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Exhibit Designing Competition #2

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by fkalltheway, 4 Aug 2010.

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  1. fkalltheway

    fkalltheway Well-Known Member

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    Thanks RedPanda, I really like that exhibit at the Bronx Zoo and I had fun redesigning it.

    For my challenge you must design an area of a zoo based around Asian Cats. The catch is that your exhibit area can only have two species of cats so choose wisely.

    Rules:
    --Must include 2 species of cats as well as one species of bear
    --May only include 2 species of cats, which must be from Asia
    --Maximum of 10 mammal species (besides the cats and bear), 20 bird species, 20 reptiles/amphibian species, 5 invertebrate species, and 8 fish species
    --Minimum of 5 mixed species exhibits, two with at least 3 different species
    --The mixed species exhibits of 3 or more species can contain only 1 species of bird.
    --Must use species which are held in captivity (with the cats they do not have to be held in captivity)
    --There is no limit on the size of exhibits.

    Deadline: Friday, August 6th at 10 PM EST.
     
    Last edited: 4 Aug 2010
  2. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

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    Must the other mammals also be from Asia?
     
  3. fkalltheway

    fkalltheway Well-Known Member

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    That's up to you, however the two cat species that you choose must be found in Asia.
     
  4. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

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    OK, thanks for helping... :)
     
  5. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

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    This is my entry. The whole exhibit complex is called ‘’Wild cats of Asia’’. The visitors are entering this exhibit through a pair of doors and they suddenly find themselves in a tropical house. Here lives free-flying Large flying foxes (3.3) and Sumatran trogons (1.2) and on the ground lives lesser mouse deer (1.1). There are also lots of tropical plants in this house. In the middle of the house there’s also a small lake with Giant gouramis (0.0.6). The trip continues, with the visitors passing through a new pair of doors to see that they are next to a big netted exhibit. Here lives a pair of clouded leopards (1.1) in their big exhibit. The visitors can view the exhibit in two floors. In the upper floor, the visitors can see the leopards in the trees, and also try to find some of the Crimson marsh gliders (0.0.27) that are flying here. In the bottom floor, the visitors can see the leopards on the ground, and on the bottom, the visitors see the animals through glass windows. The next exhibit is the smaller aviary. Here lives Bali starlings (1.2) and White-eared pheasants (1.1) . Following the path, the visitors come to the gibbon island. Here live Bornean gibbons (1.1) together with a small group of Oriental small-clawed otters (2.2). Both species can be seen indoors as well, and outside the otters have the whole water moat around the exhibit. The next exhibit is an indoor exhibit with free-ranging Prevost’s squirrels (1.1), Nicobar pigeons (2.3) and Indian fat-tailed geckos (0.0.5) . This exhibit is located in a small house, where there’s also a small exhibition about Asian wildlife and a small exhibit for Asian arowanas (0.0.3) and the exhibition is very educational for the kids. The next exhibit is the huge exhibit for a pair of Sumatran tigers (1.1). They have two exhibits, one big and one smaller off-show exhibit. The exhibit is netted, and filled with lots of tropical plants. The visitors see the tiger behind big glass windows, and you come very close to the tigers. Next to the tigers, there’s also a big exhibit for a pair of Malayan tapirs (1.1) , where they have a big water moat to swim in on hot days. They can also be seen indoors in their stables. Following these exhibits are some smaller terrariums for Water monitors (1.0) and reticulated pythons (0.1). The next exhibit is the mountain for Sun bears (1.2). This exhibit is shaped like a smaller mountain, with lots of high trees for the bears to climb in, and a water moat for hot days. Next exhibit is the huge netted exhibit for Great hornbills (1.1) , who lives in the trees of the exhibit, and the Malayan box turtles (0.0.12) , who lives in the smaller lake in the bottom of the exhibit. The last part of this section is the big exhibition house with info on the tigers, where both kids and adults can learn a lot about the various tiger species in the world.

    I think everything is right. Tell me if something's wrong.

