Join our zoo community

Budapest Zoo Walkthrough - February 2015

Discussion in 'Hungary' started by Swedish Zoo Fan, 28 Feb 2015.

  1. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2007
    Posts:
    349
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    I recently visited Hungary, to see the zoos in Budapest and Nyiregyhaza (Sosto) and I got inspired by ThylacineAlive’s amazing walkthrough of Bronx Zoo, so I decided to make my own walkthrough of these zoos.

    I will start with Budapest Zoo & Botanical Garden, the most visited zoo and tourist attraction in Hungary. Will be starting with some general information, and then describe the zoo by the different sections.

    The species lineup is from my visit (February 24, 2015), so there might be some changes after this.

    General Info
    Budapest Zoo & Botanical Garden is located in the City Park (Városliget), located just outside the City Center. It was opened in August 9, 1866 and is therefore one of the oldest in the world. The zoo is 17 hectares and keeps around 1050 species in total. It has around 1 - 1, 5 million visitors every year, and is easily reached with the yellow Metro line from the city. The zoo recently also received more land area when they took over the nearby Amusement Park (more about that later).

    Great Lake and Crocodile House
    After entering the zoo through the Main Entrance, you turn left to start the tour around. There is a small Japanese Garden here, although without any animals. After this, you will find yourself right at the Great Lake, home to many different species of waterfowl. The most notable residents here are the two species of pelicans: Dalmatian Pelican (Pelecanus crispus) and Great White Pelican (Pelecanus onocrotalus).

    Other species include:

    Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo)
    White Stork (Ciconia ciconia)
    Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea)
    Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
    Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)
    Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula)
    Red-breasted Goose (Branta ruficollis)
    Black Swan (Cygnus atratus)
    Red-crested Pochard (Netta rufina)
    Common Shelduck (Tadorna tadorna)

    Next to the lake is also the old Crocodile House. In this small but warm house, you can see a pair of Nile Crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) in an open exhibit and a single Caiman Lizard (Dracaena guianensis) in a smaller exhibit, unfortunately without water. You can see the crocodiles from above and you can also go downstairs to see them under water. Free-ranging in the area around the lake is also a group of Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    Americana Tropicana
    After the lake, you will see the America Tropicana house to your left. You enter the house in the basement, where you will also find the Aquarium. First off, you will see a tank for Ocellate River Stingrays (Potamotrygon motoro). Also here is a small terrarium for Green and black Poison dart frog (Dendrobates auratus), Dyeing Dart Frog (Dendrobates tinctorius) and Yellow-banded Poison dart frog (Dendrobates leucomelas). The main aquarium hall is not very big and pretty run-down but still houses a nice collection. In the largest tank, which actually is pretty small, you can see Silver Arowanas (Osteoglossum bicirrhosum), Arapaimas (Arapaima gigas) and Redtail Catfish (Phractocephalus hemiolopterus). In the other tanks, you can see most of the common aquarium fishes, such as:

    Common Clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris)
    Red Lionfish (Pterois volitans)
    Sailfin Tang (Zebrasoma veliferum)
    Banded Archerfish (Toxotes jaculatrix)
    Banggai Cardinalfish (Pterapogon kauderni)
    Black Pacu (Colossoma macropomum)
    Red-bellied Piranha (Pygocentrus nattereri)
    Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus)
    Electric Eel (Electrophorus electricus)
    Neon Tetra (Paracheirodon innesi)
    Emperor Angelfish (Pomacantus imperator)
    Mandarinfish (Synchiropus splendidus)
    Spot-fin Porcupinefish (Diodon hystrix)
    Longhorn Cowfish (Lactoria cornuta)
    Spotted Garden Eel (Heteroconger hassi)
    Brownbanded Bamboo Shark (Chiloscyllium punctatum)
    Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray (Taeniura lymma)
    Reticulate Whipray (Himantura uarnak)
    Zebra Moray (Gymnomuraena zebra)
    Mediterranean Moray (Muraena helena)
    Laced Moray (Gymnothorax favagineus)
    European Lobster (Homarus gammarus)

