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Design a Zoo 2018

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by birdsandbats, 31 Dec 2017.

  1. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    {Note from mods - this thread continued from here: Design a Zoo 2017}


    The High Plain
    The High Plain begins with a large flamingo pond containing James' (Phoenicoparrus jamesi) and Andean (Phoenicoparrus andinus) Flamingos. The pond in the exhibit would be heated, allowing the flamingos to have a pond even in the winter. Next is an exhibit similar to the pika exhibit in North American Wilderness, but without the no barrier illusion. This exhibit contains Long-Tailed Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). Next is an exhibit with mountainous terrain for Culpeo (Lycalopex culpaeus). This exhibit is two acres. After this is a small, also mountainous exhibit with large climbing branches for Northern Viscacha (Lagidium peruanum). Next is a several acre paddock for Vicuna (Vicugna vicugna). After this is a large bird exhibit with another heated pool. It contains Titicaca Grebes (Rollandia microptera), Andean Flicker (Colaptes rupicola), and Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus).

    Up Next: Icy South
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 2 Aug 2018
  2. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Icy South
    Icy South begins with a rocky free-flight aviary for Yellow-Billed Pintail (Anas georgica) and South Georgia Pipit (Anthus antarcticus). After this, there are two large, rocky, cove-like exhibits. The first one is for Crabeater Seals (Lobodon carcinophaga). The second is for Southern Elephant Seals (Mirounga leonina). After this is a large penguin exhibit. It is outdoors, but the inhabitants have access to indoors during the summer. It contains Southern Rockhopper Penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome), Gentoo Penguins (Pygoscelis papua), Chinstrap Penguins (Pygoscelis antarcticus), King Penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus), Adelie Penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae), and Emperor Penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri). After this is a similar (but roofed) exhibit for Imperial Shags (Leucocarbo atriceps). Next is another pinniped cove, but this one is much larger. This is for Leopard Seal (Hydrurga leptonyx). Finally, there is a large aviary for Keas (Nestor notabilis).

    Up Next: European Wilderness
     
  3. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to add to my Africa area. The addition to the African area is a series of walk through enclosures featuring ring-tailed lemurs, black and white ruffed lemurs, collared lemurs, crowned lemurs, and mongoose lemurs.

    Australia and New Guinea
    The Australia exhibit is designed in much the same way as the others with a common area in the middle and other exhibits leading into it. The central exhibit resembles the scrub that would be encountered in much of Australia. This exhibit is hilly and is accessed under where the visitors walk. In this area, three exhibits lead into the central area. The first resembles a desert. Red kangaroos and emus are housed in this exhibit. Another has the appearance of a grassland. Common walleroos and eastern gray kangaroos are featured in this exhibit. The third exhibit leading into the common waterhole is a walk-through housing Bennett's, Parma, yellow footed rock wallabies, and Tammar wallabies. These animals are able to enter the common waterhole by going under a fence that is too tall to allow the emus and kangaroos to enter the walk-through area. Black swans and magpie geese swim in a pond here.

    A second walk-through is present and is across from the waterhole. This one houses koalas. Eucalyptus trees are planted throughout.

    A third series of walk-through exhibits features birds of Australia. The first two exhibits resemble the dry outback. One houses budgies, cockatiels, and zebra finches. A second much larger one house sulfur-crested cockatoos, gallahs, and Major Mitchell's cockatoos. A third exhibit is more throughly planted. This house Gouldian finches, princess parrots, and rainbow lorikeets. These are also across from the waterhole.

    Finally, the visitor reaches the last section in this area. This one is dedicated to wildlife of New Guinea. A paddock containing Matschie's tree kangaroos and southern cassowary is across from the waterhole. The animals do not have access to the waterhole and instead stay in their shady exhibit. A final walk-through aviary here houses superb and Raggiana birds of paradise, palm cockatoos, eclectus parrots, and Victoria crowned pigeons.
     
  4. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    This and the High Plain exhibits are great! Can we build this zoo in a cold climate now?
     
  5. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Not yet, there are still more exhibits!
     