    Cat species: 2 - Sumatran tiger, Clouded leopard

    Bear species: 1 - Sun bear

    Mammal species: 6 - Large flying fox, Lesser mouse deer, Bornean gibbon, Oriental small-clawed otter, Prevost's squirrel, Malayan tapir

    Bird species: 5 - Sumatran trogon, Bali starling, white-eared pheasant, Nicobar pigeon, Great hornbill

    Reptile species: 4 - Indian fat-tailed gecko, Water monitor, Reticulated python, Malayan box turtle

    Fish species: 2 - Asian arowana, Giant gourami

    Invertebrate species: 1 - Crimson marsh glider

    Mixed exhibits: 5
    1: Large flying fox, Sumatran trogon, Lesser mouse-deer, Giant gourami
    2: Bali starling, White-eared pheasant
    3: Bornean gibbon, Oriental small-clawed otter
    4: Prevost's squirrel, Nicobar pigeon, Indian fat-tailed gecko
    5: Malayan box turtle, Great hornbill
     
    Last edited: 6 Aug 2010
  6. fkalltheway

    fkalltheway Well-Known Member

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    Yup Swedish Zoo Fan, your entry follows all of my rules.
     
  7. siamang27

    siamang27 Well-Known Member

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    Leopards of Asia

    For this exhibit I decided to split it up into 2 areas. Each of these areas highlights one species of cat. The first of these areas is the Himalayas. The visitor path is actually a very long hill, which gets more and more steep as the exhibits continue. The first exhibit here are 2 aviaries, one for Golden Pheasant and Alexandrine Parakeet and the other for Chukar and Himalayan Bulbul. Both are well planted but not too dense, with the second aviary being more rocky. Now you arrive at the start of the hill. Every exhibit in this section from here is viewed from this hill. The first exhibit is a mixed species one for Red Panda, Red-crowned Crane and Himalayan Tahr. It has many tall trees for the pandas as well as more open areas. Nearby is a similar mixed exhibit, this one for Common Langur and Markhor. This one has just as many trees but also has rocky slopes for the Markhor to climb. It is viewed from 2 different areas. One is towards the more rocky end of the enclosure and the other is in the more heavily forested area. You are now at the top of the hill, and come to the final exhibit, for Snow Leopards. It is at least an acre in size, very hilly and rocky but also with several trees, however not enough planting so it doesn't look like a forest enclosure. It is viewed from 2 different areas. One of these is through oneway glass and the other is open viewing. After looking at the Snow Leopard exhibit you leave the Himalayas by going down another hill, this one shorter and not very steep, and come to the second, more lushly planted area: Southeast Asian Forest. The exhibits here are all much more heavily planted than the previous ones and many have multiple viewing opportunities. The first is a mixed species exhibit. It houses Malayan Tapir, Binturong, and Banded Langur, with many tall trees and lots of thick foliage, as well as a large pool for the tapirs to swim in. Next is a similar enclosure, but for a different mix of animals: Oriental Small-clawed Otter, Prevost's Squirrel, Siamang, and Rhinoceros Hornbill. Again, this exhibit contains a large pool for the otters. The second exhibit is also netted, but the first one is not. The second also has a small glass underwater viewing section into the otter pool. Both of these exhibits also have several off-exhibit enclosures for separating any of the species if needed. Passing these enclosures, you come to an aviary, much larger than the 2 Himalayan ones. The aviary houses: Great Argus, Black-naped Fruit-dove, Yellow-breasted Fruit-dove, Green Imperial-pigeon, Blue-crowned Hanging-parrot, Dollarbird, Golden-whiskered Barbet, Fairy Bluebird, Long-tailed Broadbill, White-rumped Shama, Straw-headed Bulbul, Chesnut-tailed Minla, Silver-eared Mesia and Scissor-billed Starling. There is also a small pond in the aviary for box turtles and fish.
    After the aviary you come to a very large exhibit for a pair of Sun Bears. It is mostly land, but does have a small pond and waterfall as well. The terrain in the enclosure is varied, with hills, rocks, flat areas, etc. Food is often hidden all throughout the enclosure by a keeper to encourage foraging behavior. The last exhibit in this area is a netted one for Clouded Leopard. Again, this is very large, but much more lush compared to the Snow Leopard exhibit. Last you enter a room with information about leopards and other Asian animals, and the habitats featured, plus a tank for a Reticulated Python.

    I hope this met all the rules, I did it in a hurry!
     
    Last edited: 5 Aug 2010
  8. Dibatag

    Dibatag Well-Known Member

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    Ghosts of the Himalayas

    This area of the zoo showcases the wildlife of the Himalayas. It is set on a rocky hillside with a bamboo, rhododendron and pine forest growing at the base. The further up the slope you ascend the sparser the planting and the rockier the terrain becomes. It is almost entirely outdoor with a few rocky viewing areas and information centers built into the hill.

