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Design an exhibit challenge

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by CDavies98, 19 Aug 2018.

  1. TheEthiopianWolf03

    TheEthiopianWolf03 Well-Known Member

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    Here is my dolphin complex.

    Tierra del Fuego and Patagonian dolphin centre (PDC)

    Tierra del Fuego is a bunch of islands in Patagonia of the coast of Chilie and Argentina. The region is rich with aquatic wildlife with dolphins and whales being very prevalent in the region. This exhibit is based on that region. The PDC is a research facility that is made to understand reproductive behaviors of dolphins native to the Patagonian region (Bottlenose and Commerson’s). This facility is connected to the public exhibit but is kept off show. Dolphins can move between the public exhibit and the PDC with ease. I’ll explain the actual exhibit now.


    The first thing you see from this exhibit after leaving the mythical Asian grasslands is an arch with symbols of fire and dolphins. It says Tierra del Fuego, the Land of fire. The path under you has silky sand and smooth pebbles and leads to a large building with the same name. You enter to find yourself in awe. Skeletons of large, humpback whales and skulls of blue whales gives you a view into the archipelago without showing you living animals. A wall with model dolphins and whales compare the sizes of these massive animals and makes you feel small. It’s not long until you see your first live animal, the bottlenose dolphins. The sleek, intelligent, creatures have a tank of 1 million gallons total but the public area is half of that, giving the animals enough space for the public eye and the other half in the private viewing from the scientist that work with these animals. The dolphins are in a pod of 7 with the youngest being 1.5 years old. They are very charismatic as they chase kids and adults alike around as they watch the dolphins play. There is an underwater viewing and an above ground viewing, both give great views of the dolphins. Enrichment wise, they have sandy substrate, sponges, balls, fake seaweed, and sometimes live fish in ice. The room they have to swim puts Seaworld’s orca aquarium to shame. You also notice that there is no show for these animals. They still have check ups and feeding everyday and people can come see that instead of a show. Impressed with the quality of life you see with the bottlenoses, you continue past a giant, wall painting with penguins, dolphins, whales, sea lions, and other Patagonian wildlife. You see the other exhibit for the much less known, Commerson’s dolphins. The smaller dolphins have a similar exhibit to the bottlenose dolphins but they do not have an above view of their exhibit. The underwater view is much larger though with the pod of 10 swimming happily with each other without a care in the world. The tank is a bit longer to prevent crashing. The pod actually just had a baby so many people are flocking to see the “panda dolphin”. You read the signs near the exhibit which talks about the dangers of fishing nets and the work the zoo is doing in the region to help this mysterious species. You see the door and leave the magical land of fire, only to realize that it was much less fire, and much more water.

    I’ll take number 5 next.
     
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  2. TheEthiopianWolf03

    TheEthiopianWolf03 Well-Known Member

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    Wait is number 5 taken?
     
  3. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    I think you have gotten confused mistaken, number 5 is one of the ones not yet taken.

    So here is your new challenge:
    Your challenge is to design an aviary complex to hold breeding pairs of the secretary bird, Sagittarius serpentarius, the bateleur, Terathopius ecaudatus, the shoebill stork, Balaeniceps rex, and the African open-billed stork, Anastomus lamelligerus.


    For the sake of clarity:

    Challenges already taken: the numbers 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 and 15
    Challenges still available: the numbers 4, 12 and 14
     
    Last edited: 4 Sep 2018
  4. TheEthiopianWolf03

    TheEthiopianWolf03 Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I was confused for 15. My apologies.

    Finally, home turf. I can’t wait to work with this one!
     
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  5. ajmcwhipsnade

    ajmcwhipsnade Well-Known Member

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    Can I please take number 12?
     
  6. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for participating in topic!

    Rather very good for a first attempt if you ask me! The sloped design of the enclosures with the indoor housing underneath, the addition of the stream for the marsh mongoose (a nice interesting choice of species too) as well as the inclusion of some VR in education I like and find very interesting.

    How big do you see the viewing hut being and how would you avoid overcrowding, as meerkats are generally a very popular species?

    Thank you for participating in topic!

    You did rather well I'd say. That is a very nice design.