  6. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    European Wilderness

    European Wilderness begins with an outdoor aviary for Western Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), Scottish Crossbill (Loxia scotica), and Willow Ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus). This aviary is large, tall, and filled with trees. Across the path from this is a small pond (about the size of the average Koi pond) for European Water Voles (Arvicola amphibius). The voles have access to a behind the scenes area, which is set up like tunnels similar to the ones the animals would create in the wild. Next to this is a small, heated enter-able shelter shaped like a log cabin. Inside this building is a large tunnel system containing Scottish Wood Ants (Formica aquilonia). These tunnels also include a colony of Shining Guest Ants (Formicoxenus nitidulus). The zoo breeds both of these declining ant species both on and off display. There is also a Worker Ant Cafe here that sells food. After leaving the log cabin, there is a large several acre exhibit filled with trees for Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) and Western Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus). Next is another large, tall, tree-filled aviary, but it is not for birds. It contains Eurasian Red Squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris). A sign explains that this species is threatened by invasive Eastern Gray Squirrels. Next is a large, two acre exhibit that is filled with trees. The trees have barriers to prevent the animals from climbing out, but the animal has lots of rocks to climb on on. The animals on display here are Scottish Wildcats (Felis silvestris grampia). After this is an aviary for a rescue Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus). Continuing on the path, a large forested exhibit (3 acres) contains a pack of Eurasian Gray Wolves (Canis lupus). Next to this, a similar 2 acre exhibit contains Alpine Chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra). Unlike the wolf exhibit, however, this one contains lots of climbing rocks. Yet another large, tall, forested aviary contains Yellow-Billed Chough (Pyrrhocorax graculus) and Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta). The next exhibit is a pit in the ground, with climbing rocks going up. This exhibit displays Alpine Marmots (Marmota marmota). These animals are off-exhibit in the winter (due to hibernation). Across the trail from this is another aviary for a rescue raptor, this time a Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). A little further on the trail, there is a two acre exhibit similar to the Scottish Wildcat exhibit seen earlier. The main difference is that this one has less climbing rocks. This exhibit contains Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx). A regular looking exhibit with bars is next. It is filled with climbing branches, and the grass on the bottom is overgrown. It may look small and abusive for any other animal, but it contains Eurasian Harvest Mice (Micromys minutus), and the cage is very large for such a small species. Next is another large and tall aviary (again?) and contains Pine Martens (Martes martes). Three more similar exhibits are next, about an acre each, and forested. One has a large pond. The one with a pond is for Eurasian Otters (Lutra lutra). The first one without a pond is for European Badgers (Meles meles). The second one without a pond is for Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes). Next are two large several acre forested paddocks. One is for Wild Boar (Sus scrofa). The other is for European Bison (Bison bonasus).

    Up Next: The Himalayas
     
  7. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    It's been a while since I last posted here. I think it's time for...
    Amazing Americas: Part 2
    The second part focuses on South American ecosystems. The first one is the Andes ountain range. The area looks like that of a typical South American farm. The visitors first enter a traditional farmhouse, which is home to most of Chile's smaller species. The first animals people would see here are the Andean mountain cat and the cuelpo. Both species have rocky habitats with dens if they need privacy. Next up is a dimly lit enclosure, full of small trees, for a pair of monito del monte. Next up are two enclosures for both short-tailed and long-tailed chinchillas. Nearby signs explain how both species were hunted to near-extinction. An enclosure for montane guinea pigs is nearby both chinchilla species. Nearby, an exhibit for kodkod comes into view. After exiting the farmhouse, visitors are greeted with many large aviaries that contain birds of prey from the Andes. These birds include Andean condors, striated caracaras, black vultures, Aplomado falcons, and mountain caracaras. Next up are three paddocks, with one containing vicuna, one with guanaco, and one with northern pudu. As the trail goes on, shallow pools with Chilean, Andean, and James's flamingos can be see. Close by, spectacled bears have a large enclosure with water to relax and swim in. The last exhibit on this path contains one of the rarest animals in the Andes: the mountain tapir.
    As the visitors pass this enclosure, they reach an archway that says "The Pampas". As soon as the visitors pass through, they are greeted with the sight of two familiar animals from the region: greater rheas and Patagonian maras. Nearby, giant anteaters have a more forested enclosure with natural ant and termite hills to demonstrate their natural feeding ability. Two more exhibits contain pampas cats and southern three-banded armadillos. An exhibit for jabiru storks and an aviary for the rufous hornero, Argentina's national bird are close by. An exhibit for pampas deer and black-legged seriama are next up. A set of enclosures contain many canines of the pampas: Pampas foxes, crab-eating foxes and bush dogs. The last few exhibits here have lesser rheas and maned wolves.
    The last area in Amazing Americas is "Galapagos Journey". This area is located in and around a life-size replica of the HMS Beagle, the ship that Charles Darwin boarded to study the Galapagos. In the ship, native reptiles are either in naturalized terrariums or in large, natural pens. The reptiles include Galapagos giant tortoises, Galapagos land iguanas and all known lava lizards that are endemic to the Galapagos. Outside, there are many aviaries for birds native to the island chain. Fifteen inland aviaries house one of each of Darwin's finches, while aviaries closer to the water house seabirds like blue-footed, red-footed and Nazca boobies, lava gulls and Galapagos penguins. Additionally, two enclosures also house Galapagos fur seals and Galapagos sea lions. Once the visitors leave the section, they can choose to donate to help save any of the environments features in the exhibits.
    Note: Within the Major Building, there will be memorials to recently extinct species. There will also be lodging within the zoo since it is so big. There will be lodging nearby the following areas: Wild Amazon (in an upper area), the Okavango Delta (above the field exhibit), the Islands Building (like the Wild Amazon lodging) and the Rockies (in various log cabins).
    Next time: Oceanian Walkabout.