    You enter the complex and go straight into the forest of the foothills. The first enclosure you come across is home to a troop of Assamese Macaques (4.8+offspring). It has a dry moat concealed with planting. The main area of the enclosure is planted with rhododendrons and bamboo interspersed with tall pine trees. All of these plants are poisonous or unpalatable to the monkeys so thy should last. The perimeter fence is designed to look like very dense bamboo. continuing along the base of the hill you come across a large steel pole and mesh aviary. This is home to a pair of Red Panda(1.1), Indian Muntjac(1.1) and Cheer Pheasant(1.2). Once again there is lots of bamboo and flowering rhododendron. There are multiple glass viewing panels to facilitate photography and viewing. There is one large pine tree in the exhibit that has many open areas where the pandas often rest. You can get a closer look at this by climbing up to a treehouse that looks inside the exhibit with a totally unobstructed view. Inside the treehouse there are panels detailing the conservation of the Red Panda and its habitat. Still at the base you will find four planted mesh exhibits for Yellow-Throated Marten(1.1) and Masked Palm Civet(1.1). The enclosures can be connected at different times of the year to facilitate breeding.You now begin up the hill and the rhododendrons and bamboo give way to a more open pine forest with rocky outcrops and cliffs. You enter a walkthrough aviary hugging a cliff. It is home to Impeyan Monal(1.2), Blyth’s Trogopan(1.2), Blood Pheasant(2.4), Wall Creeper(5.5), Eurasian Nutcracker(2.2) and Alpine Cough(3.3). Next you exit the aviary and make a switchback that take you to the top of the cliff. On your right there is an exhibit with similar planting as the aviary and it is separated from the public on one side by a stream, one by a cliff and the other by a dry moat. This exhibit is home to Himalayan Brown Bears(1.1). There is also a pool for the bears to swim in. From your current position you can look up the hill and see a number of animals traversing the rocky slope and grazing in the vegetated areas. Just past the bear is a similar exhibit that is home to a group of Mishmi Takins(2.5) and a flock of Himalayan Snowcocks(5.5). Here there is another viewing shelter with graphics on the bears and takins. There is also a large aquatic display modeled after a mountain stream. It is home to Barilius sp., Garra sp. and Devario sp. It is decorated with well worn boulders, pebbles and sparsely planted with moss. There are a few emergent plants growing from the top. You make another switchback and get some top views of the bear and takin exhibits before you pass behind a rock wall and in front of a mixed exhibit that is home to Himalayan Tahr(2.4),Himalayan Goral(1.2), Black-Necked Cranes(1.1) and Manul(1.1). The enclosure is set up with a sunken in front of the viewing area that is designed to contain the cats. As they are poor climbers and jumpers the depression need not be deep and can remain accessible to the other inhabitants. There are numerous refuge areas and a viewable underground den for the cats if they feel threatened by the other animals. Behind the depression there is a rocky meadow with wild flowers and sedges around a shallow pond. You can go up the hill a bit more and get a good view of the meadows and get a better look at the gorals while they scale the rocky outcrops that dot the enclosure. After leaving the meadow viewing area you will encounter a very large and tall aviary set against a tall cliff. It is home to Himalayan Griffon Vultures(2.2), Cinerious Vultures(1.1) and Lammergeier(1.1). There are many ledges and crevices in the cliff for perching and nesting. On the nesting ledges small cameras have been installed so that you can watch the chicks developing in the nest. At the bottom you will find a replica yak carcass that food and bones are hidden in for the birds to pick at. From here the birds have a view of the meadow, bear, takin and forest exhibits. On the second to last switchback there is a rocky scree slope with a small pool and meadow at the bottom. This is home to Markor(2.3), Bharal(3.5), Demoiselle Crane(1.1) and Bar-Headed Geese(2.2). On the shortest and final stretch of path is the home of the Snow Leopards(1.1+offspring). The cats have an area similar to the goat exhibit below. They also have clear views of all the exhibits before. Here is the largest visitor shelter. It gives close up views of the cats as well as information on the work being done in Bhutan to protect the native wildlife of the Himalayas.

    There is now a small gift shop and cafe selling handicrafts produced by villagers in Bhutan and Nepalese food such as momos(small meat or vegetable filled Dumplings) and parathas(bread similar to naan stuffed with various ingredients). The public now have a few choices, they can go on to visit the area of the zoo on the other side of the hill, go back the way they came to get a better look or board a sky-tram ride that takes you over to another area of the zoo, but also affords great birds eye views of the entire “Ghost of the Himalayas” complex.
     
