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cloudedleopard's Exhibit Design Thread

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by cloudedleopard, 27 Jul 2014.

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  1. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    Exhibit Designing Competition

    This is a classic "exhibit design" thread. Whoever wins the challenge sets the next one, and so on.
    I set the first one.
    Exhibit MUST HAVE 1 red animal, 1 blue animal, and so on.
    Colors- red, blue, green, yellow, orange, purple, brown, black, gray, white
    Must have- 1 aviary, 3 vivaria, 1 invertebrate, 1 mammal
    Must have special attraction (animal ride, feeding, carousel, etc.)
     
  2. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    Fantasy Zoo

    The Lorain County Zoo-
    Address- North Ridgeville/Avon, Ohio 44039/44011
    Admission- adults 13-60 $10, seniors 61+ $8, children 3-12 $6, infants 0-2 free, parking free, train $2, pony rides $3
    Exhibits-
    The two main areas of Lorain County Zoo are Diverse City, Diverse Zoo and Expedition Africa- Savanna Trek-
    Expedition Africa- Savanna Trek (EAST). EAST begins at an entry plaza just west of the zoo entrance, with a restaurant and gift shop. There is a safari train that allows for views of all of the animals in EAST. Magicians of the Mountains- the Mountain Gorillas of Virunga is the first exhibit, with 2.3 mountain gorilla. After Magicians of the Mountains (MOTM) is the Pachyderm Plaza, with a building for indoor views of the pachyderms- 2.2 African elephant, 1.0 Nile hippo, and 1.2 black rhino. There are paddocks for all three and a river exhibit for the hippos. The path and the train tracks continue past more hippo viewing and two fenced areas of the same river, for 2.2 Cape buffalo and 1.0 Niile crocodile. The river continues into an aviary for African gray parrots, crowned cranes and other birds of East Africa. The train tracks go past the aviary and so does the footpath. The next exhibit is the Predator Pride for 2.2 African lion, 1.2 cheetah, 2.2 spotted hyenas, 1.1 African wild dog, and 0.1 leopard. 5.5 Masai giraffes, 2.2 Grant's zebras and assorted ostriches share a large paddock toward the end of EAST. The paddock also has various antelope, including, but not limited to, impala, kudu, gemsbok, gerenuk, and bontebok. The paddock is similar to the paddock at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, the closest zoo to the proposed Lorain County Zoo. The last part is the Herpetarium and Insectarium, with various vivaria for reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates of East Africa.
    Diverse County, Diverse Zoo (DCDZ)- DCDZ is north of the zoo's entrance, opposed to west of the zoo's entrance (where EAST is). DCDZ appeals to parents teaching them to respect their culture/nationality through animals. It caters to the Mexicans and Puerto Ricans that make up a large percentage of Lorain County. The signs for all animals are in English and Spanish, similar to the signs at Santa Ana Zoo, but not incomplete Spanish like the signs at Santa Ana. Racism is not the goal of this exhibit, the goal is curiosity and respect. The curiosity part comes from children wanting to learn more about their culture/nationality. They do so by learning about animals from the country/countries where their parents are from.
    Puerto Rico- A Puerto Rican flag begins the Puerto Rico's Animals (Los Animales de Puerto Rico) exhibit. The exhibit continues into a building with the coqui frog and a button children can press to hear the sound of this frog (similar to Santa Ana and Cleveland Zoos) and then a Puerto Rican crested toad exhibit, similar to the former exhibit of these two species at the Cleveland RainForest, but at Lorain County the exhibits would be separate from each other. The exhibit continues back outdoors through an aviary with Amazon parrots, smooth-billed anis, and bananaquits, as well as a small outdoor cave tunnel for bats and invertebrates, similar to the insect cave at San Diego's Elephant Odyssey. A Mexican flag begins the Los Animales de México (Animals of Mexico) exhibit. The highlight of this part of DCDZ is the Mexican wolf enclosure, similar to Cleveland's. A jaguar exhibit is next, similar to Akron Zoo's jaguar exhibit. Jaguar lovers who live west of Cleveland (in Parma/Bay Village/Strongsville/North Olmsted, etc.) or in Lorain County will appreciate this exhibit because they will not have to drive to Akron. A small building is next, with reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates of Mexico, including the Durango mud turtle. The Durango chipmunk is also kept indoors, in a exhibit similar to the Cleveland RainForest's bat exhibit, but shorter and not as tall. After the Mexico exhibit, there is one more part of the zoo, northeast of DCDZ.
    Lorain County Farmyard- This exhibit is the classic, common contact yard for goats and sheep. There are also exhibits for turkeys and chickens, as well as pigs and ponies (pony rides are available). There are also rabbit hutches similar to the type at the children's zoo at OC (Orange County) Zoo in Orange, CA, but the hutches at Lorain County are larger and with more hay and enrichment.
     