    -:cool::cool:TheWalrus:cool::cool:
     
    Last edited: 28 Jan 2018
  8. elefante

    elefante Well-Known Member

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    What's a cuelpo? That looks like a neat exhibit, but no room for penguins anywhere?
     
  9. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    1. A culpeo (sorry if I misspelled it before) is a species of South American fox.
    2. I already have Galapagos penguins in Amazing Americas. If you mean other subtropical species of penguin, I will add African penguins to African Safari and Humboldt penguins to a plaza in the Andes mountain themed area. Magellanic penguins will come later; they will be in an exhibit in The Aquarium of the Seven Seas. I'm also adding marine iguanas to Galapagos Journey. Once I finish this zoo, I will create a separate aquarium.
     
    Last edited: 29 Jan 2018
  10. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    I forgot one species of penguin here: Adelie penguins (10:10)
     
  11. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    The Himalayas

    The Himalayas begins with a several acre treeless paddock for Wild Yaks (Bos mutus). It is filled with boulder piles, and has lots of places to climb. Next to this are two almost identical yards, one for Himalayan Blue Sheep (Pseudois nayaur), the other for Bhutan Takin (Budorcas taxicolor whitei). After this is another similar exhibit, but with trees. This is for Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia). Next, are two smaller exhibits, about half an acre each. These are also mountainous, but have a large canopy over the floor that offers tons of climbing opportunities. The first is for Golden Langurs (Trachypithecus geei). The second is for Red Pandas (Ailurus fulgens).

    Next Up: Wild China
     
  12. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Before I get to Wild China, I would like to note that I have decided to add American Badgers (Taxidea taxus) to The Greatest of Plains.

    Wild China

    Wild China begins with a half acre exhibit for Golden Snub-Nosed Monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana). These animals have access to huge climbing structures in the exhibit. The exhibit is netted to keep the monkeys from jumping out. However, the netting is strong enough for monkeys to climb on it, adding even more climbing opportunities. Next is a sevral acre exhibit for the all-important Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The enclosure is built into the forest and offers countless climbing opportunists. Keepers can access sevral points in the enclosue from underground tunnels, so they can but piles of bamboo in places the pandas don't expect. Next is a forested habitat for a pack of Dholes (Cuon alpinus). The Dholes have an half acre pond in their exhibit, in addition to several acre land area. Next is sevral acre paddock for Chiru (Pantholops hodgsonii). Finally is two forested habitats that look like one. One contains Yellow-Throated Martens (Martes flavigula). The other contains Golden Pheasants (Chrysolophus pictus) and Chinese Bamboo Partridges (Bambusicola thoracicus).

    Next: Inner Mongolia
     
  13. evilmonkey239

    evilmonkey239 Well-Known Member

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    Note: this post just lists the species in the Western Hemisphere section of my park, Wildworld, a zoo located in Michigan. The detail of the exhibits will be given another day.
    North American Mountains & Plains

    Featured Animals:
    American beaver
    American bison
    American black bear
    Bald eagle
    Bighorn Sheep
    Black-footed-ferret
    Black-tailed prairie dog
    Bobcat
    Canada lynx
    Cougar
    Elk
    Grey wolf
    Grizzly bear
    Moose
    Mountain goat
    North American river otter
    Pronghorn
    Wolverine

    North American Desert Building

    Burrowing owl
    Chuckwalla
    Collared peccary
    Desert iguana
    Desert tortoise
    Elf owl
    Gila monster
    Greater roadrunner
    Kit fox
    Mexican beaded lizard
    Ring-tailed cat
    Western diamondback rattlesnake

