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Design an exhibit challenge

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by CDavies98, 19 Aug 2018.

  1. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    A very lovely design and I really appreciate you posting it so quickly.

    It is also very nice that you included an invasive species and the associated environmental story-telling into your design.
     
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  2. Samantha

    Samantha Member

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    ok. Maybe 100 square metres for the honey badgers then? Idk. For the hunting dogs I was thinking a group of maybe 20 and it would be a group with the two main dogs who breed and the others nurse the pups.
     
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  3. Ebirah766

    Ebirah766 Well-Known Member

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    This topic has almost been inactive for a month, but I want to do challenge 4.
     
  4. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    I'd like to have challenge #6 please.
     
  5. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    Happy to oblige and see this topic temporarily activated again.

    Your challenge is to design a complex for Australian predators. The complex should include the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), at least one other marsupial predator, at least one predatory bird species and at least three species to represent Australia’s rich herpetological fauna, including at least 1 venomous species.

    Your challenge is to design a complex or exhibit to hold a breeding group of at least 2 pairs of Okapis (Okapia johnstoni) and at least 2 other Artiodactyls from the rainforests of the Congo and West Africa of your choice.
     
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  6. Ebirah766

    Ebirah766 Well-Known Member

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    Ok, let's get this going.

    As we walk down the main zoo path, we see several large, red rocks. "What is this?" you may ask. Well, fear not (even though you have no reason to fear), for it is the Australian Hunters exhibit, connected onto the previous macropod area. The red rock area is a place where people can learn about the various Aboriginal tribes of the Australian Outback. In the rocks, a large, open-topped exhibit much like the Honolulu Zoo's Nile monitor exhibit (but it's not lowered down into the ground) features several large rocks, and a grainy sand floor, as well as a small pool in an indoor area and an umbrella in the corner for shade.
    (1.1 Perentie)

    Further down the Outback, there is a large, netted aviary in the crevice between two large rocks. This is home to a species of eagle native to this area, the only endemic species. It features several rope areas to squash around on as well as a dead tree in the corner and two hatches leading to two different indoor areas, as well as various Outback plants, even a tumbleweed provided for perching.
    (1.0 Little eagle)

    The final two exhibits in the Outback are two in-wall terrariums. The first is sandy with a brown rock off to the side, and a branch as well as a small pool of water.
    (1.0 Inland taipan)

    The second one is the same size, about 5 feet tall and 20 feet long, it has red sand and 2 rocks, one to the left and one to the right. A small waterfall runs through the exhibit, while a few tiny plants dot the area.
    (1.1 Western blue-tongued lizard)

    Heading through the rocky area, it slowly transitions to an Australian forest. Gum trees dot the area, while native Australian plants can be seen growing here to encourage captive breeding within the exhibit grounds. The first exhibit is an in-ground glass walled exhibit home to one of the most famous carnivorous marsupials. It is heavily forested, filled with dead leaves and undergrowth and occasionally dotted with a tall plant or small stream. Signage explains the plight of this species with specialized cancer.
    (1.1 Tasmanian devil)

    Heading through the forest we briefly return to the desert as a netted red sand area shows us a pair of obscure carnivorous mammals. It is a heavily grassed area, in the back is a wooden platform used for access to their night houses. A small pool is filled up by a waterfall in the right of the exhibit.
    (2.2 Crest-tailed mulgala)

    So, that was the carnivorous marsupials. The final gallery is within a massive tan boulder, it is called the Predator Hall. It features a huge amount of Australian predators, mainly smaller ones. The first area of the complex features various small in-wall cube exhibits, which various invertebrates call home.

    (1.1 Humped golden orb-weaver spider)
    (5.5 Polistes humilis)
    (0.1 Sydney funnel-web spider) (her name is Henrietta)
    (1.1 Redback spider) (in separate cubes)
    (1.1 Whitetail spider)
    (1.1 Allothereua maculata)
    (1.1 Archimantis sobrina)
    (1.1 Archimantis armata)
    (1.1 Wood scorpion)
    (1.0 Giant centipede) (his name is Rick)
    (1.1 Scolopendra subspinipes)

    Well, that was a lot. Continuing past the cubes, we see three exhibits for Australian snakes. One of them is forested, and other two are more like a rainforest area.
    (1.1 Common death adder)
    (1.1 Green tree python)
    (1.1 Brown tree snake)

    OK, so continuing down the dark path as we hear the sounds of nothing, there is a huge 5 foot tall 10 foot long terrarium holding an invasive species to Australia. It is muddy and gross and there is a drier area for the animals to go to with a small pool if they don't like it.
    (1.1 Cane toad)

    Right around the bend from this area is a massive exhibit with a main viewing window and a second, smaller one. The first one has a log, a waterfall, aquatic plants and two large reptiles. The second one provides a land view as well as a little easter egg exhibit implanted underground of the main land area.
    (1.1 Australian freshwater crocodile)

    The easter egg exhibit is a small cubic terrarium home to several quirky non-predators. It represents an Australian woodland, with branches and tiny cute little plants.
    (2.2 Diamond weevil)

    Fimally, the last area is an ocean habitat zone thing. The first exhibit here is one of those exhibits where it's like curved (like this l--\) It holds a pair of the one of the deadliest cephalopod. The exhibit is also rocky.
    (1.1 Southern blue-ringed octopus)

    There are 2 final exhibits here, leaving room for expansion. Basically the same exhibit slightly to the right of the octopus area, and a huge, sandy, rocky reef tank home to 2 of Australia's famous camosharks.
    (1.1 Reef stonefish)
    (1.1 Tasseled wobbegong)

    As you leave, hoping for expansions, you realize there was never an exhibit in the first place!

    jk there was you can head back to the entrance if you like.
     
