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Chlidonias Goes To Asia, part six: 2019

Discussion in 'Asia - General' started by Chlidonias, 7 Dec 2019.

  1. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    It's always nice to receive a compliment :D
     
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  2. FunkyGibbon

    FunkyGibbon Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to try for Dugongs in Sarawak; supposedly they are easily seen from boat tours in the mangroves around Kuching. (Hopefully a bit cheaper even than 50 AUD)
     
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  3. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Really? That doesn't sound right. Where did you hear about that?
     
  4. FunkyGibbon

    FunkyGibbon Well-Known Member

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    Ignore me, I am thinking of Irrawaddy dolphin :p
     
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  5. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh, right, that makes more sense. You should do that - Irrawaddy Dolphins are awesome!
     
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  6. MRJ

    MRJ Well-Known Member

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    Yes but then I realised how uninteresting you are as a stalking subject... ;)

    Actually I thought it just showed that we are both connoisseurs of classy wildlife viewing locations.
     
  7. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    That's harsh! I usually get rave reviews from my stalkers!
     
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  8. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    DAY THIRTY-ONE - the one with the falcon-nightjar hybrid


    Finally I found a proper birdy place in Brisbane! I got to Oxley Creek Common at 7.30am and there were birds everywhere. By the time I left I had seen 45 species. Some people I met said that they came here regularly and today was a quiet morning! The problem with Brisbane (when I was there) is that it was getting light at 5am, so being anywhere at dawn would require a ridiculous start-time. Nevertheless I decided that I would do just that and come back here the next morning as early as possible to see how many more birds I could see. I just wish I'd come here on my first day though so that I'd have had more time to plan around it - tomorrow would be my last day before I headed down to the Gold Coast where my flight left from.

    Oxley Creek Common is an easy place to reach from the central city. Just catch the train to Sherwood Station (about a twenty minute ride from Central Station), then turn left and walk for about two kilometres along Sherwood Road, crossing a second set of train tracks and then Oxley Creek, and the entrance is on your right about 100m past the creek. The Sherwood Arboretum (which I visited a couple of days before) is in the area as well, except you turn right from the station.

    The layout of the Common is pretty simple. When you first arrive there is a carpark and the "red barn complex" from which the track leads off parallel to the creek. It is paved for a short distance then becomes a dirt track. On your left are fields and on your right a strip of forest along the creek. The track runs for a couple of kilometres, ending at a Hoop Pine plantation. The first half of the track has a lot of birds in it because of the diversity of habitat. For example, the stretch of long grass which runs between the track and the paddocks is home to Tawny Grassbirds and Golden-headed Cisticolas (I didn't see the latter until the next morning though); the fields beyond had open-country birds like Black-shouldered and Black Kites; and the forest along the creek had Brown and Lewin's Honeyeaters, Superb Blue and Red-backed Fairy Wrens, and Brown Quail. The second half of the track isn't very interesting - it is mostly too open - although this is where I saw the first Red-browed Firetails of the trip. Something I found particularly interesting was that all the corvids at Oxley Creek Common were Australian Ravens. The default corvid in Brisbane is the Torresian Crow, so that was what I assumed the ones here were too, until I heard them calling and took a closer look at them.

    [​IMG]
    Male Red-backed Fairy-Wren

    [​IMG]
    Female Red-backed Fairy-Wren


    The best part of the Common is a side-track which branches off about halfway along and leads to two small "lagoons". This track is basically a straight road through open fields but seemed much birdier than the open fields which the second half of the main track leads through. I saw my first ever Pallid Cuckoo along here, just a fantastic bird which confused me as to what it even was, looking like some mixed-up hybrid between a falcon and a nightjar. Also my first ever Double-barred Finches - also known as Owl Finches - which are brilliant little birds.

    [​IMG]
    Pallid Cuckoo

    [​IMG]
    Double-barred Finches


    Of the lagoons, one was half-empty but was hosting flocks of Glossy Ibis as well as a pair of Black-fronted Dotterels and some more common birds (White-eyed Ducks, Pacific Black Ducks, Purple Swamphens, Pied Stilts, etc), and I got my first ID-able looks at a martin for the trip. I was seeing a lot of martins while in Brisbane but always in situations where I can't ID them - I'm on a train, or they are too high in the air, or whatever. Here I could say with certainty that I was looking at Fairy Martins.

    The walk back to the train station seemed to take longer than going in the other direction - it is uphill somewhat - but when I passed a doctors which had a temperature-clock outside I realised the problem was that it was 34 degrees already! I had half-heartedly being tossing about whether I should go back to the Arboretum, seeing it was so close, but given that I had seen very little on the other afternoon when I'd visited and that today was even hotter, I decided to leave any further birding activities until tomorrow morning.


    Animals seen today:

    BIRDS:
    Feral Pigeon Columba livia
    Grey Butcherbird Craciticus torquatus
    Rainbow Lorikeet Trichoglossus haematodus
    Australian Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen
    Straw-necked Ibis Threskiornis spinicollis
    Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes
    Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis
    Australian White Ibis Threskiornis molucca
    Greater Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita
    Australian White Ibis Threskiornis molucca
    Masked Lapwing Vanellus miles
    Blue-faced Honeyeater Entomyzon cyanotis
    Australian Brush Turkey Alectura lathami
    Australian Raven Corvus coronoides
    Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    Australian Black-shouldered Kite Elanus axillaris
    Willy Wagtail Rhipidura leucophrys
    Welcome Swallow Hirundo neoxena
    Magpie-Lark Grallina cyanoleuca
    Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    Black Kite Milvus migrans
    Tawny Grassbird Cincloramphus timoriensis
    Brown Honeyeater Lichmera indistincta
    Sacred Kingfisher Todiramphus sanctus
    Red-backed Fairy Wren Malurus melanocephalus
    Galah Cacatua roseicapilla
    Superb Blue Wren Malurus cyaneus
    Pallid Cuckoo Cacomantis pallidus
    Lewin's Honeyeater Meliphaga lewinii
    Intermediate Egret Egretta intermedia
    Purple Swamphen Porphyrio porphyrio
    White-eyed Duck Aythya australis
    Pacific Black Duck Anas superciliosa
    Glossy Ibis Plegadis falcinellus
    Little Black Shag Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
    Brown Falcon Falco berigora
    Common Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae
    Black-fronted Dotterel Elseyornis melanops
    White-headed (Pied) Stilt Himantopus leucocephalus
    Fairy Martin Hirundo ariel
    Double-barred (Owl) Finch Taeniopygia bichenovii
    Brown Quail Coturnix ypsilophora
    Red-browed Firetail Neochmia temporalis
    White-faced Heron Ardea novaehollandiae
    Black-faced Cuckoo-Shrike Coracina novaehollandiae
    Noisy Miner Manorina melanocephala
    Silver Gull Larus novaehollandiae