    In your vision is this facility located in the home region of these species or not? And do the rhinos have any kind of indoor facility?

    I love your inclusion of education on the plants used as foliage.

    Thank you for participating in topic!

    I appreciate your choice of species. I didn't however know the dhole occured this far north, but some research thought me that indeed it does, or at least has in the past, and possibly still lives in Russia's Far East.

    I would like to know what source you used to select the species?

    Could you also provide a bit more details about what the enclosures look like?

    Thank you for participating in topic!

    I think you came up with a very good solution to repurpose the grottoes. I also appreciate your choice of species.

    The indoor exhibits - will they be the repurposed old indoor bear dens and/or new additions at the backside of the grottoes? Will the entire indoor enclosure be publicly viewable or just one part?

    To keep these smaller arboreal carnivores - most of which or known escape artists - in their enclosures, would you use hotwire or another technique?

    Thank you for participating in topic!

    I like your concept and what you came up with is close to what I would have come up with had I done this challenge myself (although perhaps with one or two different species - although your pick is great).

    How many birds of each species do you think would be kept in this facility and in which group compositions?

    That said, I've not yet seen a curtain to hide or fence-off an off-show area. I've always seen sturdier materials like bamboo, wood, brickwork or fencing. Why your choice for a curtain?

    Thank you for participating in topic!

    This dolphin facility sounds absolutely lovely and I would definitely want to visit it if it existed in real life.

    I like your focus on the Tierra del Fuego region as well as the inclusion of some natural history museum like elements with the skeletons and the passage you included about education.

    I love how you have taken a more natural approach with the enrichment opportunities as well as there being no traditional show, just a training, check-up and feeding presentation.

    I have already given your challenge number 5 in an earlier post.

    Have fun and feel free to fly wild with it!

    Most definitely.

    Your new challenge is:
    Your challenge is to design an exhibit for a breeding group of Pacific walrus, Odobenus rosmarus divergens.

    And to update my little list:
    Challenges already taken: the numbers 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 15
    Challenges still available: the numbers 4 and 14


    Given that there are now only two challenges from my list left I would also like to pose the question whether you people would like me to write up 15 more challenges - I easily could and would love to - or whether someone else would like to take over with their own list.
     
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  7. ajmcwhipsnade

    ajmcwhipsnade Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the comments on both of my exhibits! I enjoyed the challenge, I do have a very vivid imagination so that has definitely helped.

    I imagined the Meerkat/Mongoose viewing hut to be pretty big. I will admit I had not really taken into account the popularity of Meerkats. The viewing hut can be made much larger, with perhaps a one way system put in place in and out of the exhibit.

    Not knowing an awful lot about Birds of Paradise I decided to have just a pair of each species in four separate aviaries. Perhaps all four could be joined to allow mixing and also separation? My choice of curtain was to keep the natural look of a forest. I did also run with the idea of disguising the off show area with a mock Indonesian log house but I felt the camouflaged curtain was more 'natural'.
     
  8. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    1. They are the re-purposed bear dens and are only view-able at one part.
    2. Yes, there is hotwire surrounding the enclosure.
     
  9. ajmcwhipsnade

    ajmcwhipsnade Well-Known Member

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    Also why don't we all think up a suggestion for a challenge? 15 of us could create a challenge each? And then give them to you?
     
  10. Anteaterman

    Anteaterman Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Yes, the facility is located in Sumatra, where wild Sumatran Rhinos live. The Rhinos do have an indoor space. It is not public, because it is where the scientists at the facility research the Rhinos for breeding. :)
     
  11. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your additions and clarifications.

    As for the birds-of-paradise: I think in captivity in general they would be kept individually (given that they are largely solitary in the wild outside of the breeding season) or perhaps in pairs. I don't think it would be a good idea to mix them with other birds or to mix species.

    I understand your reasoning for your design.

    Thanks for your clarifications.

    Thanks for your clarifications!

    That is a pretty good idea!

    From now on anyone who has an idea for an exhibit challenge can send them to me. I will list them and compose the new list from your suggestions.
     
