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Exhibit Design Competition

Discussion in 'Fantasy Zoos' started by nicholas, 2 Jul 2016.

  1. nicholas

    nicholas Well-Known Member

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    Most zoos have some very common species, e.g meerkat or petting zoo animals. In this competition your challenge is to create an innovative exhibit for a species that usually doesn't make a zoochatters heart skip a beat. Describe the exhibit as detailed as possible, landscaping, plant type or species as well as substrate etc. The species you are making new exhibits for are:

    Meerkat
    Ringtailed lemur
    Domestic rabbit OR guinea pig.

    Next Saturday I will comment all entries. Good luck!
     
  2. Rsaltmarsh

    Rsaltmarsh Member

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    So we have to create an exhibit for all of these species or just one?
     
  3. nicholas

    nicholas Well-Known Member

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    No one has to do anything. My thoughts were just that it would be interesting to see what the smart people here would come up with. Pick one or make exhibits for all the species.
     
  4. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    The meerkats enclosure would be very spacious, with red sand and some grass patches scattered about the enclosure. A fallen tree sits in the middle. Replicas of termite mound dot the enclosure. A pond sits at the front. A cave provides shade from the heat. When it's cold, the meerkats are gathered in the cave where a heat lamp will turn on.

    The lemur's enclosure would be bare at the bottom with sand and stone mixture. A water hole sits in the middle, for these lemurs which prefer the ground than being on the trees. In case if the lemurs want to be on the trees, few bare trees with ropes dot the enclosure. A cave and a hole in the clay wall also provide shade and heat.

    The rabbit enclosure, of course, will have grass and hay substance, with some logs to hide in and to practise their jumping skill. A wooden den sits in the back, to provide our hopping friends shade and heat. Few trees with holes under them dot the enclosure. A small section sticks out, so visitors can pet the rabbits. Visitors can also give them food from a nearby machine.
     
  5. Nikola Chavkosk

    Nikola Chavkosk Well-Known Member

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    Enclosure for ring-tailed lemur:

    Because these animals are not big, and space is limited resource, I would design rational multi-part enclosure:

    -Three outdoor neighborring enclosures, measuring 5x10 m (so 50 m2 each of the three), with heigh 4 m. They will be fenced and roofed with wire fence, plus fenced with glass/plastic pannels from sites for viewing from visitors (reducing noice level, preventing of direct contact intercation of visitors with the lemurs). Because animal needs are in first place. This mean that outer fence of all enclosures will be double-fenced. For maximum of about 10 ring-tailed lemurs. Each of them would be little bit different, and lemurs would normaly spend a day just in one, and the next day in the next enclosure and so one. That would allow adding new ithems/hidding of food ithems in the enclosures, encouraging lemurs to search for food.

    -One indoor enclosure, measuring 6x5 m (total 30 m2, of wich 24m2 for the lemurs, other 6m2 for stuff), with heigh 4 m. The indoor enclosure will be divided into 3 portions (2x4 m), primarly as indoor separation of group members. It will be made of concrete and plastic pannels/glass - sheated with wire fence, with partialy openable roof for allowing direct sun to reach to the animals and to the floor. The visitors will see lemurs indoor, from the outside trough glass. Floor will be from soil and spots with sand. Soil can make people and animals happy (research says, when there is topical contact of soil with the skin). There will be planted trees also in the indoor enclosures, and grass. It will be decored with natural materials like branches (also climbing material). Heating sorces would include solar pannels, glass-garden effect, electric devices, gas (and maybe some more inovative choices in future).

    -Outdoor enclosures will have living growing trees, grass, soil/sand floor, with small clay pools. It is best trees to be from one or two species, because that leave more naturalistic-immpression than trees/plants from multiple species and colours mixed in small space. Uniformity of forest - wich is also more natural case. The species of trees would be wild olive or several other species, including Tilia spp.; there are plenty of beautifull, non-toxic, short-growing, realtively big trees for wich I don't know the name, but can discover in a deeper reseaarch on net. Pseudoacacia robinia, almond tree, and Quercus trojana are very beautifull but unfotunately toxic. Arbutus andrachne is highly attractive, ever-green, tree with colour of its bark (or stem) resembling human skin colour (type on google), it should be easy to care for, but it's not resistant to temperatures under -10 deg C, aproximately (for more than 12 hours exposition) (it's native to Mediteranean).

    -There will be one tunnel-enclosure, completely covered with wire mesh (let say 60 m long, 1-3 m wide), for periodical walk of different animals (like for smaller non-human primates only), interconected with several enclosures. Such walk-running would be very exciting and stimulatory for the animals.

    -Nothing spectacular, but I always choose as much as naturalistic as possible, option, and also I choose cheaper option (with minimal amount of concrete).
     
    Last edited: 13 Jul 2016
  6. nicholas

    nicholas Well-Known Member

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    This sounds like a very attractive exhibit. I do wonder though, how you plan to make the meerkats visible to the visitors. In a spacious enclosure, small brown animals can be tricky to see, and you need to come up with a plan and how the enclosure is designed to make them visible, or explain how you will tackle the problem.

    This doesn't sound very interesting, I'm sorry to say. I like the sand and stone mix, from an aesthetic point of view, and a clay wall, if designed well, can be pretty attractive. Otherwise I fail to see how this enclosure is innovative in any way.



    Sounds attractive enough, but unless you plan to house a very small number of rabbits, the grass will probably be gone quite soon. Can you explain how the section sticks out, and how it enables people to per the rabbits?