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Do zoos in america keep you farther away from animals enclosures

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by marmoset23, 16 Mar 2021.

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  1. marmoset23

    marmoset23 Active Member

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    While looking through the gallery I noticed that many European zoos allow visitors to get right up to the mesh without a secondary barrier. Is this common in Europe and why do you think this isn’t repeated across the pond? Thanks in advance for replies.
     
  2. TinoPup

    TinoPup Well-Known Member

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    Safety. Lawsuits.
     
  3. Strix

    Strix Well-Known Member

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    If the animal contained is particularly dangerous, there will often be a small fence about a foot in front of the barrier in UK zoos. However, a lot of thoughtless guests climb over that fence, and I haven’t seen or heard of any incidents happening.
     
  4. Andrew Swales

    Andrew Swales Well-Known Member

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    No, not 'a foot'.
    It is a legal requirement that a stand-off barrier prevents anyone from leaning over and touching the enclosure fence.
    Unless of course it is in a Safari-Park where there is no barrier at all, (let alone a second one) - as the car window/door is under the control of the visitor.
     
  5. Jurek7

    Jurek7 Well-Known Member

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    Not safety, only lawsuits. What is really strange / funny / illogical / crazy is that outside zoos, there is much more chance of being injured by a dangerous wild animal than in Europe. Alligators in roadside canals in Florida, bears breaking into parked cars in California, bison grazing next to public paths in Yellowstone, rattlesnakes on a jogging path right next to Seaworld San Diego and so on. And people are fine with it. The only difference is, apparently, that in the U.S. law one cannot be sued for an attack of a wild animal.