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Czech giraffe massacre

Discussion in 'TV, Movies, Books about Zoos & Wildlife' started by vogelcommando, 7 Dec 2015.

  1. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  2. kiang

    kiang Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like Dvur Kralove
     
  3. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

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    It doesn't say that it was Dvur Kralove in that article, but is it? It sounds like it could be a very interesting story.
     
  4. reduakari

    reduakari Well-Known Member

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  5. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    it is Dvur Kralove. The article says "...Josef Vagner, the keeper of the zoo at that time who travelled to East Africa to catch the giraffes..."

    Dvur Kralove's history page (http://www.zoodvurkralove.cz/en/about-the-zoo/the-past-and-present/) says "The ’70s were an important time for the zoo, as 8 expeditions were organised to a number of African countries, resulting in around 2000 animals being brought into the collection. This focus on African animals was the brainchild of Josef Vágner (Dipl. Ing. ,CSc.), the zoo’s director between 1965 and 1983. These were largely hoofed animals along with some carnivores, primates, and reptiles. The creatures formed the basis for unique breeding pairs and groups that made the zoo one of Europe’s most important gene banks for numerous African ungulate mammals."
     
  6. sooty mangabey

    sooty mangabey Well-Known Member

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    I have recently read this book - thanks for the tip off, Vogelcommando!

    I have no way of knowing how true to events the narrative is, but it has the ring of truth, and the zoo is written about with great veracity.

    The novel is very reminiscent of Milan Kundera, with a combination of 'straight' narrative, and more dreamlike prose. The description of the slaughter of the giraffes is brilliantly realised; much of the rest of the novel was less successful.

    Overall: decent, but by no means essential.