  3. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    These are some good exhibits but could use a little more description for those of us who haven't been to the zoos you reference. With some of these species I would only keep one male like the zebras, elephants, lions, gorillas, and cape buffalo and allow them to have harems. Also, why only one hippo?

    I like the Mexico and Puerto Rico themed area. Very good idea to have the wildlife found in the homelands of the majority of the immigrants' homelands.
     
  4. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    Changes and Error Repairs to LC Zoo

    1.0 hippo is an error. It was meant to be 1.1.
    Exhibit changes-
    1.5 Grant's zebra
    1.4 African elephant
    1.4 Cape buffalo
    1.3 mountain gorilla
    1.3 African lion
     
  5. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    Mega Zoo Design

    The Mega Zoo would be divided into 4 zones- Forests and Swamps, Tundra and Oceans, Deserts and Grasslands, and Mountains and Farmlands.
    Location- Flagstaff, AZ
    Admission-
    Each zone- adults 13-59 $9, seniors 60+ $8, children 3-12 $6, infants 0-2 free
    All four zones- adults $30, seniors $28, children $25
    A visitor to Mega Zoo would save money by buying tickets for all four zones. For example, if two adults, a senior, and two children went to the zoo, the price would be $38/zone, or $152 for all four zones. If the same family would buy tickets for the whole zoo, the price would be $138, or $34.50/zone.
    Other amenities- train $2, carousel $1, lorikeet feeding $1, camel rides $3, seal feeding $1, Stingray Adventure $2
    Wait for more posted in a day or two!
     
  6. Mikezoo12

    Mikezoo12 Well-Known Member

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    OVERPRICED!!!!!!
     
  7. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    The prices on the mega zoo will be changed.
    Adults $4, seniors $3, children $2, infants free
    Admission for all 4 zones- adults $14, seniors $12, children $10
     
  8. Mikezoo12

    Mikezoo12 Well-Known Member

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    much better
     
  9. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    UNDERPRICED!!!!!!
     
  10. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    Aside from the prices, what animals are in the Mega Zoo?
     
  11. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    Zone #1- Forests and Swamps