    Last edited: 5 Aug 2010
  9. Javan Rhino

    Javan Rhino Well-Known Member

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    If I have two mixed exhibit species of 3 or more animals (with only one bird) already, can I have a mixed aviary with bird several species in it? If so, I am looking at this structure and wanted to check it followed rules:

    1. Mixed Exhibit with three species. 2 mammal, 1 bird.
    2. Mixed Exhibit with three species. 2 mammal, 1 bird.
    3. Mixed aviary. 4 bird
    4. Mixed aviary. ? bird
    5. ?
     
  10. fkalltheway

    fkalltheway Well-Known Member

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    @ Simang27: You didn't include a bear species in your entry

    @ Javan Rhino: As long as you have the two mixed-species exhibits with 3 species, only 1 being a bird, you can do whatever you want with the rest of the mixed exhibits. The set-up you listed is perfectly fine.
     
  11. Javan Rhino

    Javan Rhino Well-Known Member

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    Cool. I just realised I got the set-up wrong when I listed. Both that I am using for the 3 or more tasks are all three mammals. Is this still alright?
     
  12. fkalltheway

    fkalltheway Well-Known Member

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    Yup, that works too. Basically I put the rule in place to prevent people from using aviaries as their only mixed-species exhibits. Two mixed-species exhibits using 3 species of mammals works just fine.
     
  13. Javan Rhino

    Javan Rhino Well-Known Member

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    Right, here is my attempt at a Chinese/Japanese area for this cat challenge. I hope it all complies to the rules, if there is anything wrong just make a quick mention and I'll try to tweak it to fit :).

    Oriental Gardens

    The visitor enters the Oriental Gardens via a gravel pathway that leads under a series of bamboo arches, with many oriental grasses and plants growing on either side. Soon, the visitor appears at a small clearing (still surrounded by the amazing amount of foliage). In this main section of the actual garden there are several potted-plants, a water feature, several chinese dragon statues and a statue of Buddah meditating beneath a large, elegant archway. There are also three-four benches surrounding a large pond filled with Koi Carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    As the visitor moves further into the gardens, they will see a medium sized enclosure to their left for 2.4 Asian Small-clawed Otter (Aonyx cinerea). As they move alongside the glass-viewing for the otters (including a small portion of underwater viewing), the visitor crosses a small stream via a small, wooden bridge. This stream connects the main otter enclosure to a smaller enclosure on the right-hand side of the footpath. The secondary enclosure is usually opened out (thus making one large enclosure), however there are gates in place to seperate the enclosures, allowing for isolation, quarentine and breeding (keeping mum and pups seperate). Indoor accomodation for the otters are small, off-show huts that are lined with straw/hay for bedding. There are several large boudlers and branches to allow the otters different levels of elevation, there is a large, natural pool and streams for swimming (the otters are sometimes fed with lure bouys (disguised to look like rocks or plants). This makes the otters work to get the fish/shellfish out of the netting whilst underwater. Shellfish are also scattered on the bed of the pool and occasionally ‘buried’ under mudpiles so the otters must locate them. There are also many loose pebbles to for the otters to play with, use to open shellfish. The exhibir is altogther well planted with reeds and grasses, and there are several hollow logs where the otters can hide away.

    Further along the path, the visitor arrives at the Chinese Wetland Aviary (which they will see to their left just below and opposite the next aviary). This large aviary features a large pond in the centre, and is heavily planted with reeds and grasses. Species in the aviary are 1.1 Chinese Pond Heron (Ardeola bacchus), 2.2 Chinese Egret (Egretta eulophotes), 3.3 Whooper Swan (Cygnus cygnus) and 3.3 Mandarin Duck (Aix galerriculata). Located in the centre of the pond are two small islands that can be used by the birds to ‘hunt’ fish that are scattered into the water. Within the aviary are several sites where the birds can build nests and there are small floating rafts in the pond. For visitors there is also a hide to observe the birds at closer range.

    On the opposite side of the path (and slightly higher situated) is a slightly smaller aviary (Chinese Gamebird Aviary). This has many plants and trees, as well as a rocky wall running up the back of it. This wall has several holes at different levels that lead into the indoor shed behind. This shed is split into two halves by a wooden board; one half has a viewing window whilst the other is off-show. The aviary itself also has several rocks and shrubs that can be used for hiding etc. This aviary holds 1.1 Chinese Bamboo Partridge (Bambusicola thoracicus), 1.2 Cabot’s Tragopan (Tragopan caboti), 1.1 Chinese Monal (Lophophorus lhuysii) and 2.2 Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus).

