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Create your own Jurassic Park - challenge

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by Jurek7, 23 Nov 2014.

  1. Jurek7

    Jurek7 Well-Known Member

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    Christmas is coming, so a little gift for every young zoo fan. :)

    Don't whine that 'Jurassic Park' was stupid, create your own prehistoric zoo!

    Challenge:
    - You develop zoo with prehistoric animals together with a holiday complex.
    - You have 50km2 land in the warm climate - can be private island off Costa Rica, in Australia, Florida, Spanish Riviera or anywhere else.
    - You have unlimited money and a technology to bring up to 30 species of extinct animals. The technology is already given, you need not to worry about it.
    - You cannot copy anything from 'Jurassic Park' and 'Prehistoric Park' franchises or 'Zoo Tycoon' and similar computer games, besides technology used in real zoos and really existing animal species.
    - You should do it realistic, including knowledge of paleontology as of 2014.
    - You should do it better than Mr Crichton and Spielberg.
    - You must describe in detail how to avoid your animals escaping, and staff and visitors getting eaten (obnoxious lawyers excluded).
    - You have maximum of 1000 words to describe your project. :)
     
  2. TheMightyOrca

    TheMightyOrca Well-Known Member

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    I ACCEPT YOUR CHALLENGE! But only 30 species, it's gonna be so hard to decide! (especially since I've been trying to make a children's comic that involves a Jurassic Park style zoo...)

    My park would be on an island, but I'm not too picky about location. This would prevent escape of any terrestrial animals, along with the aquatic animals kept in tanks and pools. I'd want a place that's not too far from an area with a decent-sized population, that way there will be people who can visit the park without needing to pay extra to stay. The resort where guests stay overnight will be off the island, preferably on the mainland, and the park will be cleared for closing time. No guests in after hours, unless there's a special event.

    Since dinosaurs already get so much attention, I'd really like my park to focus primarily on mammals. There are plenty of incredible prehistoric mammals that get very little attention. Paraceratherium would be one of my biggest stars, with a massive exhibit for it. The exhibit is a mostly open field with some scattered trees and plants, and a barn for shelter. A monorail takes guests around the perimeter. There are multiple stations and guests can get on and off at any one they like, in case they want to stay on one to view. The barn is on the edge of the exhibit, and has a viewing window with both floor level and upstairs viewing. The exhibit would either be pit style with fencing, something the animals couldn't climb out of, or would just be a bigger and stronger version of elephant fences.

    I'd really want some kind of large marine creature as one of the star attractions. I'm rather partial to basilosaurus myself. Since basilosaurus isn't believed to echolocate, I could keep it in a tank or pool without having to worry about the surrounding walls causing sensory or communication issues. The large main pool is visible to guests. I'd like the walls of the tank to be painted a medium-dark shade blue, though if basilosaurus turns out to be darkly colored I may have to go lighter than what I want for the sake of visibility. The tank walls would be painted with a "landscape" often seen in terrestrial exhibits, featuring plants and fauna that existed in the time of basilosaurus. Inside the tank will be rock formations and some sand and rocks lining the bottom of said tank, perhaps with some kelp as well. Guests can take a flight of stairs underground to reach the viewing window on one side of the pool. This aquatic section also features mourasuchus, allodesmus, and ambulocetus.

    I'd definitely want to have a safari attraction that goes through a few different exhibits. I'm thinking smilodon, megaloceros, glyptodon, and some kind of prehistoric elephant/elephant ancestor. Mammoths are out of the question, since it would be difficult to keep them comfortable in such a warm area. Maybe amebelodon?

    I'd really like to have at least one "interaction" exhibit where guests can feed or touch an animal. This is a bit trickier, since we'd need to know about animal behavior to know if they'd be well-suited to such things. I'd try the dwarf elephant, just have a big group of them where guests can stand on one side of the exhibit and feed and touch them at certain times of the day. If prehistoric horse merychippus has the right behavior set for it, they too would take part in a feeding encounter.

    I want to put in a few reptiles and birds, though to keep with the theme, they'll all be post-Cretaceous. The way I see it, you can never go wrong with the terror bird! It would be part of a South America themed area that would also have doedicurus, smilodon, and megatherium. These would be in more traditional zoo style exhibits, though elevated platforms would allow guests to see further into the exhibit. (particularly important for the massive megatherium!) Argentavis magnificens is the star of the South American area, and one of the big stars of the park. This species would be kept in a massive aviary unlike anything that exists, allowing it to fly around as guests watch in wonder. It would also be incredibly strong, lots of steel, since an escaped argentavis has the ability to leave the island. (not to mention could potentially represent a big threat to guests!) There would be a heavily protected pathway that goes through the aviary, allowing guests to view argentavis as it flies above their heads.

    The North America area also is more zoo-like, with moropus, hyaenodon, synthetoceras, and epicyon hayendi.

    An Australia area features megalania, diprotrodon, procoptodon, and thylacoleo.

    Other animals include darwinius, gigantopithecus, arsinoitherium, entelodon, andrewsarchus, macrauchenia, and sivatherium.

    Safety-wise, all large animal exhibits will be built only with the strongest materials. Due to the lack of super massive predators like T-rex, safety shouldn't be so much more an issue than at a normal zoo. Emergency evacuation protocol would exist, and the park would have specialized equipment to deal with the larger animals like paraceratherium. Multiple stations around the park would have emergency equipment in the case of an animal breakout. As with a regular zoo, protected contact is maintained with any large species. Anything involving guest-animal interaction will have at least two trained staff members, and one security guard, supervising. All animals would have GPS tracking chips in the case of an escape.
     
    Last edited: 26 Nov 2014
  3. tschandler71

    tschandler71 Well-Known Member

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    Actually Colombian Mammoth (as opposed to Wooly Mammoth) wouldn't have lived in much colder climates than say Boston or Chicago have now.
     
  4. TheMightyOrca

    TheMightyOrca Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. It is admittedly tempting. Still, I guess I would rather have one of the weirder elephants/elephant ancestors like shovel-face.
     
  5. Lizard_boy

    Lizard_boy Well-Known Member

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    Orca what about mastadons