    The Forests and Swamps (FS) would be located north of the entrance. The first part would be the Rainforest Adventure- Voyage through Three Amazing Continents. It would be a walk-through exhibit with low glass barriers being used for the most part. The first part would be South America, with a map showing an imaginary trek through the Amazon. Macaws (hyacinth, blue and gold, and scarlet) would be seen from trees, as well as various Amazon parrots, toco toucans, and green aracaris. Dart poison frogs would hop all over the simulated Amazon, as well as two-toed sloths and prehensile-tailed porcupines in the trees. South American tapirs would be free-ranging throughout the area, with a tunnel allowing them to cross. In a tree would be a boa constrictor. Jaguars and ocelots would be seen next, followed by a small cave with tanks of 20 reptile/amphibian/invertebrate species. Visitors would cross a bridge on a creek representing crossing the Atlantic Ocean into Africa. The Africa area would be similar to Columbus Zoo's Expedition Congo: African Forest. The zoo would be known for primates, because it would have all four species of great ape in large, naturalistic enclosures. Chimpanzees would have a large, densely forested enclosure, followed by a similar enclosure for bonobos. Both exhibits would have a moat so the animals could not escape. Western lowland gorillas and colobus monkeys would also have large enclosures. African forest elephants and forest buffalo would be seen on the Ituri Trail, which would continue past enclosures for okapi, red river hogs, and mandrills. The Duiker Jeep would be a free jeep ride that would take you past exhibits for seven species of duiker, including black duikers. The jeep would start at a station just outside the okapis and end at the end of the Africa area. The last area would be Asia. Greater one-horned rhinos and Sumatran rhinos would have large enclosures at the simulated Belangah National Park. Malayan tigers and Sumatran elephants would continue the Malay/Indonesian theme, followed by enclosurse for Bornean and Sumatran orangutans. Bornean pygmy elephants and saola would end the Asia exhibit. The fourth and smallest area would be New Guinea and Australia, with a shared exhibit for Matschie's tree kangaroos and short-beaked echidna, and a cassowary yard. After the Rainforest Adventure would be an area for temperate forest animals, called a Walk in the Woods- Into the Fascinating World of Animals of Temperate Forests. The first area would be North America, with a white-tailed deer exhibit. A large songbird aviary similar to the aviary at Columbus Zoo's North America would be next, with 20 species of bird from North America, such as bobwhite quails and northern cardinals. Cottontail rabbits and chipmunks would have large forested enclosures, followed by raccoons, opossums, and owls (barred and great horned) in nocturnal exhibits. Reptiles and amphibians would be displayed in a small cabin- the most common lizards, snakes, salamanders, newts, turtles, toads and frogs of the North American deciduous forest. A bridge crossing on a small river meant to represent the Atlantic would lead to Europe. There would be nocturnal exhibits for hammerhead bats, tawny owls, and Eurasian badgers, as well as exhibits for red squirrels and a large paddock for wisent (European bison). A fallow deer paddock as well as a fallow deer/wisent mixed exhibit would complete the Europe forest. Asia would have a montane forest exhibit for red pandas, as well as snow leopards (no, I don't mean Abbotsford). Amur leopards and Amur tigers would have two large enclosures representing the forests of Russia. The premier exhibit would be of giant pandas. A trail with bamboo plants would be the way to get to the large, bamboo-filled exhibit for giant pandas. The Swamps part would start with an exhibit representing Louisiana’s Atchafalaya Basin. American alligators would be visible from viewing windows in a tumbledown shack, followed by an exhibit for swamp fish- white and black crappie, channel catfish, bluegill, warmouth, largemouth bass, and redear sunfish. Swamp and eastern cottontail rabbits would share an enclosure. River otters and raccoons would also have large naturalistic swampy enclosures, as well as black bears and the invasive nutria. The Everglades Swamp would be a large exhibit of animals from the Everglades. There would be another exhibit for American alligator, as well as a building for small animals and fish of southwest Florida’s swamps. The amphibians would be Florida bog, gopher, and Pine Barrens tree frogs, as well as Georgia blind and flatwoods salamanders. Eastern indigo snakes and four species of sea turtles would live in the building. An ocean tank would have loggerhead and green sea turtles. Atlantic sturgeon and various small fish in the area would have tanks. Continuing into the exhibit would be an exhibit shared by little blue herons and snowy egrets. Red-cockadde woodpeckers and Everglade snail kites would also have habitats, followed by Florida panthers, Key deer, Lower Keys marsh rabbits, and rodents (Sanibel Island and silver rice rats as well as Key Largo woodrats and cotton mice). Florida black bears would be right before the premier exhibit- for West Indian manatees. The next part of the Swamps exhibit would be the Pantanal, representing a swamp in Brazil. Maned wolves, marsh deer, giant otters, and bush dogs would live in large, swampy, naturalistic enclosures. Signage would be EVERYWHERE, lining the path with information about animals living in the Pantanal found elsewhere in the zoo (such as the tapir, jaguar and anteater). A tree exhibit would have a southern tamandua in it. Crested caracaras would be before Reptile Walk. Reptile Walk would be a semi-walkthrough area. Green iguanas, gold tegus, and red-footed tortoises would be walking free in a special area similar to a walk-through aviary. An outdoor tall terrarium would have a yellow anaconda. After the reptile walk-through would be the penultimate part of the zone- the Okavango Delta, representing a swamp with the same name in Botswana. African fish eagles and Pel’s fishing owls would have aivaries, as well as sacred ibises and hammerkops in a large, naturalistic enclosure. African buffalo, hippos, brown hyenas, Chacma baboons, lechwe, and tsessebe would be displayed in large enclosures along a path. The path would leave only an area representing the Sudd, an area in South Sudan. African wild dogs and white-eared kob would have naturalistic predator/prey enclosures, separated by each other by only a moat. Black crowned cranes, shoebills and great white pelicans would be in a walk-through swamp aviary.
     
