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COVID-19 effects on zoos and animal conservation

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by DelacoursLangur, 6 Mar 2020.

  1. Ding Lingwei

    Ding Lingwei Active Member

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    The "alligators" are mostly likely Siamese crocodiles, which are also farmed in great numbers in China.“鳄鱼”is the general name for any crocodilian species.
     
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  2. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    A zoonotic disease is simply one spread to humans from animals. That's all that zoonotic means. Zoonoses are very common - there are probably hundreds of them - and a disease being zoonotic doesn't mean that it is just being spread willy-nilly from all animals to humans. Some come from only one animal (e.g. dengue from mosquitoes to humans), while others are more widespread (e.g. Salmonellosis). But you're very unlikely to contract any zoonosis from a visit to the zoo.
     
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  3. AmbikaFan

    AmbikaFan Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but haven't there been diseases of zoonotic origins that continued to affect humans and multiple animal species? Like Orthopox (Cowpox, Horsepox, Monkeypox)? Despite the smallpox vaccine in humans, varrinea is not an entirely effective animal vaccine. And the poxes are still widely contracted and spread by rodents.
     
  4. AmbikaFan

    AmbikaFan Well-Known Member

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    That wasn't my concern. I thought zoonotic diseases could be transmitted both ways and thought a determination of zoonosis would mean animals could contract COVID-19 from humans. Since I thought that had been ruled out, this seemed like a huge development. Thanks, both of you. I know just enough to know very little.
     
    Last edited: 14 Mar 2020
  5. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Diseases transmitted from human to animal are called reverse zoonoses and they certainly do occur, especially to primates and pigs. But a disease being zoonotic doesn't mean that it can just automatically swap back and forth between random species.
     
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  6. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    They often can - but "both ways" would be this:

    Animal A >>> Human
    Human >>> Animal A

    Not this:

    Animal A >>> Human
    Human >>> Animal B/C/D

    Being able to hop between species doesn't mean a pathogen can hop between any species.
     
  7. AmbikaFan

    AmbikaFan Well-Known Member

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    But it can between species and humans, as with the poxes?
     
  8. AmbikaFan

    AmbikaFan Well-Known Member

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    But isn't that precisely what happens with Orthopox? Not species to species, but multiple species back and forth to humans? (Agreeably over considerable time perhaps) Aren't almost all diseases zoonotic between primates and humans?
     
  9. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    There are lots of different zoonoses and reverse zoonoses, and they cover various forms of life - viral, fungal, bacterial, etc. Some are host-specific and some are not. Just because one can infect multiple species does not mean that any other random zoonosis can do the same.

    Also, Orthopoxvirus isn't one zoonosis - it is a group of related species which differ in host range. Smallpox was one of those Orthopoxvirus species, now eradicated, which was host-specific.
     
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  10. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    This being precisely why it was possible to eradicate it, of course.

    Another Orthopoxvirus which is host-specific is Utrecht Rabbitpox.
     
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  11. dt644

    dt644 Well-Known Member

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    Ding Lingwei is right. In the East asian culture, usually call all alligator and crocodile to same name, without distinguishing.(Korean: 악어(ageo), Japanese: ワニ(wani))

    It seems to me that the crocodile consumed for food in China is a hybrid of the Siamese crocodile and the Saltwater crocodile, which are also mass-breeding for leather production in Southeast Asia.

    And the wattle-necked softshell turtle is also an endangered species. This species is rated EN class in IUCN and designated as II class in CITES.
     
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  12. DavidBrown

    DavidBrown Well-Known Member

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    If anyone wants to see this story visualized on film, the [SPOILER ALERT] end of Contagion shows it quite brilliantly.





     
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  13. Junklekitteb

    Junklekitteb Well-Known Member

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    Several sources have claimed these are ring-necked pheasant, so not endangered.

    There are also claims of koalas being sold, but one of the sources earlier confirmed it is actually bamboo rat.
     
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  14. dt644

    dt644 Well-Known Member

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    The fact that the animal that was eaten by the name koala in China was actually a bamboo rat, not a koala, can also be seen in this article that posted nine years ago.

    [​IMG]
    This photo posted in a Chinese article in 2018.
    The animal in the cage is clearly not a koala.
    But you can see that it written '树熊,' which means koala.
    '树' means 'tree', and '熊' means 'bear'. So I think it is named because bamboo rat climb trees and look similar to bears.
     
    Last edited: 15 Mar 2020
  15. lintworm

    lintworm Well-Known Member

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    The picture shows a Marmot, not a Bamboo Rat
     
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  16. dt644

    dt644 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that's why I wrote that picture 'animal,' not a 'bamboo rat.' I could find a few more pictures besides that, but there was an animal that looked like a marmot.
     
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  17. Blijdorpenaar

    Blijdorpenaar Active Member

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    Update from the Netherlands: every single EAZA zoo has been closed untill at least April 6th
     
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  18. FunkyGibbon

    FunkyGibbon Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't worry too much. The government won't allow any harm to come to the zoo.

    Actually in the UK people do farm deer. And apparently we import a lot of farmed venison from New Zealand (who knew!).
     
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  19. AmbikaFan

    AmbikaFan Well-Known Member

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    I was speaking of the US, but this is very interesting to know. Thank you.
     
  20. TheMightyOrca

    TheMightyOrca Well-Known Member

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    San Antonio Zoo is closed.

    I'm seeing a lot of the closed US facilities are trying to keep an active presence on social media. That's a good idea, keep the zoo in people's minds. I'm sure once the quarantine periods are over people are gonna be anxious to go out again. Zoos and other places will definitely need the support. If I qualify for unemployment I'd definitely like to make some trips. I actually planned on going to the SA Zoo last week for spring break but then the outbreak started and I figured I should hold off.