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Dunfermline Avifauna - edited!

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by lowland anoa, 21 Aug 2016.

  1. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Well, seeing as my old birdpark idea had a lot of mistakes and controversial designs, I thought it was best if I created another thread based on the old and worthless thread, but edited to solve mistakes. However, the design will not be the same, as I keep changing my ideas to add exciting and rare birds. The park will focus on birds in need of conservation help and many birds that are not common in captivity in Europe and the USA. The park will still have some common species such as flamingos and starlings. The park'll be about 70-100 acres, this could be smaller or larger, but never mind.

    Here are the exhibits:
    African Journey: From North to South
    Asian Trails
    The Isolated Continent
    The Modern Dinosaurs
    Colourful Amazon
    The Birds of the Seven Seas
    Penguins of Scotland!
    North America: The Mystery of the Quetzal
    Our Home Continent

    Hope the new park will be good, with a few mistakes, not like the last time! Hope you all will like the renewed park!
     
  2. bongorob

    bongorob Well-Known Member

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    The Isolated Continent, is it Australia?
     
  3. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Yes, as easy as Australia isn't connected to any other continent! :p
     
  4. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    North America: The Mystery of the Quetzal's first part should be out on Tuesday or Wednesday, if I have enough time.
     
  5. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    I'm really sorry for the delay, but The Birds Of The Seven Seas, should be out tonight, rather than North America: The Mystery of the Quetzal.
     
  6. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    The entrance of the zoo is designed to feel like you are in an aviary, with speakers playing bird sounds to make the entrance more realistic. There are a few tropical plants and a waterfall with koi carps just swimming around. Visitors can book their tickets online or via the entrance. Adult price is £12.00, kids from 5-18 is £6.00, babies is free and seniors from 60+ is £8.00. When you enter the Avifauna, you'll see a sign pointing the direction to Birds of the Seven Seas with a sign with a excited Peruvian Pelican with a bubble saying "Come on, to see us! The exhibit uses a single large man-made lake with saltwater. The entrance is designed to look like a pirate ship, this is the indoor viewing. Guests remain inside for the duration of the exhibit. In the middle of the ship is a café and a keeper speech area. The first enclosure is for Peruvian Pelican, the highlight of this particular exhibit. The pelicans also reside with Great Cormorant and White-breasted Cormorant. The exhibit is of beach design with rocks at the back. The land area is sandy with long grass at the back of the beach. The water area is about ten foot deep with rocks and pebbles at the bottom. During feeding times, live sardines and anchovies are released in the water to stimulate our birds' catching skills like in the wild. At the back is the indoor quarters that visitors can view during the winter via a path to the left of the enclosure. Across from the pelicans and cormorant is a pelican enclosure with Eastern Brown Pelican and Laughing Gull. The enclosure is very rocky with a small beach area and a large water area. At the back is a replica of a wooden bridge. Near the enclosure is a spacious enclosure for American White Pelican and Inca Tern. This enclosure is similar of design as the second enclosure.


    Here are the amount of European collections that holds the shown species:
    Peruvian Pelican: 3 collections (2 German & 1 French
    Great Cormorant: Zero collections
    White-breasted Cormorant: 1 collection (Parc de Branféré in France)
    Eastern Brown Pelican: 3 collections (all German)
    Laughing Gull: 1 collection (Tierpark Berlin in Germany)
    American White Pelican: 5 collections (4 German & 1 Czech)
    Inca Tern: 28 collections: (9 German, 1 Belgian, 3 Danish, 3 French, 1 Italian, 4 Dutch, 1 Portuguese and 6 British)
     
  7. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Have just started typing up the next part of Birds of the Seven Seas
     
  8. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    How safe are pelicans with other birds? They tend occasionally to try and eat cats, ducks and the like. Actually they have been proven to eat grown ducks but I have no idea how common it is.

    Yes, I know some zoos keep them with ducks but I have to wonder how many go missing...

    Being much larger I guess big cormorant and gannet species are safer with them as adults. But the gulls?
     
  9. bongorob

    bongorob Well-Known Member

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    In 1972 Audubon Park Zoo, New Orleans opened a walk-through water bird aviary. The entrance measured 3 x 3.7 metres, no hight given, and the main aviary was 36 x 15.2 x 15.8 metres. and included a pool covering 184 square metres. visitors oberved the birds from a 50 metre long elevated walkway.

    species housed were

    ducks
    pintail, redhead, blue-winged teal, American green-winged teal, red-billed whistling duck, fulvous whistling duck, wood duck, Mandarin duck, snow goose

    herons

    scarlet ibis, glossy ibis, roseate spoonbill, white-necked heron, common egret

    pelicans

    American white, brown

    rails
    American coot

    gulls
    common gull, Inca tern

    cormorants
    guanay, olivaceous.

    Reference: International Zoo Yearbook volume 13 page 228.
     
  10. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Such aviaries are amazing, but how common is predation, especially nest predation? TBH having seen a heron eat a pigeon... ;)

    Historically, mixed flights were not designed for breeding any of the species, and relied on size to minimise antagonism. Including the risk of predation ofc.
     
