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David Hancocks on Elephants......

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by patrick, 19 Jun 2006.

  1. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    Hi Zoo Boy,

    In Europe zoos have to observe strict quarantaine regulations and testing procedures for infectious agents before animals are allowed to enter or be exported within the zoo community. However, the administrative obstacles put in place have become so cumbersome that sometimes it is almost impossible to im- or export an animal species (f.i. lesser mouse deer for fear of .... FMD). Zoos (particularly those within the EEC) are not exempt and thus find it hard to set up overseas animal exchange programmes (even if these are required by the need to preserve the genetics in individual wild animal populations in EEP zoos). So, the situation is in someways similar to the Australian experience. However, we have many more zoos and populations of individual EEP programmes are generally large enough to be able to maintain them for a considerable time without outside gene pooling.

    The veterinary regulations for wildlife are in strictest contrast to those for domestic stock. These may be im- and exported ad libitum (since they are considered disease free). However, no vaccination .. nor other vet health measures are taken and thus ... pandemics become a potential threat. Exactly, for these reasons wildlife im- and exports are regulated and vet health testing for wild animals exists, yet for domestic stocks they are not.

    I concur that both should be regulated and only then can we best protect the interests of wildlife conservation and secure the economics of domestic rural farming communities. Preventative vaccination, transparant import and export quarantaine, strict transport regulations and restrictions on the proximity of farms to oneanother are an effective means of combatting any potential vet health risks (long before these occurred eventually) for both wildlife and domestics. All must play their part. If you then transpose this set up to the Australian situation you have a pretty watertight vet health system (MARK already suggested to that effect).

    I hope you do not take this to personally, it is just a matter of opinion.


    Cheers,

    Jelle
     
    Last edited: 8 Jul 2006
  2. Zoo_Boy

    Zoo_Boy Well-Known Member

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    well jelle, our agricultural industry, i say is worth much much more than yours, and we carnt loose, it, as in its worth 50 billion $$$$$$$ , even with so much we carnt risk it
     
  3. patrick

    patrick Well-Known Member

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    i totally understand why we have such strict regulations and believe they vitally important.

    however, whilst our zoos have always managed to get by with virtually no exotic birds, i wonder what the impact of this total ban on cloven-hoofed mammals will have in the log run?

    some animals will die out very soon, like pygmy hippo, bongo and kudu.

    hippopotamus, eland, waterbuck, guanaco....all banned from import.

    even giraffes, those star zoo attractions, who managed to survive decades in australian zoos with just one or two founders, will eventually suffer from inbreeding.

    i wonder how our open range zoos will look in the future with only zebra and rhino on the african plains?

    surely there will be attempts by our zoos to create special exemptions from the ban. as mark said, FMD can be tested. we have quarrentine facilities at zoos. i would have thought zoo-imports are particuarly low-risk...
     
  4. Zoo_Boy

    Zoo_Boy Well-Known Member

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    well i see that nz are allowed some, why carnt they get them, then import to aus, we can only get giraffes off them. so why carnt somebody build a centre over there, import stock, raise for a yr, send to aus? i no this would cost heaps, which is basically wht this whiole argument is money, we carnt afford to build super quarrintine facilities.

    plus or cocos island quraintine is greta, but its the stress to many ungulates that makes them uneaasy to travel and be loaded unloaded multiple times
     
  5. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    Yep pat,

    From that perspective I think it is madness on zoos. I really think ARAZPA zoos should be much more actively canvassing the government for exemption. Surely, if the arguement is explained properly to them and the proper quarantining facilities and vet health regs are in place that it can go forward fairly quickly.

    Also, I think the NZ connection suggestion is also an interesting one. I am sure that if ARAZPA approach our EEP for Rothschildt's giraffe that they would be more than willing to offer some of our genetically surplus individuals for relocation to ARAZPA zoos (in this I am thinking of say 10-15 in one go here!!!!).

    Any good this?

    Jelle
     
  6. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    Guys,

    Whilst this is an interesting discussion to say the least, I wonder what happened to the original purpose the elephant import issue.

    Does anyone have any news concerning when these imports are now likely to happen? Or is that the devil and the deep blue see ..........

    Jelle
     
  7. MARK

    MARK Well-Known Member

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    Looks like it could be November now Jelle. And what is the point of having a Goverment run Quantine Station along way off the coast if we cant use it to import animals from overseas zoos (which) ARE in themselves Quantine stations, is this not go enough??.
     
  8. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    Michelle,

    A response to your outcry for financial support. This is what the US Asian Elephant Fund did in Thailand to support elephant conservation for 2005.

    Follow the link: http://www:fws.gov/international/pdf/DIC_Project_Summaries/05AsE.pdf

    One particular project is building a safe corridor for 2 elephant reserves in Thailand. Another is strengthening management of another elephant reserve.

    Travel the internet and you will find more of these linkages. So, financial support is there. Or if you are not convinced, you might want to put in a bid for your project too.

    Jelle
     
  9. Michelle

    Michelle Member

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    Jelle,
    Thanks for you info but I am aware of the financial support that is out there. My point was that zoos dont give enough financial support in situ and when they do give money it is mostly to wild ele projects. But when they want eles it is not the wild eles they take from the range countries its the domestic eles so why not support people who are doing good work to help the domestic eles in situ. And I mean people who are breeding in situ because these projects are what will ensure the survival of the species.