Join our zoo community

Do you think that zoos will last?

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Flyriver256, 25 Apr 2016.

  1. Flyriver256

    Flyriver256 New Member

    Joined:
    25 Apr 2016
    Posts:
    2
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    So, with all of these scary developments that the anti-zoo people are making (Like the banning of orca breeding at SeaWorld) some people in the media are making it look like zoos' days are numbered.:(

    I'm personally unsure about they're long term future. I hope they survive.

    What do you all think?
     
  2. Pleistohorse

    Pleistohorse Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    30 Jan 2013
    Posts:
    481
    Location:
    Alaska
    There will always be zoos somewhere.
     
  3. azcheetah2

    azcheetah2 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    2 Nov 2011
    Posts:
    565
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    Nobody is banning orca breeding at Sea World. They chose to stop. And what are the "all the scary developments"?
     
  4. Flyriver256

    Flyriver256 New Member

    Joined:
    25 Apr 2016
    Posts:
    2
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Sorry, I didn't mean to say that they banned orca breeding. But the reason they chose to stop was because of the massive out-cry from animal rights activists and the media.

    This is I meant by scary developments. Stuff like the fairly recent vilification of SeaWorld, and the drop of zoo attendance within North America. Increased pressure from animal rights activists could push zoos to edge in 20-30 years.

    As a zoo-lover, these kinds of things do sound scary.
     
  5. taun

    taun Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    3,615
    Location:
    England
    Actually your wrong there they stopped breeding them as it made the most financial sense ;)
     
  6. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2015
    Posts:
    908
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Zoo attendance within North America has actually been increasing, and at a faster rate than can just be accounted for by population growth. Most zoos in the US have been setting record annual attendances in the last five years.
     
  7. ThylacineAlive

    ThylacineAlive Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    20 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    5,456
    Location:
    Connecticut, U.S.A.
    I've also heard that it was due, at least in part, to pressure from rights activists. Whether they've been publicly announcing that is another matter.

    As for other "scary events" perhaps he is referring to all the new recent laws that have been passed/are in the works in the US such as the banning of large boas and pythons across state borders, the banning of salamander/newt crossing state borders, and a similar deal with turtles. I suppose this affects the private sector and pet trade more than zoos, but I do believe zoos are affected by the snake one at least. Expect to see a large decline to large snakes in zoos in the upcoming future.

    ~Thylo:cool:
     
  8. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2015
    Posts:
    908
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Is there a reason why you expect large snakes to decline in zoos? It's still legal to source snakes within state borders, and you can apply to the FWS for permits to make interstate exchanges for zoological and scientific purposes. I was under the impression that many species are already under these kinds of restrictions, and I can't imagine these new regulations are injurious enough to shut them out.
     
  9. ThylacineAlive

    ThylacineAlive Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    20 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    5,456
    Location:
    Connecticut, U.S.A.
    Well I'm not sure about how this affects FWS permits but outside of that I'd imagine it depends on whether the private/pet sector has a self-sustaining population within each state. The person who was telling me about the laws said some zoos are having/going to have trouble sourcing new large snakes, implying a decline of sorts.

    ~Thylo:cool:
     
  10. Coelacanth18

    Coelacanth18 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2015
    Posts:
    908
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I suppose that's possible. Since permits will still allow exchanges between zoos in different states, I wonder if it will lead to these species being managed rather than being primarily sourced by private breeders.
     
  11. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    17,363
    Location:
    everywhere
    the pythons and boas in question are only banned from interstate transfer and from importation into the country. It doesn't affect private people nor zoos from keeping and breeding the snakes. And zoos can easily apply for permits for interstate transfers, because the law is primarily designed to stop releases/escapes from private individuals.

    The only way it will mean "a large decline [of] large snakes in zoos in the upcoming future" is if the zoos actively choose not to display them.
     
  12. ThylacineAlive

    ThylacineAlive Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    20 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    5,456
    Location:
    Connecticut, U.S.A.
    Fair enough then. I didn't mean to imply that it meant the private sector or zoos couldn't breed or keep them, just meant in the long run if it were more difficult to obtain them, then we might see a decline. But I'm glad to hear that I was wrong about the severity of the law, thanks for the correction.

    ~Thylo:cool:
     
  13. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    17,363
    Location:
    everywhere
    the "severity" depends on who you listen to. For python/boa breeders - especially breeders of morphs which are worth more - it is a major issue because they can no longer sell anything they breed except within their own state (i.e. it could potentially impact their businesses heavily because they cannot trade nationwide).

    For zoos it is not really any issue at all.
     
  14. TheMightyOrca

    TheMightyOrca Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    28 Jan 2014
    Posts:
    1,307
    Location:
    League City, Texas
    Zoos aren't disappearing any time soon. They'll change, of course, (look at zoos 100 years ago; if zoos never changed they probably would have lost a lot of popularity over welfare concerns. Maybe in 100 years people will look back at todays zoos and say "How barbaric! Good thing our zoos are so much better!") but the anti-zoo crowd is a vocal minority. Also, a lot of the laws that restrict/ban ownership, transport, or importation of certain animals mostly affect the private sector. Usually the laws are made out of fear that a species will escape or get released and become invasive or introduce a disease. Zoos are trusted to be more careful on that front.

    I also wouldn't consider the orca thing as a sign of things to come because SeaWorld is a for-profit theme park, not a zoo. They always have and always will make different decisions than the average zoo will. It's also worth noting that people have been criticizing SW for decades, it's not a new thing. (though it certainly has become more popular) The increase in criticism of SW has more to do with changing attitudes about the use of animals for entertainment, kind of like how people are less tolerant of circuses now.