    From the aquarium, you take the stairs up to find yourself in the tropical greenhouse where it’s warm and humid. The first animals you meet here is a pair of Rhinoceros Iguanas (Cyclura cornuta) in two separate terrariums. Next to the iguanas is also two terrariums for Argentine Black and White Tegus (Salvator merianae) and Plumed Basilisks (Basiliscus plumifrons). After the reptiles, you will come to a tropical hall where you first see a terrarium for one Green Anaconda (Eunectes murinus) and one Yellow Anaconda (Eunectes notaeus). Next is a small open exhibit for Azara’s Agoutis (Dasyprocta azarae) and also a small aviary for Golden Lion Tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia). There are also a number of free-flying birds in the hall, you can see among others; Giant Wood Rails (Aramides ypecaha), Violet turacos (Musophaga violacea), Lilac-breasted Rollers (Coracias caudatus) and Sunbitterns (Eurypyga helias). Around the hall, there are some smaller themed exhibits. The first exhibit is a mixed exhibit for Linnaeus’s Two-toed Sloths (Choloepus didactylus), Red-handed Tamarins (Saguinus midas), Southern Night Monkeys (Aotus azarae) and Red-footed Tortoises (Chelonoidis carbonaria). When I last visited the zoo in 2013, this was an indoor exhibit for various waderbirds, such as ibises and spoonbills. Now, they were nowhere to be seen as their former outdoor exhibit was housing a single Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus). The other themed exhibits were at my visit a little run-down, as the walkthrough exhibit for Sloths was empty (don’t know why the animals were moved). The themed exhibit called ‘’Chihuahua’’ was closed, so I can’t tell which animals are being kept there. You can also find a small aviary for Emperor Tamarins (Saguinus imperator) and also the exhibit for American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) which they are sharing with Red-tail Catfish here. Also in some smaller terrariums you can see Cane Toads (Rhinella marina) and Knight Anole (Anolis equestris) among others.


    Outside of the house is the former exhibit for Black-tailed Prairie Dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), which was now empty and also the signs are gone so I guess these have left the collection recently. You can also see two smaller tropical houses next; the first one keeps three Giant Otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) in a pretty decent sized indoor exhibit and a good outdoor exhibit as well. One of the better exhibits for this species in Europe, though I think the indoor exhibit should be a little bigger for them. In the other tropical house is the Butterfly Walkthrough, which is only opened in the summer months. Lastly, in this part of the zoo is the new exhibit for a pair of Giant Anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla). Their exhibit held camels before, but is now housing these fascinating animals from South America. You can see the anteater indoor exhibit behind glass, and the outdoor exhibit is made to look like a pampa.​

    - End of part 1 / Swedish Zoo Fan :)
     
  2. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    29 Dec 2014
    Posts:
    703
    Location:
    Dunfermline, Scotland, UK
    What a nice walkthrough review!
     
  3. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2007
    Posts:
    349
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    So guys, here is part two!

    Australia
    Right next to the anteaters is the start of the Australian exhibit, with the brand new exhibit for Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), planned to open for public on March 6, 2015. They had arrived at my visit, and were currently in quarantine. The koalas are two males from Planckendael and Zoo Duisburg. Next to the koalas is the Australia Trail, home to a small group of Red-necked Wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus) and Emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae). This is a walkthrough exhibit, so you can really come up-close to the animals. Here is also the Australia Nightlife house, which starts with an exhibit for Short-beaked Echidnas (Tachyglossus aculeatus) which you can see both outdoor and indoor. Here is also a small nocturnal house with exhibits for Kowaris (Dasyuroides byrnei), Sugar Gliders (Petaurus breviceps), Eastern Quolls (Dasyurus viverrinus) and a single Tasmanian Wombat (Vombatus ursinus tasmaniensis) which is the baby born in 2013. Behind the Outback is also the House for Rescued Birds, where you can see birds rescued from the nature as well as reading about projects in the wild. Here is a small aviary for Cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulates) and oddly enough, an exhibit for South American Coatis (Nasua nasua). The Australia House is next, and you enter the house through a set of doors to find yourself in a small corridor with glass-fronted exhibits on the sides. In these exhibits lives smaller birds and reptiles native to the Australian Outback. Here you can see species such as:

    Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis)
    Australian Ringneck (Barnardius zonarius)
    Blue-faced Parrot Finch (Erythrura trichroa)
    Bronzewing Pigeon (Phaps chalcoptera)
    Diamond Dove (Geopelia cuneata)
    Diamond Firetail (Emblema guttata)
    Eclectus Parrot (Eclectus roratus)
    Little Corella (Cacatua sanguinea)
    Long-tailed Finch (Poephila acuticauda)
    Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus)
    Red-capped Parrot (Purpureicephalus spurius)
    Red-rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus)
    Red-winged Parrot (Aprosmictus erythropterus)
    Regent Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus)
    Rosella (Platycercus eximius)
    Star Finch (Neochmia ruficauda)
    Bearded Dragon (Pogona barbata)
    Frill-necked Lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii)
    Lawson’s Dragon (Pogona henrylawsoni)
    New Guinea Blue-tongued Skink (Tiliqua gigas)
    Northern Velvet Gecko (Oedura castelnaui)
    Solomon Islands Skink (Corucia zebrata)

    In the end of the corridor is the nocturnal part, which you enter through a new pair of doors. This part is one of my favorites in the house, as the animals are free-ranging and you can literally walk with the animals. The species living here are: Brush-tailed Bettong (Bettongia penicillata), Common Brush-tailed Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), Ground Cuscus (Phalanger gymnotis), Sugar Gliders (Petaurus breviceps) and Lyle’s Flying Fox (Pteropus lylei). There is also a small terrarium for White’s Tree Frogs (Litoria caerulea) and a small lightened exhibit with Crested Pigeons (Ocyphaps lophotes).

    After exiting the house, you will come to the outdoor aviaries housing Laughing Kookaburras (Dacelo novaeguineae), Keas (Nestor notabilis) and Hyacinth Macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus). Then, you come to the Wombat house, housing the breeding pair of Tasmanian Wombats (Vombatus ursinus tasmaniensis). They have a pretty nice outdoor exhibit as well as a dark indoor exhibit. They have bred two times, first in 2013 and also 2014. In a small exhibit next to lake is also a small group of Tammar Wallabies (Macropus eugenii). The last exhibits in the Australian zone are for a pair of Southern Cassowaries (Casuarius casuarius), Western Grey Kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and an indoor exhibit for Bateleur Eagles (Terathopius ecaudatus). You can also see the kangaroos and the cassowaries behind glass in their indoor exhibits.

    South America House
    Next to the Outback exhibit is also the small South American exhibit and the nearby aviary with the South America House. In the outdoor exhibit lives Brazilian Tapirs (Tapirus terrestris), Capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), Patagonian Maras (Dolichotis patagonum) and Greater Rheas (Rhea americana). In the house next to the exhibit you can see the animals in their stables, which they share with Azara’s Agoutis (Dasyprocta azarae) and Common Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). Above the house is also the aviary, which the monkeys share together with Blue and Yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna) and Green-winged Macaws (Ara chloroptera).

    - End of part 2, Swedish Zoo Fan :)
     
  4. PAT

    PAT Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    16 Jan 2008
    Posts:
    1,570
    Location:
    Victoria
    Thanks for the awesome walk through :)

    I don't know about anyone else but I always like to open a copy of the zoo' s map when I read a thread like this. I never realized how big Budapest Zoo is.
     
  5. CGSwans

    CGSwans Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Feb 2009
    Posts:
    1,507
    Location:
    Melbourne
    That's an Australian section that would put some of our own zoos to shame. Does Budapest have a legitimate claim to the best Australian collection in the world, outside Australia?
     
  6. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2007
    Posts:
    349
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Not sure if they have a legitimate claim, but they certainly have a fantastic collection. The only thing missing is Tasmanian Devils, then it's perfect! ;)

    Also, here is part three of the walkthrough!