    Last edited: 4 Sep 2018
  12. lycaonpictus

    lycaonpictus New Member

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    Journey to The Galapagos

    To begin your Journey, you enter a building that has signs showing a Map of the Galapagos Islands. Once inside you realize that you are in a tunnel with water all around you. As you proceed down the tunnel, there are signs and displays explaining island endemism as well as adaptation. There also is special mention of how animals and plants can colonize Volcanic Islands that are found so far from the mainland. You realize that the tanks around you are part of two separate exhibits, to the left there is a breeding colony of Galapagos Fur Seal (Arctocephalus galapagoensis) and to the right a large group of Galapagos Sea Lions (Zalophus wollebaeki). Once you exit the tunnel you see how the currents surrounding the Galapagos Islands is recreated here to allow natural behaviour from the Pinnipeds. You are now back outside in the open air. Both exhibits have a rocky shoreline and massive rock projections within the tank to allow the seals to bask in the sun. The Fur Seal exhibit has volunteers stationed to explain the fur trade that plagued so many species in the 1800’s and the impact it had on the Galapagos Fur Seals. The Sea Lion exhibit has scheduled feedings for the Sea Lions where guests can have an opportunity to have an up close and personal experience. Since the Sea Lion’s are known as the “Welcoming Party” of the Galapagos due to their playful nature there are many opportunities for the Sea Lions to play with enrichment items and to interact with guests.

    As you continue along the path it leads you to an 1800’s sailing ship. Inside the ship are terraria for some of the Galapagos’ native reptiles and mammals. There are exhibits for the Galapagos Rice Rat (Aegialomys galapagensis), Fernandina Rice Rat (Nesoryzomys fernandinae), Darwin’s Leaf-Toed Gecko (Phyllodactylus darwini) and Galapagos Racer (Pseudalsophis biserialis). There is also an area describing the Voyage of the Beagle and Charles Darwin’s work on the Galapagos Islands as well as the damage that invasive species such as Rats, Goats and Pigs have caused to the Islands themselves as well as to the inhabitants. Plaques for Extinct Galapagos Species are also inside this ship. These include the Pinta Giant Tortoise (Chelonoidis abingdonii), Floreana Giant Tortoise (Chelonoidis niger), Darwin’s Galapagos Tortoise (Nesoryzomys darwini), Indefatigable Galapagos Tortoise (Nesoryzomys indefessus) and the Least Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus dubius). As you go to exit the ship you enter a small Nocturnal exhibit for one of two non-rodent land mammals native to the Galapagos, the Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus). The bats are free flying around you with the ability for guests to see inside their roosting locations as well. At the end is a netted exhibit for the Galapagos Short-Eared Owl (Asio flammeus galapagoensis)

    Back outside you notice that you are in a scrubland with many trees and plants native to the Galapagos planted to create immersion. The pathway continues along with a short fence on either side to prevent guests from being able to touch the inhabitants of the exhibits. Attached to the Ship’s mast that you just exited is netting that spans over the exhibit allowing some species of birds to be free flying. These species are: The Small Tree Finch (Geospiza parvulus), Galapagos Flycatcher (Myiarchus magnirostis), Vegetarian Finch (Platyspiza crassirostris) and Galapagso Dove (Zenaida galapagoensis). This exhibit recreates the landscape of Isabela Island. On one side of the pathway is a mixed species exhibit for the Wolf Volcano Giant Tortoise (Chelonoidis becki), the Galapagos Pink Land Iguana (Conolophus marthae) and Galapagos Lava Lizard (Microlophus albemarlensis). The other side of the pathway has separate netted exhibits for some Endangered Bird Species found on the Galapagos. Each exhibit recreates the natural habitat of the species to ensure the greatest chance of breeding success. The series of 5 exhibits hold Mangrove Finch (Geospiza heliobates), Medium Tree Finch (Geospiza pauper), Vampire Ground Finch (Geospiza septentrionalis), San Cristobal Mockingbird (Mimus melanotis) and Floreana Mockingbird (Mimus trifasciatus). Volunteers, signs and activities show how the “Darwin’s Finches” adapted to fill the many different niches available to them on the Galapagos Islands.