    Last edited: 1 Aug 2014
  12. ABQZoo Guy

    ABQZoo Guy Member

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    This is a cool concept! Nice species and beautiful exhibit!

    But it is way underpriced.

    And where are you going to get a Saola?

    And is this an all inclusive resort? Cause if not, I'm not sure Flagstaff is a great place to do this :/ Also Arizona has really restrictive importation laws especially for plants but for animals as well.

    I mean....I guess it IS a fantasy zoo thread.
     
  13. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    MEGA ZOO CHANGE-
    Price- adults $9, seniors $8, children $7
    For all 4 zones- adults $32, seniors $28, children $24 (cheaper than San Diego)
    CHANGE OF LOCATION- Lorain, Ohio
     
  14. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    Here is the second part- Deserts and Grasslands, based on Javan Rhino's stellar exhibit similar to this one. There are changes in species and the addition of South American Pampas, not covered by JR.
    Deserts and Grasslands would start off with Endangered Africa, showcasing animals that are at least endangered. The main paddock is 15 acres for Grevy's zebras, West African giraffes, and eastern black rhinos. There are smaller off-show paddocks, three each for the giraffes and zebras, and two for the rhinos. An elevated deck would lead to an exhibit for radiated tortoises. There would be a bin of vegetables that you could feed the tortoises for an extra $1. Tickets would be paid for at the main entrance and dropped into a box at the tortoise exhibit. The deck would go downhill after the tortoise enclosure and pass an exhibit for African wild dogs. A similar large paddock would be Mara Safari, but with less endangered animals. The animals would be white rhinos, ostriches, and antelope- Thomson's gazelles, gemsbok, gerenuk, blue wildebeest, and impala. After the grassland would be a river for Nile hippo and Cape buffalo. An aviary visible by netting would be after Mara Safari, with greater flamingos, hammerkops, lilac-breasted rollers, marabou storks, and African white-backed vulture. There would be an exhibit for cheetahs, naturally landscaped. Brown hyenas and lions would have similar grassy enclosures. Three rocky, netted enclosures would have Chacma, Hamadryas and gelada baboons. The baboons would rotate through the exhibits. Meerkats and warthogs would share an enclosure after the baboons, ending the Grasslands of East Africa area.
    Egypt- History and Mystery would be the next area. Visitors would enter through a high arch with hieroglyphs on it. The first exhibit would be for Nile crocodile, followed by a small aviary for Egyptian plovers. Egyptian geese and sacred ibis would have an aviary. Four large rotating paddocks are next, for African wild donkey (Equus africanus), dromedary camals, scimitar-horned oryx, and addax. After the paddocks is the entrance to the pyramid. The first floor would be dark with signage about insects in ancient Egyptian culture and exhibits for scorpions, centipedes, dung beetles, and scarab beetles. The first floor would be home to small animals- fennecs, sand cats, desert hedgehogs, Cairo spiny mice, and crested porcupines. Egyptian tortoises and cobras would have vivaria. African silverbills and Nile Valley sunbirds are free flying all over the first floor. The second floor has Egyptian fruit bats and the exit to the pyramid. The end of Egypt would be four aviaries for Egyptian vultures, lammergeyers, Lanner falcons, and Pharaoh eagle-owls.