    Waterside Birds & Southeast Asia House
    Next to the South America House is the old Pheasantry, now home to various waterside birds. The house is now closed, so you can only view the birds in their outdoor aviaries. Here you can see among others; Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus), White Spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia), Ringed Teal (Callonetta leucophrys) and Western Crowned Pigeon (Goura cristata). Also in a smaller exhibit you can see a group of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In the end of the aviary row is also the outdoor exhibit for Northern Luzon Giant Cloud Rats (Phloeomys pallidus). Right after the Pheasantry you will arrive at the Southeast Asia House, which was first opened in 1952 then renovated in 2007 to house animals only from Southeast Asia. You enter the house through a pair of doors, and then you can see a small terrarium for Asian Water Dragons (Physignathus cocincinus). Passing through a new pair of doors you find yourself in an open exhibit for free-flying Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus moluccanus). Continuing through another pair of doors you come to another exhibit for various free-flying birds. Here you can see Nicobar Pigeons (Caloenas nicobarica), Torresian Imperial Pigeons (Ducula spilorrhoa), Western Crowned Pigeons (Goura cristata), Brahminy Starlings (Sturnia pagodarum), Bali Starlings (Leucopsar rothschildi), Crested Wood Partridges (Rollulus roulroul), Emerald Doves (Chalcophaps indica) and Zebra Doves (Geopelia striata). In the bird exhibit lives also Malaysian Giant Pond Turtles (Orlitia borneensis) and Red-bellied Short-necked Turtles (Emydura subglobosa) in a small water pond. In two glass-fronted exhibits lives Northern Threeshrews (Tupaia belangeri) and here is also the former Cloud Rat exhibit (now empty, don’t know what will happen to it). The last exhibit in the house is the indoor exhibit for the group of Javan Langurs (Trachypithecus auratus). You can also see the langurs in their outdoor exhibit, right outside of the house.

    Around the Little Rock
    Opposite the Southeast Asia House you will see the Little Rock, which is one of two rocks in Budapest Zoo. At the bottom of the rock there’s a big walk-through aviary with Griffon Vultures (Gyps fulvus), Waldrapps (Geronticus eremita), White-faced Whistling Ducks (Dendrocygna viduata) and oddly enough Indian Crested Porcupines (Hystrix indica). Around the rock is also the exhibit for Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) and Jackass Penguins (Spheniscus demersus). There is also a small aviary for Snowy Owls (Bubo scandiacus) and an exhibit for Kamchatka Brown Bears (Ursus arctos beringianus), which has taken over the old polar bear exhibit. The pool for California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) is located in the front of the bears, and you can also see them both under water. In the rock you can also find the Cave Restaurant.

    Next to the sea lion pool is a small exhibit for a group of European Mouflons (Ovis orientalis). This exhibit earlier housed wolves. Behind the mouflons is the old Owl Castle which though its name doesn’t have any owl exhibits. Although you can see an exhibit for Coypus (Myocastor coypus) and an aviary with Jackdaws (Corvus monedula). Next to the Owl Castle is the House of Wetlands, where you can see different amphibian species. Here you can see among others: Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), European Common Toad (Bufo bufo), European Fire-bellied Toad (Bombina bombina), European Fire Salamander (Salamandra salamandra), Marsh Frog (Pelophylax ridibundus) and European Green Toad (Bufo viridis). Also the House for Native Fish is located here, with species such as Common Roach (Rutilus rutilus), Northern Pike (Esox lucius) and European Eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    - End of part 3, Swedish Zoo Fan :)
     
    Last edited: 4 Mar 2015
  7. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    29 Dec 2014
    Posts:
    703
    Location:
    Dunfermline, Scotland, UK
    Budapest doesn't have Pied Imperial pigeon according to ZTL. They have Torresian imperial pigeon. Are you sure they have Pieds?
     
  8. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2007
    Posts:
    349
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Sorry, my mistake.. I was pretty sure they were Pied Imperial after looking at my pictures, now I see on the zoo's website and ZTL that they are Torresian.. Thanks for noticing and I have changed this in the walkthrough.
     
  9. ralph

    ralph Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Mar 2011
    Posts:
    99
    Location:
    Tilburg, Netherlands
    thank you for this,
    It's finally my turn to visit the zoo on march 18th - can't wait!
     
  10. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2007
    Posts:
    349
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    No problem, I'm sure that you will enjoy the zoo and especially the new Koalas :)

    Also, here I give you part four!

    Madagascar House
    Opposite the House of Wetlands is two big monkey islands, the first is for the group of Golden-bellied Mangabeys (Cercocebus chrysogaster) and the second housed Mandrills at my latest visit in 2013, but was now empty and I don’t know what will happen with it. Next to the islands is the entry to the Madagascar House. In the middle of the house is a big walkthrough exhibit for Ring-tailed Lemurs (Lemur catta). Here you can walk with the lemurs, and they have lots of plants so they can hide from the public if they want. Free-flying in this exhibit is also Madagascar Fody (Foudia madagascariensis), Purple Glossy Starling (Lamprotornis purpureus) and Bernier’s Teal (Anas bernieri). There are also some smaller terrariums for Madagascar Giant Day Geckos (Phelsuma madagascariensis grandis) and Tomato Frogs (Dyscophus antongilii). In the house is also the indoor exhibits for mangabeys, Red-ruffed Lemurs (Varieca rubra) and Black Lemurs (Eulemur macaco). The old Siamang-cage in the end of the house is now empty, and outside the house is also the outdoor exhibit for the lemurs, which I believe is also a walkthrough in the summer months. Opposite the exit from the house is also the big outdoor exhibit for the group of Western Lowland Gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). I will come back to the Great Ape House later.