    Moving further on along the gravel path, the visitor arrives at the entrance to the Oriental Cat Breeding Facility. There are six enclosures within this facility, with two species having three enclosures each. The first enclosures are two large ones on either side of the path leading to the entrance, with the left-hand enclosure stretching into a small area of woodland. There are also raised platforms for rest etc, as well as areas of long grass for privacy. The only viewing available here is the glass window that runs along one side of the enclosure, with the rest of it hidden behind the gardens. Although each species of cat rotate between their two main enclosures, this is usually home to 0.2 South China Tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis). On the other side of the path is a similar sized exhibit for 1.1 of the tigers (this is the main ‘breeding enclosure’). This exhibit is planted with tall oriental grasses and has many boulders, trees and elevated platforms for the tigers, as well as a variety of enrichment devices. It also includes a small pool. Otherwise, both exhibits are similar. Both enclosures have on-show indoor areas as well as off-show dens. There is also an off-show exhibit for the tigers that can be used for quarentine, seperation and a mother with cubs. Inside the facility is indoor viewing for the tigers, as well as several interactive displays and information boards.

    Going through into the next room, the visitor comes across the indoor enclosures for 2.2 Asian Golden Cat (Pardofelis temminckii). These are kept in two 1.1 pairs, and there is also an off-show exhibit for the same purposes as the S.C Tiger off-show exhibit. The exhibits here are quite lush with plants and trees, otherwise they are similar to the tiger exhibits (though a little smaller).

    After leaving the facility via the exit, the visitor is put on a fresh path that leads past two paddocks (one on each side of the path). The northern paddock is a large Chinese Woodland, and houses 2.3 Golden Snub-nosed Monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana), 4.4 Reeve’s Muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak), and 3.3 Pere David’s Deer (Elaphurus davidianus). There are plenty of trees within the enclosure (as well as several ‘open’ areas). Trees have ropes connecting them for the monkeys to climb around on, as well as ‘tree-houses’ and other climbing structures. This enclosure is netted to prevent monkeys escaping. They also have scatter feeds and feeder balls for enrichment. There are off-show stables for the deer and an off-show indoor enclosure for the monekys.

    The southern paddock is a Japanese Paddock, and is designed in a similar way. However, there is also a large rock pile for the animals to climb around on and a heated pool for 2.3 Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata). The other species in this paddock are 2.2 Japanese Serow (Capricornis crispus), and 3.4 Sika Deer (Cervus nippon).

    Continuing along the path is an aviary for 1.1 Red-crowned Crane (Grus japonensis) and 1.1 White-naped Crane (Grus vipio). This is heavily planted in a similar manner to the other enclosures.

    The next breeding facility in the Oriental Gardens is for 2.1 Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Each panda has its own enclosure, which is very heavily planted with bamboo and large rocks and poles for climbing. There are also elevated platforms and cubbing dens. A fourth enclosure is off-show for the usual reasons. The reason for the second male is to promote natural competition behaviour that [in theory] may encourage the males to breed with the female.

    Along the path leading back to the first part of the garden (koi pond) are enclosures for 1.1 Raccoon Dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides), 1.3 Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) and 4.8 Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica) (two enclosures). These enclosures are all of a good size and all allow for natural behaviour via enrichment devices.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    So, I think I have everything.

    2 cats: South China Tigers, Asian Golden Cats
    1 bear: Giant Panda
    Mixed Exhibit 1 (3 or more): Golden Snub-nosed Monkey, Reeve's Muntjac, Pere David's Deer
    Mixed Exhibit 2 (3 or more): Japanese Macaque, Japanese Serow, Sika Deer
    Mixed Exhibit 3: Chinese Pond Heron, Chinese Egret, Whooper Swan, Mandarin Duck
    Mixed Exhibit 4: Chinese Bamboo Partridge, Cabot's Tragopan, Chinese Monal, Golden Pheasant
    Mixed Exhibit 5: Red-crowned Crane, White-naped Crane
    Seperate Exhibits: Asian Small-clawed Otter, Koi Carp, Wild Boar, Japanese Quail, Raccoon Dog.