  11. bongorob

    bongorob Well-Known Member

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    Nothing more was published in the Zoo Yerbook. I assume predation and inter species conflicts were common, but I do not have any evidence one way or the other.
     
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  12. bongorob

    bongorob Well-Known Member

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    I copletely forgot. chester kept pelicans in the waterfoiwl aviary for at least 10 years/ They seemed to keep themselves to themselves and seldom strayed from their island,it was nice to see them perching in the trees occasionally.
     
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  13. SealPup

    SealPup Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps the predation is atypical/learned behaviour. But it is well documented by now and it would be nice to know more about "accidents" with pelicans in zoos.
     
  14. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Northeastern Wisconsin Zoo keeps an American White Pelican with several species of ducks, and used to keep it with a Turkey Vulture. I don't think there was any problems.
     
  15. Kakapo

    Kakapo Well-Known Member

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    Wow! This is an exquisitely detailed fantasy zoo! Many of the similar threads just limit to the species list, numbers and sexes of each and very brief description of enclosures. But adding entry prices, special design of signage, ambient of exhibit entry, location of keeper talks, ways of enrich the behaviour of the birds, etc... it's much more realistic and easy to translate your mind into the visit to the zoo. Congrats!

    By the way, I saw pelicans housed with cormorants (and also, even more often, with waterfowl) in various zoos - and assumed they never had a problem- and I think that if pelicans are enough well feeded with fish, they will not attack pigeons, ducks and gulls. But there is a problem of a different kind: great cormorants and white-breasted cormorants are so closely related that many authors considerate them as subspecies of the same species. So, housed together, they will interbred making hybrids that can be fertile with great probability... and the population will turn slowly entirely hybrid if not managed specifically for avoid that.
     
  16. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Birds of the Seven Seas: continued
    To the right of the American White Pelican and Inca Tern enclosure is a much larger enclosure. This enclosure contains a shallow sea area, with a mud/sand substrate. The design of this enclosure is quite bizarre, looking like a dry river bank, but with a grass/sand mixture. There are quite a few bare trees in the back, adjacent to a rock bank measuring 35 feet tall. This is to mimic the Indian coastline.
    Species include Spot billed Pelican, Western Reef Heron, Brown-Headed Gull, Grey Heron and Red Wattled Lapwing. The Brown-Headed Gull colony is the only one of their kind kept in European captivity. However, the Grey Herons are typically viewed as being predatory, which is true, so they are typically kept away from the other birds during mating season due to the fact they usually predate on eggs and juveniles. Continuing the path, visitors will see a spacious aviary that is viewable all year long. The aviary is roughly 1,200 square feet. The aviary has a forested area at the back with various species of trees, many logs and sticks at the bottom with assorted vegetation. As get further forward and closer to the front the design gets more rocky and sandy. There is a large water area (500 square feet) with rocks and a viewing window. And a cliff wall is present with many ledges for perching. In the middle of the water area, there is an island with rocks surrounding it. The island has two trees and an abandoned house ( the indoor quarters ). The aviary is home to our group of Steller's Sea Eagle. There is various signages explaining their way of life (hunting, mating, growing up, ranges, etc.) By this point, visitors will realise that there many more seabirds to see, with the exhibit being designed as a circular path around the enormous ship, with an entrance and exit. So next to the sea eagles, is an Arctic enclosure. This is an enclosure you can view all year as the birds in it are found in the Arctic, so the Scottish weather is perfect for them. The enclosure will bring an Arctic feel. There is a huge rock abundance here, complete with cliffs and an rock island in the water area. The beach is somehow rocky and a mixture of wet sand (which is regularly washed with sprinklers to keep the Arctic vibe alive. Keepers will regularly hold talks outside the enclosure, explaining how these birds vy for survival in the Arctic. Species found here are Smew, Spectacled Eider, Pigeon Guillemot, Horned Puffin, Harlequin Duck, Common Murre, Arctic Tern, Snow Goose, Ruddy Turnstone, Snow Bunting, Dublin, Long-tailed Duck and Red Breasted Merganser.
     
  17. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Here is a list of the species I noted in my last update, which are currently or not kept in European zoos:

    Indian Aviary
    Spot-billed Pelican: 9 zoos (1 German, 4 Czech, 2 French, 1 Polish, 1 Spanish and 1 British)
    Western Reef Heron: 2 German ( Ortenburg-Irgenöd Vogelpark and Timmendorfer Strand Vogelpark Neindorf)
    Brown Headed Gull: None
    Grey Heron: 71 collections
    Red-Wattled Lapwing: 1 German (Bobenheim-Roxheim Vogelpark)

    Sea-Eagle Aviary:
    Steller's Sea Eagle: 81 collections

    Arctic Aviary:

    Smew: 70 collections
    Spectacled Eider: 8 collections (4 German, 1 French, 1 Swiss and 2 British
    Pigeon Guillemot: None
    Horned Puffin: None
    Harlequin Duck: 7 collections ( 4 German, 1 Czech and 2 British)
    Common Murre: 6 collections ( 1 German, 1 Danish, 1 Dutch, 1 Portuguese and 2 British)
    Arctic Tern: 2 collections ( Tierpark Hagenbeck in Hamburg, Germany and Tierpark Dählhölzli in Bern, Switerzland.
    Snow Goose: 38 collections
    Ruddy Turnstone: 3 collections ( Zoologischer Garten in Berlin, Germany, Vogelpark Villars les Dombes in France and 1 in Spain but I’m too lazy to type the full name :p
    Snow Bunting: None
    Dunlin: 2 collections ( One each of Austria and Spain hold this species but they have long names :p :p
    Long-tailed Duck: 4 collections ( 2 German and 2 British)
    Red-breasted Merganser: 3 collections ( 2 German (Zoologischer Garten Köln and Rostock Zoo) and 1 Czech (Praha Zoo))

    All information as of 5th January 2019 on Zootierliste.

    Next part is coming soon.
     
  18. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for the long delay, as I was too busy doing my research on ocean and coastal birds.
    Here we go:
    Visitors then move on, stopped by an confusing aviary; as it looks like a lake on a mountain, but once visitors look closer, they will realise that it is a coast, complete with the sea, the beach and the cliffs with grass on top of it. This mimics the coast of the North Pacific, where the species living here are found in the wild. The sea part will have sand and several plants imported from the Pacific Ocean, as the Scottish weather is perfect for these plants. The beach area will be sandy at the front, before slowly transforming into pebbles and large rocks. The cliff area will be 20 feet tall, with several slopes to enable these birds to climb the cliff. The species residing here are Tufted puffin, Black oystercatcher and Rhinoceros auklet. The cliff's slopes will be less steeper than usual in the wild and the slopes will be of a large surface area, as the auklets are poor fliers and usually take off from nesting sites and slight inclines. During feeding time, keepers will enter the enclosure and toss fish and squids into the water to simulate the puffins and auklets diving skills. The oystercatchers will be fed a variety of marine invertebrates ranging from mussels, limpets, crabs and isopods, but the keeper will hide them to enrich them. Nearby is a circular room for aviaries dedicated for gull species, each for a single gull species. Each aviary will be of the same design, with more water area than the land's. Each water areas will have a few rock Islands dotted around. Of course, there will be some trees to provide perching opportunities. The floor will be a beach area at the front and grassy at the back. The gulls will have their own aviary; Black-headed gull, Herring gull, Slender-billed gull, Sooty gull (which are the only ones in Europe), Red Sea Black-headed gull, African grey-headed gull, Audouian gull, Black-tailed gull, Caspian gull, Great black-billed gull, Grey gull, Lesser black-billed gull, Mediterranean gull, Mew gull, Black-legged kittiwake, Palla's gull, Red-legged kittiwake, Yellow-legged gull. These two aviaries concepts increases our zoo's number of species to 48 species now already!
     
  19. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    Could you guys please give me a review/feedback each design, and suggest to me what areas I should focus on and suggest species for me. That way it is more interactive and more easy for you to translate your mind into the zoo! But don't suggest RARE SPECIES to find in zoos. You can but limit yourself. That way, when you suggest an area and I’ll do a research and post my design. And if you suggest a species, I will do a research on the bird's natural behaviours, habitats, diets, ways to enrich them and the husbandries for the species. Hope this thread will become fun!
     
  20. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    An elevated platform leads you up to a corridor with 4 aviaries, one on one side and three on the other. In the detached aviary is a replica of Bass Rock, which is located in the coast of Scotland and boasts the world's largest population of Northern Gannet (we have the largest colony in captivity). The enclosure is very spacious (6,500 sq ft). Atlantic Puffin and European Shag also reside here. Keepers can access the Bass Rock via boat, and also use several boats to feed the birds by tossing fish in the water to enrich the birds. Visitors will see signage showing why this peculiar rock island is critical for the gannets' survival and why they choose to live here. Behaviour will be explained aswell. Across the corridor is an aviary for Great Skua which will be spacious, with rocky islands and several grassy areas. The beach area will be a mixture of pebbles and sand. The skuas will be fed fish and carcasses to mimic their scavenging lifestyle. However during breeding time, keepers will feed the birds via an platform above the viewing panels, as skuas can be aggressive of their hatchlings. Next is a Peruvian coast aviary with Guanay Comorant, Marbled Godwit and Yellow-billed Pintail. The beach area will be rocky with many large rocks. The back will consist of grass and trees. The concept of a Peruvian coast aviary is somehow rare to see in zoos. Signage will show how important this region is to the world. The cormorants and godwits will be the only ones of their kind in European captivity. We are proud of this fact as the cormorants are a hit with the bird team. The last aviary before the visitors return to ground level is a Chilean themed one. Species are Blackish Oystercatcher, Crested Duck, Fuegian Steamer Duck, Kelp Goose, Southern Lapwing, Two-banded Plover and Rock Comorant. This aviary will make you feel like you just beamed to Chile the Star Trek way. There will be several cliffs, sandy areas, rocky islands, grassy areas and deep water areas. (I made this joke, as someone from Fife once looked across the Firth of Forth and thought Edinburgh was Argentina :p). Anyways that's all, sorry for the poor pacing.