    Last edited: 27 Feb 2019
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  7. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    The exhibit starts off with a view of 2.2 Lowland bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus eurycerus). Their exhibit is planted enough so visitors can see then in full view and how they would look if they were blending in with the forest. Nearby, another set of enclosures will hold 2.2 Jentink's duiker (Cephalophus jentinki). The two pairs will rotate exhibits, each one having moderate foliage. The exhibit ends with two enclosures, each one housing 1.1 Okapi (Okapia johnstoni), which are able to rotate exhibits, similar to the Jentink's duikers. One of the two okapi enclosures will have 1.1 Zebra duiker (Cephalophus zebra) and the other will have 1.1 Red-flanked duiker (Cephalophus rufilatus). The duiker can move to their own separate enclosures if they feel alarmed and need a break from the larger okapis. Each of the animals also has a large indoor space for each group of animals.
    Can I do challenge 3 please?
     
  8. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    @Ebirah766 I love your design. I appreciated your attention to detail and your extensive selection of species, including invertebrates and fish, very much.

    If this exhibit truly existed and I could visit it, it would get me very excited as someone who does really appreciate Australian fauna.

    @TheGerenuk Nice design and nice choice of species.

    Your new challenge:
    Your challenge is to design a large walk-through aviary with at least 10 bird species. You have complete free choice in terms of concept, theming and bird species as long as the species are all housed together, at least most of the time. As the aviary is located in a zoo in a temperate climate region partially visible indoor housing should be included.

    Also, with that challenge given out all of the challenges on my list have been used up.
     
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  9. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    An indoor aviary will contain the following species, all endemic to Central South America:
    Elegant crested tinamou
    Orinoco goose
    Brazilian merganser
    Yellow-billed teal
    Blue-throated piping guan
    Horned curassow
    Dark-backed wood quail
    Spot-winged pigeon
    West Peruvian dove
    Hoatzin
    Dark-winged trumpeter
    Blackish rail
    Sunbittern
    Jabiru
    Maguari stork
    Stripe-backed bittern
    Scarlet ibis
    Roseate spoonbill
    Resplendent quetzal
    Amazonian motmot
    Toucan barbet
    Keel-billed toucan
    Toco toucan (in a separate aviary within the aviary)
    Harpy eagle (in a separate aviary within the aviary)
    Plate-billed mountain toucan
    Guianan toucanet
    Lettered aracari
    Red-spectacled amazon
    Sun parakeet
    Golden conure
    Lear's macaw
    Hyacinth macaw
    Spix's macaw
    Blue-throated macaw
    Scarlet macaw
    Blue-and-gold macaw
    Great green macaw
    Sapayoa
    Spangled cotinga
    Capuchinbird
    Plush-crested jay
    Red-crested cardinal
    Long-wattled umbrellabird
    Andean cock-of-the-rock
    Depending on the species, if there are any eggs, they will be moved to a protective area where they will be able to hatch without any problems. The parents of the offspring will also be moved as well.
     
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  10. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering: will you post another series of challenges?
     
  11. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    Given that I have now done two series already, that the last one hasn't gone too well (i.e. the long intervals between periods of activity in this topic) and that I assume that had something to with the nature of my challenges, as well as that I'm sometimes really low on energy (and I would say I'm fairly low right now), I honestly would rather not do another series of challenges, unless you guys insist I do.

    If anyone else is willing to come up with a series of challenges I would be very glad for them to do so. I might even take up a challenge or two then.
     
  12. Ebirah766

    Ebirah766 Well-Known Member

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    I'll do the new challenge series.
     
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  13. Ebirah766

    Ebirah766 Well-Known Member

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    We have 12 new challenges. Select one and I'll give you a choice(s) as to what you will be designing.
     
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  14. Zoovolunteer

    Zoovolunteer Well-Known Member

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    I will start the ball rolling - what do you have?
     
  15. Ebirah766

    Ebirah766 Well-Known Member

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    ... you have to say a number and then you'll get a challenge.
     
  16. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    I would like challenge number 12, please.
     
  17. Ebirah766

    Ebirah766 Well-Known Member

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    Design a bird house specifically for passerine birds and describe their amazing diversity.
     
  18. KevinB

    KevinB Well-Known Member

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    That is not an easy one at all! I'll need to do a fair bit of research, so I hope you'll grant me some time to get back to you on this one.
     
  19. Ebirah766

    Ebirah766 Well-Known Member

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    Sure thing buckaroo.
     
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  20. TheGerenuk

    TheGerenuk Well-Known Member

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    Can I have number 7?