    Attatched Map Key:
    1. Oriental Garden
    2. Koi Pond
    3. Asian Small-clawed Otters
    4. Asian Small-clawed Otters
    5. Chinese Wetlands Aviary
    6. Chinese Wetlands Hide
    7. Chinese Game Aviary
    8. Chinese Game Aviary (indoors)
    9. South China Tigers
    10. South China Tigers
    11. Oriental Cat Breeding Facility (South China Tigers)
    12. South China Tigers (off-show)
    13. Oriental Cat Breeding Facility (Asian Golden Cat)
    14. Asian Golden Cat
    15. Asian Golden Cat
    16. Asian Golden Cat (off-show)
    17. Chinese Paddock
    18. Japanese Paddock
    19. Crane Aviary
    20. Giant Panda
    21. Giant Panda
    22. Giant Panda Breeding Facility
    23. Giant Panda (off-show)
    24. Japanese Quail
    25. Wild Boar
    26. Raccoon Dog
    27. Japanese Quail
     

    Attached Files:

  14. siamang27

    siamang27 Well-Known Member

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    Oops, forgot the bear species...added it in.
     
  15. Fossa dude

    Fossa dude Well-Known Member

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    Forest Gliders


    My exhibit will be presented in a zoo in Colorado. Since the climate in Colorado is so very cold it could not accomodate the Bornean animals that will live here. So the exhibit will take place into a newly constructed state of art indoor rainforest called Forest Gliders. The building is the largest indoor rainforest in the world complete with a scheduled rainfall and sometimes a thunderstorm. It will also feature a Ventilation System that will take in fresh air all the time and a giant Humidifier that moistens the air and will make the air around you more dense and humid.