    India House and Surroundings
    Next to the Madagascar House and the Gorilla exhibit is the India House and the row of exhibits for big carnivores. The exhibit for Asiatic Lions (Panthera leo persica) is the first, unfortunately it isn’t very big. They got four cubs in 2013, and three of them are still living in the zoo. One of the cubs, the male Aslan is now living in Sweden, Parken Zoo in Eskilstuna. Next to the lions is a small exhibit for Mongolian Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) and the two exhibits for Striped Hyenas (Hyaena hyaena), decent exhibits but maybe on the small side. After the hyenas, you come to the entrance to the India House. The first exhibit you see is a glass-fronted exhibit for Masked Lovebirds (Agapornis personatus) and Peach-faced Lovebirds (Agapornis roseicollis). In the house are also the indoor exhibits for Lions and Hyenas.

    Outside of the house again, you can see on your left the small outdoor netted exhibit for Pallas’s Cats (Otocolobus manul). The Persian Leopards (Panthera pardus saxicolor) also have their netted exhibit here, nothing spectacular but good enough for the leopards. Opposite the leopards is the exhibit for Red Pandas (Ailurus fulgens) which have a good exhibit here with lots of high trees. Siberian Tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) are next, with two exhibits. Their exhibits are not very big though, they really could use some more space here. Opposite the tigers is the exhibit for Syrian Brown Bears (Ursus arctos syriacus) which have a pretty decent exhibit here, but also they could need more space. Next to the bears is an exhibit for Blackbucks (Antilope cervicapra) and Bar-headed Geese (Anser indicus). Opposite the antelopes is also a small but nice exhibit for Reeves’s Muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).

    House for Venomous Creatures
    Next to the muntjac exhibit is the entrance to the House for Venomous Creatures which starts with an outdoor exhibit for Burmese Rock Pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) to the right. When entering the house, you will first see the indoor exhibit for Pythons and the exhibit for Aldabra Giant Tortoises (Aldabrachelys gigantea). Upstairs is the collection of venomous snakes, which is one of the best in Europe! Here you can see the following species:

    Forest Cobra (Naja melanoleuca)
    Mexican Moccasin (Agkistrodon bilineatus)
    California Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getulus californiae)
    Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix)
    Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus)
    Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus)
    Eastern Green Mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps)
    Levant Viper (Macrovipera lebetina)
    Long-nosed Viper (Vipera ammodytes)
    Mangrove Snake (Boiga dendrophila)
    Meadow Viper (Vipera ursinii)
    Ottoman Viper (Vipera xanthina)
    Russian Blunt-nosed Viper (Macrovipera lebetina turanica)
    Eyelash Viper (Bothriechis schlegelii)
    Sidewinder (Crotalus cerastes)
    Urutu (Bothrops alternatus)
    West African Gaboon Viper (Bitis gabonica rhinoceros)

    Through glass you can also see their small breeding centre, and Budapest have good breeding results with many of these snake species. When you continue downstairs, you come to the indoor exhibit for a single Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis). The dragon has a nice indoor exhibit, but I’m not sure if it also has an outdoor exhibit. Outside the house is also the exhibit, that housed Babirusas at my visit in 2013, but it was now empty. I don’t know if the pigs were still there or not, but there were no signs at the exhibit so I guess they have left the collection.

    - End of part 4, Swedish Zoo Fan :)
     
  11. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2007
    Posts:
    349
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Sorry for the delay guys, here is part five!