    Outback Australia would be the next area. An arch wth Aboriginal art on it would mark the entrance to this area. Past the arch would be a grassy, sandy paddock for emus and red kangaroos. Further down on the path would be a larger paddock for brush turkeys, gray kangaroos, and malleefowl. The Australian Village would be past the two paddocks and have statues, gardens, a fountain, a children’s play area, a gift shop, and a café. The “Invading Army” exhibit would be located at the Australian Village, with cane toads and European rabbits, both invasive species in Australia. The Reptile Roundabout would be a circular building with various reptiles of Australia- bearded dragon, frilled lizard, taipan, thorny devil, blue-tongued skink, perentie, bandy-bandy, carpet python, and a rare lizard-like reptile from New Zealand called a tuatara. The exit would be right near the entrance because the building would be basically a circle.
    The Australian Mammal Complex would have Australian small mammals, with outdoor enclosures for common wombats, Tasmanian devils, short-beaked echidnas, greater bilbies, and brush-tailed bettongs. After the Mammal Complex would be outdoor enclosures for the Tasmanian devils, bilbies, and wombats and then the last part of Outback Australia, Wallaby Walkthrough. Visitors would be able to walk through a two-acre paddock for wallabies- tammar, red-necked, Parma, Bennett’s, wallaroos, and brush-tailed rock wallabies. Visitors who do not want to be so close to the wallabies can walk on a path outside of the paddock.
    The next part of the Deserts and Grasslands would be Asian Adventure- Steppes and Grasslands.
    The first enclosure after the entrance would be an 8-acre plain meant to replicate flooded grasslands in Nepal. Indian rhinos, blackbuck antelope and Rhesus macaques would live in this paddock (with a pool and mostly grassy, but with some dirt and sand). There would be isolation paddocks in the back for all three species. The next enclosure would represent Mongolia’s Gobi Desert and would be for Bactrian camels. A sandier enclosure next to the camels would represent the deserts of the Middle East and have Arabian oryx. Past those two paddocks would be a caracal enclosure and a similar enclosure for Pallas’ cat, with a small waterfall and a wall of rocks as well as a pool. The last exhibits would be for Eurasian wild horses and the horses would rotate. The east paddock would have Przewalski’s horses, the middle kiangs, and the west Persian onagers.
    The next part of Grasslands and Deserts would be Amazing America- Desert Realm. There would be a paddock for bison and prairie dogs and a replica Plains Native American village. After the bison/prairie dog paddock and the village would be two large aviaries- one for California condors and the other for turkey vultures. Red wolves would have a grassy/sandy enclosure, followed by the Death Valley FaunaDome. There would be a large, netted desert aviary for greater roadrunners, burrowing and elf owls, pyrrhuloxias, Gila woodpeckers, and loggerhead shrikes. There would also be a large enclosure for desert tortoises and terrariums for chuckwallas, Gila monsters, Mexican red-knee tarantulas, and western diamondback rattlesnakes.
    The last part of Grasslands and Deserts would be the smallest area of this zone, the South American Pampas. Giant anteaters and capybaras would share an enclosure also populated by Patagonian maras. Greater rheas would have a paddock, followed by maned wolves and guanacos in large, naturalistic pampas paddocks.
     
  15. Arizona Docent

    Arizona Docent Moderator Staff Member

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    Someone said $30 for the Flagstaff location is overpriced. There is a zoo (Out Of Africa) down the highway from Flagstaff (about an hour) that charges this much - $29.95 to be exact. They have literally a handful of animals - mostly lions and tigers plus one (yes one) hoofstock savanna. With the species list show here, this mega zoo would be a real bargain by comparison.
     
  16. Arizona Docent

    Arizona Docent Moderator Staff Member

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    Followup - I know this is fantasy zoos and I know you changed the location to Ohio, but as an Arizonan I would love to see a zoo in Flagstaff.
     