    MAMMALS:
    None

    REPTILES:
    Eastern Water Dragon Physignathus lesueurii
     
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  9. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    DAY THIRTY-TWO - the one with all the birds


    Yesterday I had discovered that the Oxley Creek Common was not only an excellent birding spot but that the morning I was there was, apparently, "pretty quiet". As I had seen 45 species that morning I wanted to go back and see what it was like if I got there early enough for it not to be "quiet". Taking the earliest train I could, I arrived at the reserve at 5.30am, just half an hour after sunrise and two hours earlier yesterday's arrival time. This did indeed seem to make a big difference. Not only did were there a lot more birds in general but the number of species I saw was also considerably higher, with sixty species ticked off by the time I left. The day as a whole was the most successful of the trip in terms of numbers, with 72 bird species seen in total.

    There was a bit of a surprise right at the start with a young Brushtail Possum sitting by the "red barn". I have no idea what it was doing out in the daytime, and its presence was certainly not appreciated by the Grey Butcherbird who kept dive-bombing it. Just afterwards I came across another nocturnal animal, although this one was a Tawny Frogmouth sitting in a tree pretending to be a branch as they are wont to do.

    [​IMG]
    Common Brushtail Possum

    [​IMG]
    Tawny Frogmouth

    The first half of the track was even better than yesterday, with Brown Quail being vastly more apparent than the day before and there just being more of all the birds in general. I saw a number of cisticolas which I had missed the previous day. Other birds which I hadn't seen yesterday and which were new for the trip-list included Fan-tailed Cuckoo, Olive-backed Oriole, White-winged Triller and Golden Whistler. The Pallid Cuckoo was still in the same area as before. In the weedy lagoon I spotted a lifer Latham's Snipe (apparently commonly seen here) and the larger lagoon had Australian Pelicans, Darters and Great Cormorants amongst the usual ducks. I was really pleased with how the morning turned out.

    [​IMG]
    Brown Quail

    [​IMG]
    Golden-headed Cisticola


    Despite not having seen much at the Sherwood Arboretum when I'd been on one of the previous afternoons, I had been going to return there briefly today anyway; and then I was going to go to Mt. Coot-Tha where there was supposed to be a chance of seeing Powerful Owls roosting. But while at Oxley Creek Common I had a chat to two ladies who were wandering through, and they mentioned that Crested Bellbirds were common at a place called Enoggera Reservoir. I have never seen Crested Bellbirds - and I wanted to. Should I go for a slim chance of Powerful Owls at Mt. Coot-Tha, or a high chance of Crested Bellbirds at the Enoggera Reservoir? I went with the bellbirds. Now, the Slater field-guide cuts out the eastern coast on their distribution map for the Crested Bellbird but their maps can't always be trusted (cough... Brown Honeyeater!) and the two ladies were very specific on these being Crested Bellbirds and how they were common at the lake. I decided to skip the arboretum and head directly back to the city so that I could find out how to get to this lake.

    The info centre in the city was most helpful - it turns out that the Enoggera Reservoir is well-known and not some obscure location as I had thought it might be, and there is a bus (the #385) which goes straight there from town. The lake is quite large with a track running right around it through forest. I think it would likely be an exceptionally good birding spot in the early morning - probably not as good as Oxley Creek Common because there is less of a range in the habitats, but there would be a lot of proper forest birds there. Because I was there in the middle of the day I only saw a few birds, the best of which were Large-billed Scrubwren and White-throated Treecreeper. An extra bird bonus were the Comb-crested Jacanas strutting around on the rafts of floating vegetation.

    And what of the Crested Bellbirds? Well, soon after I arrived I started hearing the distinctive metallic chiming of Bell Miners and knew immediately that there had been a fatal error in the ladies' use of bird names...

    Still, it wasn't a waste of time going there because I did see some other nice birds, even if nothing "new", and I happily discovered that this was where the Walkabout Creek Discovery Centre was located. I wrote a little review and species list here: Walkabout Creek species list, October 2019 [Walkabout Creek Discovery Centre]

    Also extremely noteworthy was a lifer snake! While walking back to the bus stop I came across this beautiful Carpet Python crossing the path.

    [​IMG]


    My day was not yet done. I had failed to find a Greater Glider the night before last and this was my last chance. The writer of the trip report I mentioned in that post had found the gliders easily, or so they had implied. And thus I found myself back on a train to Cleveland. Dusk had already fallen when I got to the Greater Glider Conservation Area. On the walk to the reserve I saw Black Flying Foxes flapping overhead, with enough light still to see which species they were (on my previous visit I had only seen them after dark).

    In contrast to the last visit, on this evening I saw three Common Ringtail Possums (none last time), and it wasn't until I was three-quarters of the way around the loop track that I encountered the first Common Brushtail and I only saw one other after that. Also there were Cane Toads all around the track whereas last time I hadn't seen any at all (their absence was something I had specifically noticed because they had been so common at the Deagon Wetlands in Sandgate).

    Finally, when my time was almost up, I got some eye-shine in the top of a massive eucalyptus and saw a huge possum staring down at me. That had to be a Greater Glider just from size alone. I hi-fived myself mentally (not physically because that would be weird). The possum didn't move. I kept looking at it. Greater Glider - had to be. Honestly I wasn't convinced. I moved around the tree, trying to get a side view without the branch it was on obscuring the body. No good. I went back to the front. It just looked wrong. The ears were wrong. I could see the end of the tail poking out behind the branch, and it looked wrong. But it was far too big to be a Brushtail Possum. I spent twenty minutes staring at the damn thing through binoculars but because it wasn't moving the view wasn't changing anything. I was pretty sure it had to be a Brushtail, but it was a monster. Eventually I had to leave because if I missed the bus there was no way to get back to the city after the last train. Final assessment: not a Greater Glider. Or if it was I don't want to know. I checked some photos online afterwards to reassure myself and I'm positive it had to have been a ginormous Brushtail Possum.

    I made it back to the bus stop with ten minutes to spare.