    Holnemvolt Park
    Next to the Venomous Creatures House is a playground, and also the entrance to the African area. You can also enter the nearby Holnemvolt Park here, which is the old Amusement Park, now belonging to the zoo. There are still some amusement rides here, like the Roller Coaster and the Carousel, which are only operating in the summer months. The first animal exhibit is the Aviary for Rescued Birds which kept Monk Parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) and a Steppe Eagle (Aquila nipalensis) at my visit. Behind this is the Petting Zoo which consists of a row of exhibits for various domestic animals. Here you can see West African Pygmy Goats (Capra hircus hircus), Cameroon Sheep (Ovis aries aries), Alpacas (Lama pacos) and Llamas (Lama glama).

    Walking on, you can also see the exhibits for Common Fallow Deer (Dama dama dama), Wild Boars (Sus scrofa) and Ostriches (Struthio camelus). After this, you can see the exhibit for the group of Greater Flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus), as well the exhibits for Slender-tailed Meerkats (Suricata suricatta) and Bactrian Camels (Camelus bactrianus).

    Lastly in this part of the zoo, you can also see the big Farmyard with a nice collection of domestic animals, lots of them are also Hungarian. Here you can see species such as; Domestic Donkey (Equus africanus asinus), Falabella Pony (Equus ferus caballus), Gyimesi Racka Sheep (Ovis aries strepsiceros), Hungarian Pied Cattle (Bos taurus taurus), Hutsul Pony (Equus ferus caballus), Jersey Cattle (Bos taurus taurus), Mangalitsa Pig (Sus scrofa mangalitsa), Tsigai Sheep (Ovis aries tsigai), Dwarf Zebu (Bos taurus indicus), Domestic Goose (Anser anser domesticus), Silkie Bantam Chicken (Gallus gallus bantam), Domestic Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and Domestic Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus). Continuing past the aviary once again, you leave the Holnemvolt Park and find yourself at the entrance to the Savanna House.

    Savanna House + Outdoor exhibit - Elephant House
    Entering the Savanna House, the first exhibit you see is the indoor exhibit for the group of Rothschild’s Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis rothschildi). Unfortunately, it isn’t very big but they breed well here and there was a small baby giraffe to see at my visit, born in February this year. The house consists of a long corridor, with exhibits on the sides. On the right side are the indoor exhibits for the savannah animals, here represented by Dama Gazelles (Nanger dama), Defassa Waterbucks (Kobus ellipsiprymnus), Nyalas (Nyala angasii), Marabou Storks (Leptoptilos crumeniferus), Vulturine Guineafowl (Acryllium vulturinum) and Domestic Guineafowl (Numida meleagris f. domestica). There are also two open exhibits for two small carnivores from Africa, in the form of Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo) and Fennec Foxes (Vulpes zerda).

    On the right side is a long row of terraria for different reptiles, insects and small mammals. Here you can see among others; African Pancake Tortoise (Malacochersus tornieri), Sudan Plated Lizard (Gerrhosaurus major), Savannah Monitor (Varanus exanthematicus), Giant African Millipede (Archispirostreptus gigas), Acacia Rat (Thallomys paedulcus), Cairo Spiny Mouse (Acomys cahirinus) and Zebra Mouse (Lemniscomys barbarus). In a dark room you can also find the exhibit for Aardvarks (Orycteropus afer) and Woodland Dormice (Graphiurus murinus). Before exiting the house, you will also pass by the indoor exhibits for Southern White Rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum simum).

    After exiting the house, you can see the outdoor exhibit for giraffes, rhinos and antelopes, which mostly consists of sand and dirt; there isn’t much grass which is a shame. But the animals have a pretty decent sized exhibit, and except the savannah animals you can also see Egyptian Geese (Alopochen aegyptiaca) here. Next to the savannah is also a small exhibit for Slender-tailed Meerkats (Suricata suricatta), and also an exhibit for Leopard Tortoises (Stigmochelys pardalis) and Egyptian Tortoises (Testudo kleinmanni). In a small aviary lives Southern Ground Hornbills (Bucorvus leadbeateri) and next to this is also a small exhibit for the group of Dholes (Cuon alpinus).

    Going back past the aviary and the meerkats you find yourself at the old Giraffe House which is now home to a group of Grant’s Zebras (Equus quagga boehmi). Here is also an exhibit for Dwarf Mongooses (Helogale parvula). Opposite the zebras is the old Elephant House, which is one of the most beautiful animal houses in the zoo. Here lives the Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus), Common Hippopotamuses (Hippopotamus amphibius) and Yellow Mongoose (Cynictis penicillata). You can see all the animals in their indoor exhibits in the house and also their outdoor exhibits are located around the house. The indoor exhibits for elephants and hippos are all on the small side, and the outdoor exhibit for the hippos isn’t anything spectacular either.

