zoo World
     
  2. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    Where the Bornean bearded pigs in Europe not no pure-breds.

    BTW: I have seen worrying photographic evidence on line of large numbers of dead wild pigs in these parts of Indonesia/Malaysia. Whereas the species remains numerous, I would not hold my breath over zoonotic diseases and other manmade impacts on their wild populations.
     
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  3. Zooish

    Zooish Well-Known Member

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    The ones held in Singapore are supposedly Sus barbatus oi. They have been on a breeding moratorium for years.
     
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  4. Sarus Crane

    Sarus Crane Well-Known Member

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  5. German Zoo World

    German Zoo World Well-Known Member

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    Thank you very much @Sarus Crane,what do you think will they make their Return to Europe Like the chacoan Peccari did.
     
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  6. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    I would certainly hope that more importance could be given to holding this species in European collections in the future and given the anthropogenic pressures impacting wild populations I think it would be a wise idea.

    I know that EAZA issued a call a couple of years ago for more zoos to keep more endangered suids / peccaries within their collections.

    Personally I saw the last Bornean bearded pigs at ZSL London zoo in 2019 apparently shortly before these elderly animals were euthanized.
     
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  7. Sarus Crane

    Sarus Crane Well-Known Member

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    One can only hope! They would fit in perfectly in Indonesian themed exhibits alongside Orangutans, Gibbons, Anoas and Bantengs so it would be great to include them in the Action Indonesia initiative.
     
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  8. German Zoo World

    German Zoo World Well-Known Member

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    I would Like to See them at Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart as they already have collared Peccari and Sulawesi babirusa, you cant See enough suid Species at a Zoo.
     
  9. German Zoo World

    German Zoo World Well-Known Member

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    That are some sad News why they had to Put them down?
     
  10. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately I can't remember why they were put down but it was mentioned somewhere here in the forum.

    There was a pair of them and they were evidently pretty elderly animals so it could have been something health related and declining quality of life in their twilight years.

    I was quite sad to hear that they were gone as I enjoyed watching them in London and was hoping to see them again there in the future.
     
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  11. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Apparently by that point London had long since stopped breeding them due to these animals being indetermined subspecies.
     
  12. German Zoo World

    German Zoo World Well-Known Member

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    @Onychorhynchus coronatus i would love to See some bearded Pigs in an Mixed Species Habitat together with Banteng and malayan tapir.
     
  13. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    I think the greatest pressure on populations at the moment seems to be overexploitation for bushmeat as the meat of these animals seems to be very popular and of course deforestation through the logging of the forests.

    That said, I do share your concern about the threat of zoonosis as their populations have been devastated historically by rinderpest and there is the threat of the spread of this new African swine fever.
     
  14. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I think that could work and would also be quite nice to see.

    I think that there was a European zoo which kept warty pigs with Indian rhino and the Madrid zoo kept a Malayan tapir with babirusa so these kind of mixed species exhibits can work.
     
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  15. Crowthorne

    Crowthorne Moderator Staff Member

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    They were very elderly and of mixed subspecies, so they would not have been bred from even if they were younger. The herd had diminished significantly in the final few years, from I think around 8 in 2014 to the final two in November 2019. The final pair may have both been male if I remember right.
     
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  16. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    In general, the problem with pigs is their habit of rooting through the substrate: they ought to be able to do it, so I don't like to see them kept on a hard surface, but they can make a real mess on a soft one. Banteng appreciate a pool and Malayan tapirs absolutely need one, but I suspect bearded pigs would rapidly create a muddy mess.
     
  17. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Yes, good point, I do think with tapir it would be more likely to work though.
     
    Last edited: 2 Mar 2021
  18. ZooBinh

    ZooBinh Well-Known Member

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  19. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Given that the few positions for neotropical suids in European zoos are already filled in by babirusa, Visayan warty pigs, RRHs and warthogs, I wouldn't hold my breath on that.
    African swine fever (ASF) isn't "new"; what is new is its increased spread all over the world in the last few years.
    The spread of diseases within wild populations can be just as dreadful even it is not a zoonotic disease. ASF, for example, only affects suids.

    One thing that hasn't been mentioned yet: bearded pigs can be rather vicious. That doesn't mean that other wild suids are sweet harmless pets, but the pig keepers at Zoo Berlin oddly underlined that when talking about them.
     
  20. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Well when it comes to red river hogs and warthogs I would guess that part of the appeal and ubiquity of these species is because of how easy these are kept (not 100% sure on that though) which I think is quite a shame given that neither are of any conservation significance.

    With the Asian suids like the babirusa and Visayan warty pigs these are obviously much more important to maintain in zoos for ex-situ conservation so I do think it is a really positive development that more zoos are keeping them.

    Yes, definitely agree, I didn't mean that it was a novel disease but rather that its spread as an emerging infectious disease is novel and sadly it seems that it has recently arrived in South-East Asia and will in all probability severely impact wild suid populations:

    African swine fever rips through parts of southern Indonesia
     
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