    The final exhibit in the complex is a massive exhibit that recreates one of the shorelines of the Galapagos. Currents that are pumped through the tank, allow algae to grow along rocks positioned throughout the tank. These feed the Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) that inhabit the exhibit. Rock outcroppings in the water allow the Marine Iguana to bask between feeding dives. This exhibit is netted over and has nesting places for Galapagos Petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia) along the rear of the exhibit. Along the beach two species of flightless birds also share the space with the Iguanas and Petrels, the Galapagos Penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus) and the Flightless Cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi). Signs highlight the dangers of the garbage that enters our oceans and can impact the lives of so many different species that live in and around the ocean. Underwater viewing areas allow guests to observe the penguins swimming as well as the unique Marine Iguana and it’s habits.
     
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  13. FelipeDBKO

    FelipeDBKO Well-Known Member

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    Could you please give me 4, my duke?
     
  14. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    Most certainly. Here it comes:
    Your challenge is to design an area for a breeding pair of polar bears, Ursus maritimus. The complex also has to somehow include the arctic fox, Vulpes lagopus, and at least two Arctic bird species of your choice.

    Only challenge number 14 is now still available. I can tell you it has something to do with New Zealand, so who wants to take it let me now.

    Suggestions for a new list of challenges are still very welcome via personal message to me.
     
  15. ZooBinh

    ZooBinh Well-Known Member

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    Whisper of the Bongo
    This forest trail is heavily planted, with bird and monkey sounds playing throughout the trail, to see as if you are walking through some of the Bongo's natural habitat. You are eventually lead to two small exhibits, for a pair of Forest Giant Squirrel and a pair of Grauer's Broadbill. You are eventually led to a 2-acre exhibit yard with a breeding group of 1.3 Eastern Bongo.
     
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  16. FelipeDBKO

    FelipeDBKO Well-Known Member

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    Thank you ma dawg.



    So Iet's suppose it's located in northern/eastern USA, Canada or some northern Europe country (not in a mood to being too imaginative :rolleyes:).

    The first and smallest exhibit houses four Arctic foxes, separated from the guests by a small river fed by a small waterfall.
    The exhibit is covered in some fake snow, surrounded by lowish rocks (but high enough so they can't be climbed) and has low vegetation in general, except for some small pines and bushes at the corners of the enclosure and a taller pile in the middle, surrounded by scattered piles of rocks, logs, branches and even some Arctic animal-shaped toys (among other more relevant forms of enrichment).
    After reading a sign telling the story of how the arctic foxes were rescued from a nefarious circus (which is obviously false), the guest heads towards the waterfall the small and humble river of the foxes and discovers that it falls from the next enclosure (or at least this is the feeling).

    The second enclosure is a walkthrough aviary housing a numerous group of, let's say, King eiders and Razorbills and, if possible, other Arctic birbs.
    It's set with some slightly artificially snowy low vegetation, rocks, faux ice stalactites/stalagmites, bridges, small waterfalls and pools. At the center, a small plaza with a fountain with a representation of a Great auk and informations/fun facts (like comparing the Great auk to the Razorbills and making it clear that it was extinct by humans) on it, and low glass-height pools similar to those from St. Louis Penguin & Puffin Coast.
    As the guest approachs the exit, several stairs (or ramps) have been climbed until it arrives at a major waterfall and pass near (under - behind) it by a brige, leaving the aviary.

    The third, last and largest enclosure house two of the happiest Polar bears in the captivity world. Just like the aviary, it also looks like this exhibit is feeding the previous one with a waterfall.
    Unlike most Polar bears exhibits, this one floor is low grass instead of an artificial white material, having just some fake snow piles like the other exhibits instead. The vegetation isn't much more than that though, kinda like the tundra vegetation.
    The at least ½ acre enclosure is surrounded by high rocks. In the very back of the enclosure, the largest waterfall of the complex comes from above some of these high rocks and, since the enclosure is slightly inclined, the water falls through forming other waterfalls and even some small pools, until draining into the main pool from where the guests can see the bears.
    Some rocks are scattered around the enclosure, whether isolated, surrounding the water or forming structures like small caves. Also, the rocks won't reach and break the glass if they roll down the hill, which is already unlikely by prevention alone. There's some enrichment in the exhibit too.
    After leaving the complex, the guest can still climb a bridge and get a view from above the bears behind the high rocks that surround the enclosure.
    Since the exhibits are located in a cold location, cooling and "ice waterfalls" are less common.