  17. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    A Fantasy Zoo, Part 1

    This is similar to another fantasy zoo I posted, but there are some differences.
    Lorain County Zoo at French Creek Park
    Address- Avon/Avon Lake, Ohio 44011/12
    Admission- $9 adults 13-59, $7 seniors 60+, $5 children 3-12, infants 0-2 free
    Extra- goat feeding 25c, carousel $2, jeep $2, farm train $2
    Exhibits- Savanna Safari, ¡Ay!, Crikey!- A Down Under Adventure, Lorain County Farmyard
     
    Last edited: 9 Aug 2014
  18. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    I look forward to seeing the finished product.
     
  19. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    Changes

    Instead of Mountains and Farmlands, the third zone will be Mountains and Islands. Farmlands will be a fifth zone.
     
  20. cloudedleopard

    cloudedleopard Well-Known Member

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    Mountains and Islands, Part 1-

    Here is part 1 of Mountains and Islands. The remaining islands are Japan, New Zealand, and the Galapagos. The mountains will be the Rockies, Pyrenees and Himalayas. Some species will be in other parts of the zoo as well.
    Some exhibits are modified off exhibits from other ZooChatters, but have been changed greatly.
    Islands and Mountains-
    Wild Caribbean!-
    Wild Caribbean! would be a building with automatic glass doors. The path to the building would be lined with banana trees, palm trees, and other native Caribbean trees. The first enclosure would be a large multi-species coral reef tank, for-
    Grunt sp.
    Smooth trunkfish
    Great barracuda
    Trumpetfish
    Sand Diver
    Butterflyfish sp.
    Angelfish sp.
    Squirrelfish sp.
    Porcupinefish
    Goliath grouper
    Spotted drum
    Blue tang
    Yellowhead jawfish
    Peacock flounder
    Scrawled cowfish
    Sharpnose pufferfish
    Yellowtail snapper
    White-spotted filefish
    There would also be a smaller tank for the invasive lionfish. Howler monkeys and Demarest's hutias would have two netted enclosures. Signage would be everywhere. After the monkeys and hutias, there would be a set of glass tanks for reptiles and amphibians, with signage about the worldwide amphibian crisis. The amphibians would be Puerto Rican crested toads, Trinidad stream frogs, and mountain chicken frogs. The reptiles would be two types of boa- Cuban and Jamaican- and the Lesser Antilles iguana. Haitian solenodons would have a large enclosure before a row of interpretive signage about the Caribbean and conservation. The walk-through enclosure (through another set of automatic glass doors) would have a path and a 2-acre netted enclosure. Amazon parrots, Monserrat orioles, Caribbean flamingos, scarlet ibis, roseate spoonbills, squirrel monkeys, and agoutis would roam freely in the netted enclosure, with a pond.
    Indomalay Adventure-
    Indomalay Adventure would be five islands in a middle of a small lake, connected by bridges. The first island would be Malaysian Peninsula. Malayan tapirs would have a large, naturalistic exhibit. Binturongs would have a nocturnal tree exhibit with tall trees for climbing and foliage everywhere. Greater and lesser Malayan chevrotains would share a large enclosure, but they would have separate off-show enclosures. Sumatra would have rare Sumatran rhinos, Sumatran orangutans, Sumatran tigers, and large netted aviaries for rhinoceros hornbiills, wreathed hornbills, common hoopoes, and great hornbills. The first part of Borneo would have a large rainforest enclosure Bornean orangutans, Bornean tarsiers, siamangs, and a Borneo aviary for blue-headed pittas and black-capped white-eyes. Bornean pygmy elephants, Bornean bearded pigs, Bornean clouded leopards, Bornean yellow muntjacs, Bornean sun bears, Bornean bantengs, Mueller’s gibbons, and the Bornean subspecies of the Sumatran rhino would all have large, naturalistic, densely wooded enclosures. The gibbons would have many ropes and trees for brachiating. The fifth island, Marketplace Island, would have a café (the Borneo Restaurant) and a gift shop (the Suraba Island Market).