    When you enter the giant glass bio dome you will see a signs above the doors that say's Forest Gliders, Borneo's Wild Island and on the sign is an outline of a boy on a zip line surrounded by thick jungle with snakes, lizards, and frogs gliding out from the jungle trees and plants. As you open the doors there will be volunteers giving visitors umbrellas that they can return in the exit lobby or take it home as a souvenier. As you walk in you are almost automatically greeted by a small zip line that will lead into the canopy of the Mullers Bornean Gibbon (1.1+2.0 offspring.) The island exhibit is formed in a sinkhole so when you get off the zip line you walk down a forest floor trail that will lead to a river dock viewing point and a large glass window where guest can see the Gibbons up close. The exhibit is well lighted by the sun so the glass was made in a pyramid shape so the trees can grow taller from the suns rays. As you walk along the forest floor trail it will lead you to a V shape path that will curiculate around a large jungle island for a pack of Sumatran Dholes (2.3+1.2 offspring.) The island has a rock with many small caves that take up most of the island. The island is also connected to a second exhibit split up into two sides. The Sumatran Dholes side is more open than the island, with grassland and a bamboo forest in the back. As you look down from a old creeky bridge into the exhibit you see a hunting party of Dholes stalking in the tall grass until they stop where a large stream flows into both exhibits. The stream turns into a mixed species exhibit for Bornean Rhinoceros (0.1+1.0 offspring), Bentang (1.4+0.2 offspring), and Water Monitor(1.0). Both exhibits are made for animal interaction through a secure hot wire fence. Since the Dholes have a perfect hunting view and the animals that are watched by the Dholes are their main prey the exhibit was made so they could get away from the Dholes. This is a quiet area where you can see them through a horse shoe shaped viewing area covered with an archway of tangling trees over you. In this nursery you can see the Water Monitor basking on the trees and vines above you, a Borneo Rhino with it's calf wading in the stream, and a herd of Bentang munching on the tall grass or lying in the shade of the tropical forest in the back of the exhibit. In the back of the exhibit is a socluded area for a male Bornean Rhino. The rhino's also take turns throughout the day so visitors can see all three of them. When you exit the viewing area the trail will lead you through a jungle of native bornean flora. As you are walking through you may here the trumpeted of a elephant, a grunt of a bear cub, or a call of a pheasent. The flora exhibit is home to the Rattan Palm, Milkweed, and Oil Palm. The trail leads you to a small patch of this destructive tree. This garden also features a documentary of how the oil palm is killing Borneo and it's amazing wildlife. Volunteers will be showing pictures and informing you about how you can check for palm oil in your daily life. Just to pull on those heart strings a little more the keepers will have a demonstration with many baby animals that have survived as their home was cut and burned, their mothers killed, and just have came out of a home as a pet or a food item at a bushmeat market. The animals that will be featured are not from the exhibit but is a program that the zoo started to show how animals are suffering in Borneo and how we need to stop that by not supporting palm oil and many other coffee brands and buy reusable palm oil and shade grown coffee. As you get closer to the next exhibits you start to smell a foul oder of rotting meat this is the world's largest plant the Rafflesia. As big as a four year old this plant draws in insects to a dreaded death so the exhibit isn't swarming with them. This smelly garden is also home to the punjent Durian Tree. When the Durian are ripe the keepers will harvest them for animal enrichment and a visitors snake if there willing to eat this rotten smelling fruit. As you exit the garden you will see a small rope fenced cage for the elusive Orchid Mantis(0.0.7.) The Mantis will camaflouge itself in the Epiphytic Orchid, Slipper Orchid, and Ground Orchid so it has an advantage over the helpless insects. This garden also is home to the Land Flanarian in a barriered crevice where you can see this preditor strangle earth worms. The next exhibit outside the orchid grove is many small averys each for a single species. The first is home to a small family of Sunda Cuckoo(1.1+0.0.2 offspring.) The second is home to the Little Green Pigeon(1.1.) As you finish looking at the two averys you will follow the path over a bridge and into a biulding especially designed for avian breeding. When you enter the circular building you see the whole lay out as you get in and out of the building, restroom and refreshment stand, and a video camera streaming to a T.V. so guests can see the newly borns first discover life. As you walk through the doors you see two open windowed exhibits on both sides of you. The left is for the White Crowned Shama(1.1+1.2 offspring)and Chestnut Napped Fortail(2.2+1.1 offspring.) the right is for Borneo Blue Flycatcher(5.5+3.1 offspring.) The last exhibit is made for flight. As you look into this exhibit from a glass wall you will see the White Fronted Falconet(1.1.) As you exit the exhibit you see two exhibits also on both sides of you for the Palawan Peacock Pheasent(2.2+4.2 offspring.) When you exit the Pheasentry the forest floor path takes you up a hill. At the top is a station where you can either zipline through the Canopy or ride a canoe through a lively Red Mangrove. If you take the Zipline through the canopy the first exhibit you will see is the largest exhibit in the indoor rainforest home to the Pied Imperial Pigeon(5.7) and Borneo Pygmy Elephant(0.14+1.3 offspring.) The zipline was made so that it went fast but is more straight so you can get a good look at a large stomping herd of Elephants. As you pass over and under vines and branches the zipline goes down 25 miles per hour then almost stop abruptly. As you slowly scout along you see a nesting sight for a Borneo Sun Bear(0.1+3.0 offspring.) The exhibit is formed so the zipline can see the bears in the trees and also just above reach for a protective mother bear. The zipline will end in front of the last exhibit in the indoor rainforest. The building will create what it feels like when you are in the Bornean Jungle at night. If you took the canoe the first exhibit you would see is another Borneo Pygmy Elephant but this time you are inside the exhibit with them. There is nothing that will keep them away that is if they choose to bother you. Since you are in the water you will most likely see them wallow in the mud on the banks or on the other side of you is a fenced exhibit for three male Borneo Pygmy Elephants. Two are fully mature and the fathers to the babies at this exhibit and the other is for a young male that will be used for an animal ambassador at the zoo. As you canoe you start to see a sudden change in scenery. The exhibit is surrouned by red mangrove. At first you don't see or hear anything but when you get closer to the prime viewing area you see so much that you can barely identify before you see anther. The first animal you see is the Borneo Mangrove Jack(0.0.25+ offspring.) The fish is luered up to the surface with a fish food for the guest to feed the giant fish. The next thing you see is the Giant Mudskipper(7.10+ offspring) lined up on the muddy bank or climbing up the mangrove trees. Then you see a swarm of Soldier Crabs(0.0.100)in the water, on land, and even clawing at you in the canoe. Once you get the crab off your shirt you see a frog swallow a helpless crab. As your mouth drops down in surprise you hear the canoe guide tell you that the crabs are enrichment for the Crab Eating Frog(10.8) and Crab Eating Macaque(3.6+2.2 offspring.) When the guide announced that there was a crab dinner party in the exhibit you start to see curious Crab Eating Macaques jumping all around the sides and top of you from tree to tree with mouthfuls of crab. When you get closer to the exit the crabs get smart and go to the water where you might think they are safe but then the macaques start diving into the stream for their crabs and maybe even a leaf shape Tripetail. As the Macaques lead you closer to the end of the mangrove you notice there is one more animal here to see. When you see the bloated long nosed dive into the water from the top of the trees the guide quickly announces that the Proboscis Monkey(2.5+0.3 offspring) are poached in large numbers and are killing off in a fast rate because of destruction of Borneo's Mangrove. When you exit the canoe and walk inside the Nocturnal Building you are given a pair of night vision goggles so the building does not have to disturb the animals with light. When you enter through the doors you are asked to be very quite and respectful because the animals that you are about to see are very endangered and have never been kept in captivity so they are being studied by the zoo's vets, keepers, and scientist. The first exhibit is made up into five parts. The first is looked down on by a elevated bridge for the Borneo Clouded Leopard(1.1) and the second is for the Borneo Bay Cat(0.1.) The main viewing exhibit is smaller than the two off ones and the interrupted exhibit. The next is for both of the cats on a time rotation so they can smell senses to keep them on there feet. As you go through the doors to the next exhibit you are asked to take them off because the next exhibit is lighted in some viewing parts. As you go through the doors onto the elevated path you automatically see Lantern Bugs (0.0.50) swarming around the small lights. As you pass through a netted fence you see a glimmering shadow of a Paradise Tree Snake(1.3) gliding from tree to tree. Once you pass through the next netted fence you may have a chance to see the Flying Dragon Lizard(1.0), Kuhl's Flying Gecko(2.2), and Borneo Flying Frog(3.4.) As you turn through the doors expecting to be over with your trip you find yourself surrounded by glowing Trilobite Beetles. As you follow the curvy glass exhibit full of glowing beetles you find the exit to the Borneo's Night Life Building. The exit lobby is a place where you can take about your journey through the largest indoor rainforest in the world, eat from the restaurant, go through your photos from the photo op, donate to Borneo's survival and get a printed out a certificate of Orang Saver, Learn more about palm oil, buy shade grown coffee, or sit and look at the Yellow Lipped Sea Krait(6.8) go in and out of the salty water in a tide pool type exhibit.