    (OBS: Can anyone please correct my grammar if you notice something wrong (mainly if it's the use of in/on/at)? Except for the first sentence of this post and the word "birbs".)
     
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  17. FelipeDBKO

    FelipeDBKO Well-Known Member

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    Number 14, please.
     
  18. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    Number 14:
    Your challenge is to design a complex for the holding, display and breeding of the notorious birds of New Zealand: the North Island brown kiwi, Apteryx mantelli, the kea, Nestor notabilis, the kaka, Nestor meridionalis, the kakapo, Strigops habroptila, and the South Island takahe, Porphyrio hochstetteri.

    I will try to compile the new list of challenges as soon as possible. Suggestions are still welcome.
     
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  19. FelipeDBKO

    FelipeDBKO Well-Known Member

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    National New Zealand Zoology Conservation Centre (NNZZCC), or any name with an acronym that has multiple repeated letters and ends with "Centre" because most fantasy zoo makers think it's chic.

    After an arch with the letters "NNZZCC" and a replica of one species of the zoo above each letter, there's a brige going over a small river as if the other side of the river was a heavily planted island, with a sign: "Welcome to the South Island!". After a short walk, there's a small maori-like building with a sign next to it: "Kea house". Indeed, inside the building, there's a glass wall that allows the guests to see not one but two tall square aviaries, which can be connected or not and both measuring 10x10m and holding one pair of keas each. Most of the aviary is heavily planted but most of the trees are significantly shorter than the aviary so the keas have some free-flight room.
    Leaving the Kea house, there's another river and, consequently, another bridge. This time, though, before reaching the other "island", the bridge leads to another building similar to the Kea house, but this time it's for a male kakapo (or, rarely, a pair). It's an 2m high 300m² octagonal aviary with a circular roof, except the corner of the roof is cylindrical and taller, giving room for a tall tree and climbing/hiding/enrichment structures. Some parts of this enclosures are less planted than the keas's. The viewing area is really discreet.
    After not just leaving the Kakapo house but crossing the bridge, the guest arrives at the "North Island" and is greeted by the first and last mixed exhibit of the complex, a tall 400m² aviary housing a group of North Island kakas and pukekos (if you allow me). Among all the enclosures, this is the more watery one, containing not only a small river but some waterfalls too.
    The next building in sight is bigger and perceptibly different in comparison to the previous ones. Inside, it's a nocturnal house. On one side, a gift shop with plush toys from the iconic New Zealand animals seen in the zoo, among other things. On the other side, a display of eggs and feathers from New Zealand birds, rheas, emus, ostriches, and so on. Finally, located at the front, separed from the guests by a low fence and, in a lower height, a glass wall, one of the North Island brown kiwis. The 200m² enclosure is mostly heavily "planted" and continuously supervisioned to prevent guests from stressing the animal, so luckily it don't hide so much or stay more still than a kiwi (fruit).
    After leaving this major building, the walking direction changes and the guests return to the South Island by a bridge, unmasking two 150m² aviaries (which can be connected or not) housing a pair of wekas (again, if you allow me). This one may be the exhibit with less plants, but has small climbing structures such as fallen logs.
    And finally, a pair of takahes housed in a 300m² aviary, similar to the weka's in vegetation but with more water.


    All the animals (except for the kiwis, that have a indoor nocturnal house) are housed in outdoor aviaries but can only be seen through indoor glasses.
    Each "house" is filled with animal facts signs and other things.
    Maori-like patterns, archicteture and structures can be spotted during the visit.
    There are off-show enclosures.
    And last but not least, it's a guided tour.




    You can give me another number if you want to :) Though I'm not sure when/if I'll be able to finish it.
     
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  20. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    Number 14 which you just did rather very well was the final number of the current list.

    I am working on compiling a new list based on some of my ideas and suggestions by a few people.

    It should be completely done Wednessday evening my time at the very latest, at which point I will let you people know in this topic that numbers can be picked from the new list.
     
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