    Sri Lankan Trail would start with a 5-acre paddock for Sri Lankan sambar and Sri Lankan axis deer, followed by a large naturalistic enclosure for Sri Lankan sloth bears. Purple-faced langurs and Toque macaques would be right next to each other in outdoor glass-fronted enclosures. Sri Lankan leopards would have a large enclosure with signage about the subspecies and the fact that leopards are endangered. A nocturnal exhibit for red slender lorises would be before the highlight, a 3-acre paddock for Sri Lankan elephants, with an off-show paddock and an indoor barn.
    Taiwanese Trail would start with a sign saying “Welcome to Taiwan” in English and Chinese. Rows of signage would give way to the Formosan serow/Formosan sambar/Formosan sika deer paddock. It would be a 5-acre paddock with several viewing points for these hoofed mammals. Formosan wild boars would be next, followed by Chinese pangolins and crab-eating mongooses. Formosan Reeves’ muntjacs would have plenty of room in a very large enclosure for such a small deer. Formosan black bears and a Taiwan Aviary with Formosan blue magpies and Taiwanese waterfowl would be before the Formosan Clouded Leopard Memorial, dedicated to the extinct Formosan subspecies of the clouded leopard. Clouded leopards would be exhibited in a tall, lush enclosure.
    African Island Wonders would be a set of six islands in the middle of a lake. The first island would be the largest- Madagascar. A mixed species spiny forest would have giant couas, radiated tortoises, and ring-tailed lemurs. Ground-rollers, red fodies, and several other species of Madagascan birds would live in a walk-through netted aviary. Fossas and ring-tailed mongooses would be right next to each other. Red ruffed, crowned, mongoose, black-and-white ruffed, and Coquerel’s sifaka lemurs would have large, naturalistic, outdoor enclosures before the building. The first part would be Reptiles and Amphibians, with northern spider tortoises, panther chameleons, tomato frogs, Dumeril’s ground boas, Madagascar tree boas, and Madagascar leaf-nosed snakes. The second part would be Animals of the Night, with aye-ayes, gray mouse lemurs, Goodman’s mouse lemurs, and Madame Berthe’s mouse lemurs. There would be a café and gift shop called the Madagascar Café and Lemur Point Marketplace, respectively. The next idland would be smaller and would be Seychelles. Tiger chameleons would have a large outdoor enclosure, followed by an aviary for Seychelles black parrots. Aldabra tortoises would have a large grassy enclosure folowed by dugongs and a reptile house for Pelamis platurus (a sea snake), Lycodon geometricus (a house snake), Seychelles giant tortoises, and various geckos and skinks native to the island. Mauritius would be a set of four netted aviaries for Mauritius kestrels, pink pigeons, echo parakeets, and Rodriguez flying fox bats. Half the bats are kept in an “aviary” but the other half are kept in a walkthrough cave where visitors would be able to walk through with nothing separating them from the bats! The second largest island after Madagascar would be Bioko. The real Bioko Island is west of Cameroon. There would be a large enclosure for Bioko Island drills and three large enclosures for blue duikers, red-eared guenons, and putty-nosed guenons. Giant pouched rats, tree hyraxes, and tree pangolins live in an indoor nocturnal area. The same building would have reptiles native to Bioko, including all four species of chameleon. Forest buffalo live in a five-acre wooded paddock. The buffalo paddock is the last Bioko exhibit before a bridge leads to Sao Tome and Principe. Dwarf olive ibises, Sao Tome fiscal shrikes, and giant sunbirsd would live in large, naturalistic netted aviaries. Sao Tome giant tree frogs, Sao Tome golden caecilians, and Sao Tome shrews live in large enclosures in a small building. The last island represents the Canary Islands. Houbara bustards and the Canarian subspecies of the Egyptian vulture live in large aviaries. El Hierro giant lizards live in a large naturalistic cliffside habitat.
     
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