    The reserve does seem like it would be a "reliable" place to try and see Greater Gliders. If I were to go back to Brisbane (which is likely if Air Asia retains the Bangkok-to-Brisbane route) then I will go back there. In fact I'd see if I could find a hostel in Cleveland or closer, so that I could stay in the reserve for longer without having to worry about missing the last train back to the city.


    Animals seen today:

    BIRDS:
    Rainbow Lorikeet Trichoglossus haematodus
    Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    Australian Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen
    Magpie-Lark Grallina cyanoleuca
    Australian White Ibis Threskiornis molucca
    Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis
    Greater Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita
    Australian Brush Turkey Alectura lathami
    Masked Lapwing Vanellus miles
    Noisy Miner Manorina melanocephala
    Australian Wood Duck Chenonetta jubata
    Tawny Frogmouth Podargus strigoides
    Grey Butcherbird Craciticus torquatus
    Spangled Drongo Dicrurus bracteatus
    Tawny Grassbird Cincloramphus timoriensis
    Brown Honeyeater Lichmera indistincta
    Superb Blue Wren Malurus cyaneus
    Brown Quail Coturnix ypsilophora
    Pied Currawong Strepera graculina
    Fan-tailed Cuckoo Cacomantis flabelliformis
    Olive-backed Oriole Oriolus sagittatus
    Sacred Kingfisher Todiramphus sanctus
    Golden-headed Cisticola Cisticola exilis
    Red-browed Firetail Neochmia temporalis
    Bar-shouldered Dove Geopelia humeralis
    Straw-necked Ibis Threskiornis spinicollis
    Pallid Cuckoo Cacomantis pallidus
    Black-faced Cuckoo-Shrike Coracina novaehollandiae
    Willy Wagtail Rhipidura leucophrys
    Lewin's Honeyeater Meliphaga lewinii
    Australian Raven Corvus coronoides
    Galah Cacatua roseicapilla
    Intermediate Egret Egretta intermedia
    Red-backed Fairy Wren Malurus melanocephalus
    Double-barred (Owl) Finch Taeniopygia bichenovii
    Blue-faced Honeyeater Entomyzon cyanotis
    Welcome Swallow Hirundo neoxena
    White-headed (Pied) Stilt Himantopus leucocephalus
    Pacific Black Duck Anas superciliosa
    Fairy Martin Hirundo ariel
    Black-fronted Dotterel Elseyornis melanops
    Glossy Ibis Plegadis falcinellus
    Latham's Snipe Gallinago hardwickii
    White-faced Heron Ardea novaehollandiae
    Australian Pelican Pelecanus conspicillatus
    Australian Darter Anhinga novaehollandiae
    Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo
    Little Black Shag Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
    Dusky Moorhen Gallinula tenebrosa
    White-eyed Duck Aythya australis
    Grey Teal Anas gracilis
    Australian Black-shouldered Kite Elanus axillaris
    Eastern Whipbird Psophodes olivaceus
    White-winged Triller Lalage tricolor
    Grey Shrike-Thrush Colluricincla harmonica
    Golden Whistler Pachycephala pectoralis
    Common Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae
    Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    Australasian Pipit Anthus novaeseelandiae
    Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes
    Australian King Parrot Alisterus scapularis
    Common Coot Fulica atra
    Australian Little Grebe Tachybaptus novaehollandiae
    Comb-crested Jacana Jacana gallinacea
    Brown Thornbill Acanthiza pusilla
    White-browed Scrubwren Sericornis frontalis
    Large-billed Scrubwren Sericornis magnirostris
    Bell Miner Manorina melanophrys
    White-throated Treecreeper Cormobates leucophaeus
    Brown Falcon Falco berigora
    Torresian Crow Corvus orru
    Noisy Friarbird Philemon corniculatus

    MAMMALS:
    Common Brush-tailed Possum Trichosurus vulpecula
    Black Flying Fox Pteropus alecto
    Red-necked Wallaby Macropus rufogriseus
    Common Ringtail Possum Pseudocheirus peregrinus

    REPTILES:
    Eastern Water Dragon Physignathus lesueurii
    Carpet Python Morelia spilota

    AMPHIBIANS:
    Cane Toad Rhinella marinus
     
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  10. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    DAY THIRTY-THREE - the one with the end of the trip


    The last full day of the trip! Early tomorrow morning I would be flying back to New Zealand from the Gold Coast Airport (it is much cheaper to fly from Gold Coast than from Brisbane itself), so I had to make my way down there today and stay overnight.

    The travel between the two cities is easy enough - there is a train direct from Central Station in Brisbane to Varsity Lakes Station at the Gold Coast, which takes 1.5 hours and costs AU$14, and then you just take a bus from the station to where-ever you're going. On this morning the train took two hours due to "congestion" and also a truck accident on a bridge; not sure why a road accident would delay the train but it did. I saw quite a lot of birds from the train - on the list below everything up to Dollarbird was seen on the way.

    I had booked at the Coolongatta YHA. This is literally right next to the airport - it takes about five minutes to walk from the hostel to the airport entrance. I'd got a single room here for NZ$46 which is more than I'd normally like to pay but it was only $20 more than a bed in an eight-person dorm, and it was only for one night, so I considered it a better price in relative terms. Of the four pre-booked accommodations of the trip (in Sydney, Singapore, Brisbane, and Gold Coast) this was the only one I liked and the only one which I'd recommend staying at. Also it is obviously very convenient if you are flying in or out through this airport. There isn't much in the general vicinity apart for the airport though. There's a cafe directly across the road, if you are happy paying AU$16 for a fancy sandwich, but there are various cheaper places for food outside the airport entrance.

    My plan for the day had initially been to go birding at Schuster Park and then walk a few kilometres from there to the David Fleay Wildlife Park. The #760 bus was a convenient route on this day - it runs from the train station all the way to the YHA and airport, it passes close to Schuster Park, and I also discovered that it runs directly past Currumbin Sanctuary (i.e. you could visit Currumbin easily as a day-trip from Brisbane, by taking the train to Varsity Lakes and then the #760 bus direct to Currumbin).