    Tropical South America

    American flamingo
    Arapaima
    Arrau turtle
    Baird's tapir
    Blue and gold macaw
    Brown-throated three-toed sloth
    Bush dog
    Capybara
    Collared aracari
    Common squirrel monkey
    Cotton-top tamarin
    Dwarf caiman
    Dyeing dart frog
    Electric eel
    Emerald toucanet
    Emerald tree boa
    Geoffroy's spider monkey
    Giant armadillo
    Giant anteater
    Giant otter
    Golden lion tamarin
    Green anaconda
    Green iguana
    Hoffmann's two-toed sloth
    Hycinth macaw
    Jaguar
    Kiakajou
    Lowland paca
    Northern tamandua
    Ocelot
    Orange-winged amazon
    Orinoco crocodile
    Panama amazon
    Red-backed poison dart frog
    Red-bellied piranha
    Red-footed tortoise
    Roseate spoonbill
    Scarlet ibis
    Scarlet macaw
    Toco toucan
    White-faced saki

    Andes & Pacific South American Coast

    Andean cock-of-the-rock
    Andean condor
    Chilean flamingo
    Galapagos giant tortoise
    Guanaco
    Humboldt penguin
    Mountain tapir
    Spectacled bear
    Vicuna

    Arctic Tundra & Ocean

    Arctic fox
    Arctic wolf
    Atlantic puffin
    Barren-ground caribou
    Muskox
    Pacific walrus
    Polar bear
    Ringed seal
    Rock ptarmigan
    Snow goose
    Snowy owl
     
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  14. evilmonkey239

    evilmonkey239 Well-Known Member

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    Here are the exhibit details I promised:
    North American Mountains & Plains: the first habitat to come into view is the Great Plains, consisting of an enormous grassy paddock with a few scattered trees and a pond home to the bison, elk, and pronghorn. Smaller habitats alongside display the prairie dogs and ferrets, complete with tunnels for children to climb through and see them underground. Signs highlight the importance of bison to plains native Americans and how both the bison and ferrets nearly died out at the hands of humans but are now increasing in number thanks to conservation. The continuation of the trail has a river area with a large netted aviary for rescued bald eagles, along with a series of signs highlighting its recovery from the brink of extinction and enclosures with underwater viewing for the beavers and otters. The next part of the exhibit is the forest, with netted wooded habitats home to bobcats, lynx, and wolverines. Larger exhibits include one for moose with a large pond, and ones rotated between the grizzly bears, black bears, and wolf pack to simulate the predators, with large glass viewing windows and naturalistic streams. The final leg of the area is the mountain peaks, containing two rocky habitats, one for goats and bighorns and the other for cougars, the latter enabled to watch the former through a predator-prey exhibit. Near the exit is a North American themed gift shop as well as a restaurant dedicated to being as sustainable as possible.
     
  15. evilmonkey239

    evilmonkey239 Well-Known Member

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    North American Desert Building: the largest enclosure, located in the center, displays an artificial desert with a stream home to the peccaries. Around it, the other mammal exhibits are a rocky one for the ring-tailed cats and a sandy one for kit foxes. The burrowing owl habitat includes underground viewing of the owl's burrows. Other birds are represented by elf owls and roadrunners. Smaller but still naturalistic displays house Gila monsters, rattlesnakes, and the other desert reptiles, complete with heat lamps and for some, underground viewing, as well as tarantulas and scorpions.
     
  16. evilmonkey239

    evilmonkey239 Well-Known Member

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    Note that I mention a few species here that I forgot to list earlier.
    Tropical South America Outdoor Area: a large pond with a netted roof that houses the flamingos, ibises, and spoonbills is the first thing visitors see open entering the area. Nearby is a large jaguar habitat with a waterfall and a stream with underwater viewing. The highest point of the habitat overlooks a yard for anteaters, capybaras, and tapirs, which has a pool for the capybaras and tapirs to swim in and artificial termite mounds for the anteaters that keepers can hide food in. Futher down the path is the giant otter habitat with a deep pool where guests can view the mustelids swimming underwater. Across is a grassy bush dog habitat.
     
  17. evilmonkey239

    evilmonkey239 Well-Known Member

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    Tropical South American Indoor Area: The first exhibit guests encounter is walk-through habitat where small rainforest birds fly free while three-toed sloths climb on branches above their heads. They then come to the river area of the exhibit, where large tanks show off the arapaima, electric eels, and piranhas. The arrau turtles, caimans and Orinoco crocodiles can be viewed above and below the water. Next, a series of reptile enclosures displays anacondas, boas, iguanas, and tortoises. The green anaconda exhibit has underwater viewing. Then, giant armadillos, sakis, squirrel monkeys, tamanduas, and two-toed sloths share a mixed-species exhibit. Other displays contain the amazons, coatis, kinkajous, macaws, ocelots, pacas, spider monkeys, tamarins, and toucans, all of which have access to attached outdoor habitats during the warmer months. The final animals showcased are a large terrarium of poison dart frogs. Signs highlight the rate of rainforest destruction, how visitors can help, and how zoos rescued the golden lion tamarin from the brink of extinction. A jungle-themed dining facility is attached to the building.
     
