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Bush Dogs in North American Zoos

Discussion in 'United States' started by snowleopard, 28 Feb 2009.

  1. snowleopard

    snowleopard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Are bush dogs being phased out of North American collections? There are only 5 U.S. zoos with the species (Oklahoma City, San Antonio, Palm Beach, Little Rock and St. Louis) and yet there have been a number of high-profile South American zones recently created in zoos. Why aren't more zoos exhibiting such unusual and potentially popular animals?
     
  2. mstickmanp

    mstickmanp Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you Scott, I don't get why zoos have not included Bush Dogs in their new South American exhibits either. Are they being phased out?
     
  3. snowleopard

    snowleopard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    There are lots of other interesting mammals that are rarely exhibited in North American collections. Two more examples: I could find only 3 zoos on ISIS with aardwolves (Brookfield, Montgomery and San Antonio) and only 2 zoos with raccoon dogs (Red River and Omaha). It's time for a European zoo tour!!!
     
  4. Ituri

    Ituri Well-Known Member

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    I don't think bush dogs have ever been that common. There is not an SSP or PMP for them, but I don't know if there is any kind of phase-out recomendation from the Canid TAG. As far as aardwolves and raccoon dogs, populations are too low and with no real conservation need for either species, I can't imagine any recommendation other than phase-out for them. If someone can give us more information I'd be very interested to hear it.
     
  5. BlackRhino

    BlackRhino Well-Known Member

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    Lowry Park Zoo has a large pack of Aardwolves.
     
  6. Hippopotamus

    Hippopotamus Well-Known Member

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    They're actually striped hyenas.
     
  7. okapikpr

    okapikpr Well-Known Member

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    And this is how rumors are started....the current population of Bush Dogs is just not big enough to have an SSP/PMP. They will be maintained as a DERP with a studbook until the population grows and there is more institutional interest....there is talk of working with European zoos to create a more international program.
     
  8. The KCZooman

    The KCZooman Well-Known Member

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    I don't known about the decisions regarding the future of aardwolves and bushdogs, but I read somewhere once that it was illegal for raccoon dogs to be imported to the United States. I don't know how Omaha found a loophole to recieve their animals, but I do know that some of their cubs went to the Red River Zoo in Fargo.
     
  9. Meaghan Edwards

    Meaghan Edwards Well-Known Member

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    I would love to see Bush Dogs; they're on my list of species I'd love to see. They're on my wishlist of animals to be at the Toronto Zoo; I think they'd do nicely in the existing jaguar exhibit when the Americas pavilion gets redone.
     
  10. Pacarana

    Pacarana Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to bring up an old thread but I've recently been very curious about the population of bush dogs in US zoos. I am headed to San Antonio in a couple months, so I have been researching if the zoos still holds them. However, as most of us know, American zoo websites are usually unreliable when regarding species advertised at the zoo. Maybe because of a lack of interest to update the webpage?

    Either way, I have been researching where in the States you can still see these amazing carnivores. Here is what I found so far:

    Palm Beach Zoo (1.1 breeding pair) -- News article from 2018 states flood killed the other pair
    Stone Zoo (?) -- Video of mother and litter posted on youtube Jan. of this year
    Atlanta Zoo (0.0.2) -- Instagram page
    Saint Luis Zoo (?) -- 2017 facebook post by former director mentions bush dogs at zoo
    Detroit Zoo (1.1 siblings) -- 2017 Valentine's Day blog post
    San Antonio Zoo (0.0.2) -- May 2018 Facebook post
    Little Rock Zoo (?) -- March 2019 youtube video

    From what I found, it looks like the only zoo that might not hold the species anymore is Oklahoma City Zoo. However, Stone Zoo, Detroit, and Atlanta are new holders of the species since this thread was last posted in. Which is good news, especially with the birth of the litter at Stone Zoo this year! But it looks like there are not many breeding pairs available in the States and the pair that died in 2018 from the Florida floods would be a big set back to bush dog keepers.

    Does anyone have any information I left out or anything that would be nice to add? I wonder why the species is so rare in US zoos? They seem to breed frequently by European standards and from the videos I have seen, seem somewhat active for a small, burrowing carnivore! Truly a shame that more South American exhibits in the US don't exhibit the species. Lack of interest and lack of availability probably have a lot to do with it, but many drab SA exhibits would be so enriched with such a peculiar and fun species!
     
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  11. Pleistohorse

    Pleistohorse Well-Known Member

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    Sequoia Park Zoo holds Bush Dogs. In 2016 they had two (maybe three) males.
     
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  12. Pacarana

    Pacarana Well-Known Member

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    That's great to hear! I wonder if those are the only bush dogs in the Western US? Most other bush dogs seem to be in Midwestern and Southern zoos.
     
  13. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member

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    They are and I believe the zoo has advertised them that way in the past.

    They can produce a lot of offspring, but pairing animals and consistent reproduction are both issues in captivity, at least in North America. The population is also small and is thus genetically and demographically unstable. Ideally they would increase the population to a more viable number (~50 or more) and operate it in conjunction with the European, Japanese, and Latin American populations; however, they need more zoos to have them first and there doesn't seem to be much interest. Not sure why, but availability and unfamiliarity are potential reasons.
     
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  14. michaelarthur

    michaelarthur Active Member

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    THe SSP is working the the EEP pretty closely to learn more and to broaden the genetic diversity. Little Rock has a female that was imported from Germany, no breeding success yet that I’m aware of.
     
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  15. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member

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    Even European population of Busch Dogs has its problems. This species breeds pretty quickly. So some time ago oversupply and lack of new places led to decision by a lot of zoos to simply stop breeding at the same time. The population aged and crashed and at the same time it went through severe genetical bottleneck. Some imports (from Japan etc-) and stubborness of few individual zoos helped to bring the program back on track to some degree. But it continuosly fights with lack of interest of new holders. European zoos are undergoing the same process as zoos in Australia or the US - they keep ever fewer species at larger areas and so holding capacity at traditional zoos is shrinking. Economic recovery in Eastern Europe that leads more zoos there to increase their quality and reach EAZA standards helps to offset this trend a little but not enough.
     
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  16. Krexotics

    Krexotics Member

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    Alexandria zoological park in Louisiana had an older pair but now they only have one left.