    In the end I only visited Schuster Park. Firstly, I didn't get checked in at the YHA until long after I had anticipated - the confirmation email had said that check-in was from 11am, which apparently was not the case, but the manager wasn't there anyway so I had to wait over an hour for her return, meaning that I couldn't get out of there until after midday. Secondly I had to get the unused money from my Go-Card refunded which couldn't be done at the airport (you can buy a Go-Card at the Gold Coast Airport but not get a refund there, which is really inconvenient), so I had to go across town to the Pacific Fair Shopping Centre in Broadbeach but this had to be done at the end of the day yet not so late that the shop there would be closed. It all meant I only had time for one thing - birding, or one of the two zoos. I went with the birding, because I was still hoping to find a Mangrove Honeyeater.

    Schuster Park had sounded like a fantastic birding spot on one document I'd seen - "a large park comprising mature native trees, mangroves, paperbark and water-lilies" - but I found it disappointing. It seemed more like a dog park and picnic area. There were also some police in there arresting someone. Just after arrival I saw my first female Australian Koel (I have only seen males before - the females are dramatically different to the females of Asian Koels). I followed the paths heading to my right where there should have been swampy areas - not present due to drought conditions - and eventually found a track leading into a mangrove reserve. A sign at the entrance had a photo of a Mangrove Honeyeater on it! I spent the rest of my day wandering around in this area. No honeyeaters were seen. I ran into a local birder who said he had never seen one in this park. He was there to try and find a pair of Powerful Owls which had been reported - they couldn't be found either. I did see a Shining Cuckoo to add to the list. Much better was a male Cicadabird, which was a lifer - it's kind of like a much more elegant-looking cuckoo-shrike, and I felt I'd rather have seen that than the Mangrove Honeyeater because it is more singular than just another honeyeater.

    As I left the park I spotted a Whistling Kite gliding about high in the sky. It is probably a fitting Zoochat ending to have the last Brisbane bird of the trip be a Whistling Kite.

    The Pacific Fair Shopping Centre is about half an hour by bus from the YHA. There are only a couple of places on the Gold Coast which do refunds on Go-Cards, and this was the easiest for me to reach. It was dusk by now, so of course there were flying foxes flapping through the sky over the mall. I got AU$40 back on the refund (including the AU$10 initial cost of buying the card), meaning I had spent about AU$60 on transport over six days. I guess this is okay considering I took quite a few long train trips. Probably not really okay if you were living there and having to spend that amount every week to get around though.


    Animals seen today:

    BIRDS:
    Masked Lapwing Vanellus miles
    Welcome Swallow Hirundo neoxena
    Fairy Martin Hirundo ariel
    Rainbow Lorikeet Trichoglossus haematodus
    Australian Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen
    Pied Butcherbird Craciticus nigrogularis
    Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    Noisy Friarbird Philemon corniculatus
    Torresian Crow Corvus orru
    Australian Raven Corvus coronoides
    Noisy Miner Manorina melanocephala
    Feral Pigeon Columba livia
    Common Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae
    Australian Wood Duck Chenonetta jubata
    Australian White Ibis Threskiornis molucca
    Straw-necked Ibis Threskiornis spinicollis
    Magpie-Lark Grallina cyanoleuca
    Dollarbird Eurystomus orientalis
    Silver Gull Larus novaehollandiae
    Pied Currawong Strepera graculina
    Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes
    White-faced Heron Ardea novaehollandiae
    Purple Swamphen Porphyrio porphyrio
    Australian Brush Turkey Alectura lathami
    Australian Koel Eudynamys orientalis
    Sacred Kingfisher Todiramphus sanctus
    Olive-backed Oriole Oriolus sagittatus
    Shining Cuckoo Chrysococcyx lucidus
    Superb Blue Wren Malurus cyaneus
    Cicadabird Coracina [Edolisoma] tenuirostris
    Australian Figbird Sphecotheres vieilloti
    Whistling Kite Haliastur sphenurus

    MAMMALS:
    Flying Fox Pteropus sp.
     
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  11. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    END - the one where it ends

    My flight home was with Jetstar, at 6.15am. This was why I chose the Coolongatta YHA to stay my final night! The Gold Coast Airport doesn't open until 4.30am, which tied in well with the checking-in time. I actually got to the terminal at 4.20am and everything was already open and full of people so ... I guess the airport website is wrong?

    No birds were seen today, although I heard Noisy Miners and Noisy Friarbirds calling in the dark as I walked to the terminal. Both of them are Noisy.

    I found out something interesting about airport body-scanners today. They only show a stylised body shape on the monitor (i.e. they aren't showing an actual image of the person going through the scanner) and "anomalies" show as yellow blocks on the body-shape. The machine has one button for male and one for female, so that the machine can ignore features which are common to one sex (e.g. beards in men). In my case I got an anomaly alert for my entire back because the machine didn't recognise my hair (in a plait) as a male feature.

    From the in-flight magazine I learned a couple of other interesting things. I take no responsibility if these are not true.

    One: the shortest scheduled passenger flight is ninety seconds long, in the Orkney Islands.

    Two: Roald Dahl wrote the screenplay for the 1967 James Bond movie You Only Live Twice.

    I also read this nice quote by Gustave Flaubert: "Travel makes one modest, you see what a tiny place you occupy in the world".


    Normally in my trip threads I will wrap everything up in a neat little package, with how much money I spent and average spends per day and per country, etc etc. However on this trip I was just bouncing about between countries, a few days here and a few days there, so the averages will be pretty meaningless. Instead I will simply give - in the next post - a full list of all the birds and other animals I saw, and then that will be the end.
     
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  12. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    not travelling
    SPECIES LISTS!

    These are the full lists for all the animals I saw (not including fish and invertebrates because I don't keep tallies of those). Lifers are in bold - there were nine new mammals (out of 41 species seen) and ten new birds (out of 284 species seen). They are listed in the order I saw them, by country. I have duplicated the species between the countries (e.g. Common Mynah is listed under all the countries), but each species is only numbered once. The numbers are the totals for this trip - they do not correspond to my year-list (because a lot of the Australian birds I had already seen in New Zealand before the trip).