  18. evilmonkey239

    evilmonkey239 Well-Known Member

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    Andes & Pacific South American Coast: the exhibit starts with the cloud forest. Here, neighboring wooded habitats display the mountain tapirs and spectacled bears, both with pools for them to swim in.. A free-flight cage houses the cock-of-the-rocks. As guests increase in elevation, they encounter a large grassy yard of guanaco and vicuna. The habitat also includes a pond of Chilean flamingos. On the other side of the path, an enormous free-flight cage is home to the Andean condors. The "mountain' then gives way to the Pacific coast. A colony of Humboldt penguins has a pool with underwater viewing. Signs put an emphasis on the threats oil and overfishing pose to the birds. The final exhibit is an island mimicking the Galapagos home to giant tortoises.
     
  19. evilmonkey239

    evilmonkey239 Well-Known Member

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    Arctic Tundra & Ocean: the exhibit begins with The Tundra. A yard shared by caribou and muskoxen is overlooked by a habitat home to a pack of Arctic wolves in a predator-prey exhibit. A smaller habitat across the path displays the Arctic foxes. Further along the walk, bird cages hold ptarmigans, snow geese, and snowy owls. Next, we arrive at The Ocean. A free-flight aviary of Atlantic puffins marks the start of the underwater viewing area. A winding tunnel goes through the water of the polar bear, seal, and walrus enclosures. After people come out, the above-water sections of the marine mammal habitats are viewable via a winding path. A series of signs informs visitors about the dangerous effects of human-induced climate change on polar bears and other Arctic animals and how they can help.
     
  20. evilmonkey239

    evilmonkey239 Well-Known Member

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    The species of my African area:
    Sahara

    Addax
    Addra gazelle
    African spurred tortoise
    Fennec fox
    Grevy's zebra
    Naked mole-rat
    Sand cat
    Scimitar-horned oryx
    Slender-horned gazelle
    Striped hyena

    Serengeti Plain

    Aardvark
    African lion
    Bat-eared fox
    Black-crowned crane
    Black rhinoceros
    Blue wildebeest
    Cheetah
    Grant's zebra
    Helmeted guineafowl
    Impala
    Kirk’s dik-dik
    Kori bustard
    Lesser kudu
    Marabou stork
    Massai giraffe
    Olive baboon
    Ostrich
    Saddle-billed stork
    Secretary bird
    Serval
    Spotted hyena
    Thompson's gazelle
    Topi
    Vervet monkey
    Warthog
    White-backed vulture
    White-headed vulture

    African Rainforest

    African grey parrot
    African palm civet
    African pygmy goose
    Allen's swamp monkey
    Bonobo
    Bongo
    Black-collared lovebird
    Black duiker
    Congo peafowl
    Crested guineafowl
    Crowned eagle
    De Brazza’s monkey
    Dwarf crocodile
    Eastern black-and-white colobus
    Egyptian fruit bat
    Great blue turaco
    Lesser bushbaby
    Mandrill
    Okapi
    Potto
    Pygmy hippopotamus
    Red-crested pochard
    Red-crested turaco
    Red river hog
    Red-tailed monkey
    Sacred ibis
    Western lowland gorilla
    White-faced whistling duck

    Okavango

    African elephant
    African clawless otter
    African fish eagle
    African leopard
    African painted dog
    Cape buffalo
    Hamerkop
    Hippopotamus
    Lechwe
    Lesser flamingo
    Nile crocodile
    Nile monitor
    Marsh mongoose
    Kalahari Desert & Skeleton Coast

    African bullfrog
    African crested porcupine
    African penguin
    African puff adder
    Cape fur seal
    Cape ground squirrel
    Cape thick-toed gecko
    Common barking gecko
    Gemsbok
    Ground agama
    Horned adder
    Kalahari giant gecko
    Leopard tortoise
    Meerkat
    Ratel
    Springbok
    Yellow mongoose

    Madagascar

    Aye-aye
    Black and white ruffed lemur
    Blue-eyed black lemur
    Carpet chameleon
    Coquerel’s sifaka
    Fossa
    Grey mouse lemur
    Golden mantella
    Leaf chameleon
    Lesser hedgehog tenrec
    Malagasy giant rat
    Malagasy ground boa
    Madagascar hissing cockroach
    Malagasy killfish
    Mongoose lemur
    Panther chameleon
    Radiated tortoise
    Red-ruffed lemur
    Ring-tailed lemur
    Santanic leaf-tailed gecko
    Tomato frog
     
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