    The elephant exhibit is decently sized, but they will soon get a new exhibit in the Holnemvolt Park, where the zoo will build a huge new Biodome with elephants, chimpanzees, manatees, crocodiles and a big aquarium with sharks and rays. The project is scheduled to be finished in 2018-2019.

    - End of part 5, Swedish Zoo Fan :)
     
  12. ralph

    ralph Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Mar 2011
    Posts:
    99
    Location:
    Tilburg, Netherlands
    Visited Budapest zoo this week. Only one month after your visit, there's some things different already.

    - The zoo no longer keeps marabu storks
    - The exhibit in the India house now houses plumheaded parakeets. The lovebirds were now kept in the Savanna house
    - The crested pigeon exhibit in the Australia house now housed some Australian finches. Pigeons moved to the parrot enclosure.
    - There are no more toads or frogs in the Wetlands house. Instead there are some species of mouse kept there now. (Harvest, steppe, striped field and yellow-necked). The fire salamander and ribbed newt were the only amphibians left in the entire house, along with some fishes and dice snake.
    - No more Urutu (Bothrops alternatus) to be seen in the Venomous Creatures house.

    Did you forget to mention the Feathertail gliders in the Australia House or were they not there on your visit?
     
  13. threeple61

    threeple61 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    7 Apr 2014
    Posts:
    121
    Location:
    Great Blue Yonder
    Torresian Imperial Pigeons (Ducula spilorrhoa) are labelled as pied imperial pigeons from all accounts. A very subtle difference to the much more frequently encountered Pied (D.bicolor). The torresian species has a yellow bill, a slightly different (greyer) plumage and there is difference to the colouration of the under-tail. Many experienced aviculturists have failed to notice this difference so understandable...

    No lesser green broadbills?
     
  14. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2007
    Posts:
    349
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Thanks! Interesting with so many differences in only one month..
    Didn't see any Feathertail Gliders on my visit.. Were they kept in the Nocturnal Part of the Australia House? I hope you enjoyed the zoo!
     
  15. ralph

    ralph Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Mar 2011
    Posts:
    99
    Location:
    Tilburg, Netherlands
    Yes, the were kept in an noctural enclosure before the actual walkthrough part.

    The pigeon is indeed labeled as pied imperial pigeon, but it IS an torresian Imperial pigeon.

    There are no more broadbills unfortunately.
     
  16. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    16,333
    Location:
    omnipresent
    it is a very good Australian section, but the non-Australian species are odd inclusions aren't they? I can overlook the species from New Guinea and surrounding islands of course (even New Zealand!), but there are a few like bataleur eagles, Lyle's flying foxes and coatis which are just strange.
     
  17. DDcorvus

    DDcorvus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18 Aug 2008
    Posts:
    1,167
    Location:
    everywhere and nowhere

    The flying foxes are the odd one (like the monk parakeets, who were last time I visited in an aviary outside not connected to the Australia part), but the coatis are a "left-over" from the recent expansion. Until recently the walkthrough enclosure with the wallabies and with the nocturnal houses for the echidnas, kowaris and quolls was the zoo's petting zoo. So to make a more coherent it will need some time, even though there might be no concrete plans to move to coatis.

    And isn't New Zealand part of Australia!!?
     
  18. ralph

    ralph Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    11 Mar 2011
    Posts:
    99
    Location:
    Tilburg, Netherlands
    The coati enclosure would be a great location for an enclosure for tree kangaroos :p
    (Not hinting at anythere here, just wishfull thinking)
     
  19. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    16,333
    Location:
    omnipresent
    ah I see. That is acceptable then; I didn't realise it was a transitional effect.
     
  20. Tyger56

    Tyger56 New Member

    Joined:
    1 Aug 2015
    Posts:
    1
    Location:
    Darlington, England
    Hi, Does anybody know what happened to the sloths? I first visited Budapest zoo in July 2014 and the walkthrough sloth enclosure was the highlight of my holiday. I visited the zoo again on Wednesday and the sloth enclosure was closed and empty. I spotted a couple of sloths curled up and sleeping in another enclosure which wasn't a walkthrough one. I really only returned to the zoo to see the sloths again so I was really disappointed. :(