    BIRDS

    SYDNEY
    1) Feral Pigeon Columba livia
    2) Silver Gull Larus novaehollandiae
    3) Australian White Ibis Threskiornis molucca
    4) Noisy Miner Manorina melanocephala
    5) Rainbow Lorikeet Trichoglossus haematodus
    6) Australian Magpie Gymorhina tibicen
    7) Common Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae
    8) Common Coot Fulica atra
    9) Dusky Moorhen Gallinula tenebrosa
    10) Pacific Black Duck Anas superciliosa
    11) Purple Swamphen Porphrio porphyrio
    12) Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    13) Galah Cacatua roseicapilla
    14) Greater Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita
    15) Little Wattlebird Anthochaera chrysoptera
    16) Welcome Swallow Hirundo neoxena
    17) Spur-winged (Masked) Plover Vanellus miles
    18) Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    19) Brown Falcon Falco berigora
    20) Spangled Drongo Dicrurus bracteatus
    21) Superb Blue Wren Malurus cyaneus
    22) Grey Fantail Rhipidura albiscapa
    23) Rufous Whistler Pachycephala rufiventris
    24) Willy Wagtail Rhipidura leucophrys
    25) Eastern Yellow Robin Eopsaltria australis
    26) Royal Spoonbill Platalea regia
    27) Australian Little Grebe Tachybaptus novaehollandiae
    28) Little Black Shag Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
    29) White-cheeked Honeyeater Phylidonyris nigra
    30) Red Wattlebird Anthochaera carunculata
    31) Bell Miner Manorina melanophrys
    32) Little Pied Shag Phalacrocorax melanoleucos
    33) Lewin's Honeyeater Meliphaga lewinii
    34) Red-whiskered Bulbul Pycnonotus jocosus
    35) Australian Brush Turkey Alectura lathami
    36) Eastern Spinebill Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris
    37) White-browed Scrubwren Sericornis frontalis
    38) Brown Gerygone Gerygone mouki
    39) Australian King Parrot Alisterus scapularis
    40) Eastern Whipbird Psophodes olivaceus
    41) Australian Wood Duck Chenonetta jubata
    42) Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes
    43) Pied Currawong Strepera graculina
    44) Australian Darter Anhinga novaehollandiae
    45) Black Swan Cygnus atratus
    46) Grey Teal Anas gracilis
    47) Australian Raven Corvus coronoides
    48) Australian Pelican Pelecanus conspicillatus
    49) White-eyed Duck Aythya australis
    50) Magpie-Lark Grallina cyanoleuca

    SINGAPORE
    51) Grey Heron Ardea cinerea
    52) Striated Heron Butorides striatus
    53) Germain's Swiftlet Collocalia germani
    54) Monk (Quaker) Parakeet Myiopsitta monachus
    55) Feral Chicken ["Red Junglefowl"] Gallus gallus (this is only numbered here because it is a list of birds seen - I don't count feral chickens on my year-lists etc)
    56) Pink-necked Green Pigeon Treron vernans
    57) Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
    58) Oriental Magpie-Robin Copsychus saularis
    59) Asian Koel Eudynamys scolopacea
    60) Oriental White-eye Zosterops palpebrosa
    61) Sunda Pigmy Woodpecker Dendrocopos moluccensis
    62) White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus
    Red-whiskered Bulbul Pycnonotus jocosus
    63) Olive-backed Sunbird Nectarinia jugularis
    64) Yellow-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus goiavier
    65) Black-naped Oriole Oriolus chinensis
    66) Javan Mynah Acridotheres javanicus
    Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    67) House Crow Corvus splendens
    Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    68) Brahminy Kite Haliastur indus
    69) Lesser Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Cacatua sulphurea
    70) Moustached Parakeet Psittacula alexandri
    71) Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
    72) Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica
    73) Dollarbird Eurystomus orientalis
    74) Indian Ringneck Parakeet Psittacula krameri
    75) Little Egret Egretta garzetta
    76) Stork-billed Kingfisher Halcyon capensis
    Feral Pigeon Columba livia
    77) Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
    78) Zebra Dove Geopelia striata
    79) Greater Racquet-tailed Drongo Dicrurus paradiseus
    80) Painted Stork Mycteria leucocephala
    81) Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis
    82) Lesser Whistling Duck Dendrocygna javanica
    83) Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax

    MALAYSIA
    84) White-bellied Sea Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster
    Black-naped Oriole Oriolus chinensis
    Javan Mynah Acridotheres javanicus
    Feral Pigeon Columba livia
    House Crow Corvus splendens
    Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
    Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    Germain's Swiftlet Collocalia germani
    85) Asian Glossy Starling Aplonis panayensis
    86) Greater Green Leafbird Chloropsis sonnerati
    87) Orange-bellied Flowerpecker Dicaeum trigonostigma
    88) Cream-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus simplex
    89) Hairy-backed Bulbul Tricholestes criniger
    90) Greater Hill Mynah Gracula religiosa
    91) Orange-backed Woodpecker Reinwardtipicus validus
    92) Purple-naped Sunbird Hypogramma hypogrammicum
    93) Blue-winged Leafbird Chloropsis moluccensis
    94) Striped Tit-Babbler Macronous gularis
    95) Chestnut-breasted Malkoha Phoenicophaeus curvirostris
    96) Asian Brown Flycatcher Muscicapa dauurica
    97) Red-eyed Bulbul Pycnonotus brunneus
    98) Tiger Shrike Lanius tigrinus
    99) Buff-vented Bulbul Iole olivacea
    100) Raffles' Malkoha Phoenicophaeus chlorophaeus
    101) Common Tailorbird Orthotomus sutorius
    102) Asian Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone paradisi
    Pacific Swallow Hirundo tahitica
    103) Asian House Swift Apus nipalensis
    104) White-rumped Shama Copsychus malabaricus
    105) Olive-winged Bulbul Pycnonotus plumosus
    106) Forest Wagtail Dendronanthus indicus
    107) Little Spiderhunter Arachnothera longirostra
    108) Grey-chested Jungle Flycatcher Rhinomyias umbratilis
    109) Yellow-bellied Bulbul Alophoixus phaeocephalus
    110) Checquer-throated Woodpecker Picus mentalis
    111) Spectacled Bulbul Pycnonotus erythrophthalmus
    Painted Stork Mycteria leucocephala
    112) White-vented Mynah Acridotheres grandis
    Little Egret Egretta garzetta
    113) White-throated Kingfisher Halcyon smyrnensis
    Yellow-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus goiavier
    114) Lineated Barbet Megalaima lineata
    115) Long-tailed Parakeet Psittacula longicauda
    Pink-necked Green Pigeon Treron vernans
    Dollarbird Eurystomus orientalis
    Zebra Dove Geopelia striata
    116) Nutmeg Finch (Scaly-breasted Munia) Lonchura punctulata
    117) Intermediate Egret Egretta intermedia
    118) Purple Heron Ardea purpurea
    119) Black-thighed Falconet Microhierax fringillarius
    Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax
    Oriental Magpie-Robin Copsychus saularis
    Striated Heron Butorides striatus
    120) Scarlet Minivet Pericrocotus flammeus
    121) White-bellied Yuhina Erpornis zantholeuca
    122) Brown Shrike Lanius cristatus
    123) Dark-necked Tailorbird Orthotomus atrogularis
    124) Red-billed Malkoha Phoenicophaeus javanicus
    125) Asian Fairy Bluebird Irena puella
    126) Plain Flowerpecker Dicaeum concolor
    127) Mountain Fulvetta Alcippe peracensis
    128) Grey-headed Canary-Flycatcher Culicicapa ceylonensis
    129) White-throated Fantail Rhipidura albicollis
    130) Streaked Spiderhunter Arachnothera magna
    131) Glossy (White-bellied) Swiftlet Collocalia esculenta
    132) Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
    133) Black-crested Bulbul Pycnonotus flaviventris
    134) Everett's White-eye Zosterops everetti
    135) Eastern Crowned Warbler Phylloscopus coronatus
    136) Mountain Tailorbird Phyllergates cucullatus
    137) Golden Babbler Stachyridopsis chrysaea
    138) Orange-breasted Trogon Harpactes oreskios
    139) Black and Yellow Broadbill Eurylaimus ochromalus
    140) Yellow-rumped Flycatcher Ficedula zanthopygia
    141) Dark-sided Flycatcher Muscicapa sibirica
    142) Grey Wagtail Motacilla cinerea
    143) Slaty-backed Forktail Enicurus schistaceus
    144) Long-tailed Sibia Heterophasia picaoides
    145) Black and Crimson Oriole Oriolus cruentus
    146) Black-browed Barbet Megalaima oorti
    147) Chestnut-capped Laughing Thrush Garrulax mitratus
    148) Black-bellied Malkoha Phaenicophaeus diardi
    149) Fire-tufted Barbet Psilopogon pyrolophus
    150) Grey-chinned Minivet Pericrocotus solaris
    151) Black-throated Sunbird Aethopyga saturata
    152) Rufous-browed Flycatcher Ficedula solitaris
    153) Lesser Racquet-tailed Drongo Dicrurus remifer
    154) Red-headed Trogon Harpactes erythrocephalus
    155) Grey-throated Babbler Stachyris nigriceps
    156) Slender-billed Crow Corvus enca
    157) Sultan Tit Melanochlora sultanea
    158) Mountain Bulbul Hypsipetes macclellandii
    159) Oriental Honey Buzzard Pernis ptilorhynchus
    160) Rufescent Prinia Prinia rufescens
    161) Little Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia ruficeps
    162) Little Pied Flycatcher Ficedula westermanni
    163) Greater Yellownape Woodpecker Picus flavinucha
    164) Silver-eared Mesia Leiothrix argentauris
    165) Chestnut-crowned Warbler Seicercus castaniceps
    166) Blue-winged Minla Siva cyanouroptera
    167) Large Niltava Niltava grandis
    168) Blue Nuthatch Sitta azurea
    169) Ochraceous Bulbul Alophoixus ochraceus
    170) Blue-tailed Bee-eater Merops philippinus
    171) Mountain Imperial Pigeon Ducula badia
    172) Purple-backed (Daurian) Starling Agropsar (Sturnus) sturninus

    THAILAND
    Asian House Swift Apus nipalensis
    Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
    Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    White-vented Mynah Acridotheres grandis
    Red-whiskered Bulbul Pycnonotus jocosus
    Nutmeg Finch (Scaly-breasted Munia) Lonchura punctulata
    173) Sooty-headed Bulbul Pycnonotus aurigaster
    Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
    174) Ashy Woodswallow Artamus fuscus
    175) House Sparrow Passer domesticus
    Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis
    Feral Pigeon Columba livia
    Painted Stork Mycteria leucocephala
    Zebra Dove Geopelia striata
    176) Chinese Pond Heron Ardeola bacchus
    177) Black Drongo Dicrurus macrocercus
    178) Crested Tree-Swift Hemiprocne coronata
    179) Asian Openbill Stork Anastomus oscitans
    180) Asian Pied Fantail Rhipidura javanica
    181) Streak-eared Bulbul Pycnonotus blanfordi
    182) Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker Dicaeum cruentatum
    183) Green-billed Malkoha Phaenicophaeus tristis
    Little Egret Egretta garzetta
    184) Himalayan Swiftlet Collocalia brevirostris

    LAOS
    House Sparrow Passer domesticus
    Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis
    Brown Shrike Lanius cristatus
    Common Tailorbird Orthotomus sutorius
    Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    Zebra Dove Geopelia striata
    Feral Pigeon Columba livia
    White-vented Mynah Acridotheres grandis
    Grey Wagtail Motacilla cinerea
    185) Blue Rock Thrush Monticola solitarius
    Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    Streaked Spiderhunter Arachnothera magna
    186) Collared Owlet Glaucidium brodei
    187) Puff-throated Bulbul Alophoixus pallidus
    188) Ashy Drongo Dicrurus leucophaeus
    Black Drongo Dicrurus macrocercus

    THAILAND again
    White-vented Mynah Acridotheres grandis
    Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    Zebra Dove Geopelia striata
    House Sparrow Passer domesticus
    Himalayan Swiftlet Collocalia brevirostris
    Brown Shrike Lanius cristatus
    Feral Pigeon Columba livia
    Asian Openbill Stork Anastomus oscitans
    Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis
    Little Egret Egretta garzetta
    Black Drongo Dicrurus macrocercus
    Intermediate Egret Egretta intermedia
    189) Great Egret Egretta alba
    190) Indian Cormorant Phalacrocorax fuscicollis
    191) Asian Little Cormorant Phalacrocorax niger
    192) Crow-billed Drongo Dicrurus annectens
    Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    Tree Sparrow Passer montanus
    193) Red-wattled Lapwing Vanellus indicus
    194) Coppersmith Barbet Megalaima haemacephala
    195) Large-billed Crow Corvus macrorhynchos
    Black-naped Oriole Oriolus chinensis
    Oriental Magpie-Robin Copsychus saularis
    Asian Koel Eudynamis scolopacea
    196) Asian Pied Starling Sturnus contra
    Asian Pied Fantail Rhipidura javanica
    Eastern Crowned Warbler Phylloscopus coronatus
    Streak-eared Bulbul Pycnonotus blanfordi
    197)Black-collared Starling Sturnus nigricollis
    198) Taiga Flycatcher Ficedula albicilla
    Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker Dicaeum cruentatum
    Scaly-breasted Munia (Nutmeg Finch) Lonchura punctulata
    199) Indian Roller Coracias benghalensis
    200) Black-winged Cuckoo-Shrike Coracina melaschistos
    Yellow-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus goiavier
    201) Javan Pond Heron Ardeola speciosa
    202) Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus
    Brown Shrike Lanius cristatus
    Collared Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris
    203) Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa
    204) White-winged Tern Chlidonias leucopterus
    205) Brown-headed Gull Larus brunnicephalus
    206) Whiskered Tern Chlidonias hybridus
    207) Common Redshank Tringa totanus
    208) Common Greenshank Tringa nebularia
    209) Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata
    Asian Brown Flycatcher Muscicapa dauurica
    210) Black-capped Kingfisher Halcyon pileata
    Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
    211) Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva
    212) Greater Coucal Centropus sinensis
    213) Hill Blue Flycatcher Cyornis banyumas
    214) Golden-bellied Gerygone Gerygone sulphurea
    215) Black-naped Monarch Hypothymis azurea
    Common Tailorbird Orthotomus sutorius
    Striated Heron Butorides stiatus
    Green-billed Malkoha Phaenicophaeus tristis
    White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus
    Greater Racquet-tailed Drongo Dicrurus paradiseus
    Ashy Drongo Dicrurus leucophaeus
    Pink-necked Green Pigeon Treron vernans
    Olive-backed Sunbird Nectarinia jugularis
    216) Hainan Blue Flycatcher Cyornis hainanus
    217) Large Cuckoo-Shrike Coracina macei
    Grey-headed Canary-Flycatcher Culicicapa ceylonensis
    Dark-necked Tailorbird Orthotomus atrogularis
    Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica
    218) Plain Prinia Prinia inornata
    219) Black-winged Kite Elanus caeruleus
    220) Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis
    221) Yellow Bittern Ixobrychus sinensis
    222) Marsh Sandpiper Tringa stagnatilis
    223) Yellow Wagtail Motacilla thunbergi (or the Eastern M. tschutschensis if split)
    224) Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
    Blue-tailed Bee-eater Merops philippinus
    225) Stejneger's Stonechat Saxicola stejnegeri
    226) Richard's Pipit Anthus richardi
    227) Temminck's Stint Calidris temminckii

    BRISBANE
    228) Australian Figbird Sphecotheres vieilloti
    Welcome Swallow Hirundo neoxena
    Noisy Miner Manorina melanocephala
    Australian Magpie Gymnorhina tibicen
    Australian White Ibis Threskiornis molucca
    Masked Lapwing Vanellus miles
    229) Torresian Crow Corvus orru
    Rainbow Lorikeet Trichoglossus haematodus
    Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis
    Magpie-Lark Grallina cyanoleuca
    Feral Pigeon Columba livia
    230) Grey Butcherbird Craciticus torquatus
    231) Common Starling Sturnus vulgaris
    232) Straw-necked Ibis Threskiornis spinicollis
    233) Banded Rail Gallirallus philippensis
    Common Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae
    Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes
    234) Pied Butcherbird Cracticus nigrogularis
    Willy Wagtail Rhipidura leucophrys
    235) Brown Honeyeater Lichmera indistincta
    236) Grey Shrike-Thrush Colluricincla harmonica
    237) Rainbow Bee-eater Merops ornatus
    Little Pied Shag Phalacrocorax melanoleucos
    238) Blue-faced Honeyeater Entomyzon cyanotis
    239) White-headed (Pied) Stilt Himantopus leucocephalus
    Dusky Moorhen Gallinula tenebrosa
    Grey Teal Anas gracilis
    Purple Swamphen Porphyrio porphyrio
    Intermediate Egret Egretta intermedia
    Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis
    White-eyed Duck Aythya australis
    Whiskered Tern Chlidonias hybridus
    Greater Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita
    240) Red-backed Fairy-Wren Malurus melanocephalus
    241) Pale-headed Rosella Platycercus adscitus
    242) Long-billed Corella Cacatua tenuirostris
    243) Magpie Goose Anseranas semipalmata
    244) Black-faced Cuckoo-Shrike Coracina novaehollandiae
    Spangled Drongo Dicrurus bracteatus
    Pied Currawong Strepera graculina
    245) Bush Stone-Curlew Burhinus grallarius
    Common Coot Fulica atra
    Little Black Shag Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
    Pacific Black Duck Anas superciliosa
    Australian Wood Duck Chenonetta jubata
    Australian Brush Turkey Alectura lathami
    Common Mynah Acridotheres tristis
    246) Scarlet Honeyeater Myzomela sanguinolenta
    247) Little Friarbird Philemon citreogularis
    Galah Cacatua roseicapilla
    248) Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus
    249) White-faced Heron Ardea novaehollandiae
    250) Noisy Friarbird Philemon corniculatus
    251) Wedge-tailed Shearwater Puffinus puffinus
    Silver Gull Larus novaehollandiae
    252) Great Crested Tern Sterna bergii
    253) Little Corella Cacatua sanguinea
    254) White-breasted Woodswallow Artamus leucorynchus
    Australian Pelican Pelecanus conspicillatus
    Brahminy Kite Haliastur indus
    255) Osprey Pandion haliaetus
    256) Leaden Flycatcher Myiagra rubecula
    Eastern Yellow Robin Eopsaltria australis
    257) Bar-shouldered Dove Geopelia humeralis
    Rufous Whistler Pachycephala rufiventris
    Australian Raven Corvus coronoides
    258) Australian Black-shouldered Kite Elanus axillaris
    259) Black Kite Milvus migrans
    260) Tawny Grassbird Cincloramphus timoriensis
    Superb Blue Wren Malurus cyaneus
    261) Pallid Cuckoo Cacomantis pallidus
    Lewin's Honeyeater Meliphaga lewinii
    262) Glossy Ibis Plegadis falcinellus
    Brown Falcon Falco berigora
    263) Black-fronted Dotterel Elseyornis melanops
    264) Fairy Martin Hirundo ariel
    265) Double-barred (Owl) Finch Taeniopygia bichenovii
    266) Brown Quail Coturnix ypsilophora
    267) Red-browed Firetail Neochmia temporalis
    268) Tawny Frogmouth Podargus strigoides
    269) Fan-tailed Cuckoo Cacomantis flabelliformis
    270) Olive-backed Oriole Oriolus sagittatus
    271) Golden-headed Cisticola Cisticola exilis
    272) Latham's Snipe Gallinago hardwickii
    Australian Darter Anhinga novaehollandiae
    273) Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo
    Eastern Whipbird Psophodes olivaceus
    274) White-winged Triller Lalage tricolor
    275) Golden Whistler Pachycephala pectoralis
    276) Australasian Pipit Anthus novaeseelandiae
    Australian King Parrot Alisterus scapularis
    277) Comb-crested Jacana Jacana gallinacea
    278) Brown Thornbill Acanthiza pusilla
    White-browed Scrubwren Sericornis frontalis
    279) Large-billed Scrubwren Sericornis magnirostris
    Bell Miner Manorina melanophrys
    280) White-throated Treecreeper Cormobates leucophaeus
    Dollarbird Eurystomus orientalis
    281) Australian Koel Eudynamys orientalis
    282) Shining Cuckoo Chrysococcyx lucidus
    283) Cicadabird Coracina [Edolisoma] tenuirostris
    284) Whistling Kite Haliastur sphenurus

    .......................................................................

    MAMMALS

    SYDNEY
    1) Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus
    2) Sugar Glider Petaurus breviceps
    3) Swamp Wallaby Wallabia bicolor
    4) Common Brush-tailed Possum Trichosurus vulpecula
    5) Brown Antechinus Antechinus stuartii

    SINGAPORE
    6) Smooth-coated Otter Lutrogale perspicillata
    7) Plantain squirrel Callosciurus notatus
    8) Wild Pig Sus scrofa (vittatus)
    9) Colugo Cynocephalus variegatus
    10) Common Tree Shrew Tupaia glis
    11) Slender Squirrel Sundasciurus tenuis
    12) Sunda Pangolin Manis javanica

    MALAYSIA
    13) Crab-eating Macaque Macaca fascicularis
    Slender Squirrel Sundasciurus tenuis
    14) Banded Leaf Monkey Presbytis femoralis
    15) White-handed (Lar) Gibbon Hylobates lar
    Common Tree Shrew Tupaia glis
    16) Cream-coloured Giant Squirrel Ratufa affinis
    Plantain Squirrel Callosciurus notatus
    17) Dusky Langur Trachypithecus obscurus
    18) Malaysian Upland Squirrel Sundasciurus tahan
    19) Agile Gibbon Hylobates agilis
    20) Grey-bellied Squirrel Callosciurus caniceps
    21) Himalayan Striped Squirrel Tamiops macclellandi
    22) Red-bellied (Pallas') Squirrel Callosciurus erythraeus
    23) White-thighed Langur Presbytis siamensis
    24) Spotted Giant Flying Squirrel Petaurista elegans
    25) Leopard Cat Prionailurus bengalensis
    26) Brown Rat Rattus norvegicus

    THAILAND
    27) Assamese Macaque Macaca assamensis

    Himalayan Striped Squirrel Tamiops macclellandii
    28) Indochinese Grey Langur Trachypithecus crepusculus
    29) Variable Squirrel Callosciurus finlaysonii
    30) Northern Tree Shrew Tupaia belangeri
    31) Greater Short-nosed Fruit Bat Cynopterus sphinx
    32) Berdmore's (Indochinese) Ground Squirrel Menetes berdmorei
    33) Lyle's Flying Fox Pteropus lylei
    Brown Rat Rattus norvegicus
    Red-bellied (Pallas') Squirrel Callosciurus erythraeus

    BRISBANE
    34) Black Flying Fox Pteropus alecto
    35) Little Red Flying Fox Pteropus scapulatus
    Common Brushtail Possum Trichosurus vulpecula
    Grey-headed Flying Fox Pteropus poliocephalus
    36) Eastern Grey Kangaroo Macropus giganteus
    37) Koala Phascolarctos cinereus
    38) Australian Humpback Dolphin Sousa sahulensis
    39) Red-necked Wallaby Macropus rufogriseus
    40) Squirrel Glider Petaurus norfolcensis
    Sugar Glider Petaurus breviceps
    41) Common Ringtail Possum Pseudocheirus peregrinus

    .......................................................................

    REPTILES

    SYDNEY
    1) Eastern Water Dragon Physignathus lesueurii

    SINGAPORE
    2) Asian Water Monitor Varanus salvator
    3) Red-eared Terrapin Trachemys scripta elegans
    4) Garden Lizard Calotes versicolor

    MALAYSIA
    Asian Water Monitor Varanus salvator
    5) Green Crested Lizard Bronchocela cristatella
    6 and 7) Two reed snakes which I still haven't got round to IDing yet...

    THAILAND
    Asian Water Monitor Varanus salvator
    Red-eared Terrapin Trachemys scripta elegans

    BRISBANE
    Eastern Water Dragon Physignathus lesueurii
    8) Brisbane River Turtle Emydura krefftii signata
    9) Carpet Python Morelia spilota

    .......................................................................

    AMPHIBIANS

    SINGAPORE
    1) Black-spined Toad Bufo melanostictus

    BRISBANE
    2) Cane Toad Rhinella marinus
     
    birdsandbats, Brum and Vision like this.
  13. DavidBrown

    DavidBrown Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2008
    Posts:
    4,501
    Location:
    California, USA
    Thanks for taking us with you on another interesting rollick through Asia.

    In this journey I learned what a powerful owl is and that as a ratophobe, I never want to go near alleys behind restaurants at night.
     
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  14. WhistlingKite24

    WhistlingKite24 Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    What a fantastic bird to finish the trip! :D
    Really enjoyed reading about your travels.
     
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  15. FunkyGibbon

    FunkyGibbon Well-Known Member

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    True, although I haven't flown it.
     
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  16. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Sounds like you wouldn't even need the plane. Could probably just jump across.
     
  17. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Just take a Powerful Owl with you. You'll be fine.
     
  18. Najade

    Najade Well-Known Member

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    There’s a new report on mammalwatching about where to see ‘em. Link
     
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  19. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    That's great - I wish this had been available a few months ago! Maybe a return trip...
     
  20. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Looking at a map, the Kong Lor caves are only about 40km from where I was in Ban Na Hin!

    I think the viewing point he mentions for Laos Langur (where he says a zip-line has now been installed) is the one I passed on the bus where they were building a new platform.

    Le sigh