    Please tell me if I did anything wrong. I was in a hurry to finish it.
     
    Last edited: 7 Aug 2010
  16. Swedish Zoo Fan

    Swedish Zoo Fan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2007
    Posts:
    252
    Location:
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Isn't time up now? I'm in Sweden, and our time difference is maybe a little strange... :p
     
  17. fkalltheway

    fkalltheway Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    21 Mar 2009
    Posts:
    190
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
    The deadline is today (August 6th) at 10 PM Eastern Standard Time. I'm not sure how many hours ahead of EST you are but there's just a little less than 5 hours left until 10 PM EST.
     
  18. Fossa dude

    Fossa dude Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10 Jul 2010
    Posts:
    202
    Location:
    usa
    I hope nothing else is wrong because I just edited the spelling and grammar.
     
  19. fkalltheway

    fkalltheway Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    21 Mar 2009
    Posts:
    190
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
    Alright, time's up. Congrat's Javan Rhino on winning my challenge! I liked the idea of a breeding complex for the cats and using a Giant Panda was "outside of the box" for me. Nice job!
     
  20. Javan Rhino

    Javan Rhino Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    15 Jun 2010
    Posts:
    2,124
    Location:
    Cheshire
    Cool, glad you liked it :). So, here is the new challenge.

    The Last Resort

    Over the last few years, the numbers of Javan Rhinoceros' (Rhinoceros sondaicus) and Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) have decreased dramatically due to poaching and habitat destruction.
    The curator of a world-class zoological park has been involved with conservation efforts for one of these species (your choice) and has been given permission to capture wild specimens in the hopes of starting a captive breeding programme.
    With this being such a big event in terms of conservation, the curator has decided to make the species a focal point in the zoo and place it in a geographical zone. He asks you to design this zone and the enclosures to reflect the institutes reputation as world class. Here are the guidelines:

    1) You must choose one OR the other. Not both (and no preferance will be given depending upon species).
    2) If you choose the Rhino, all species must be from the Indonesian/South-East Asian rainforests. The area is to be called 'The Asian Forest Trail.'
    3) If you choose the Gorilla, all species must be from the African Rainforests. The area is to be called 'The Congo River Trail'
    4) For both species, you must have facilities to hold 2.3 of that species, including off-show areas and adequate seperation facilities.
    5) Regarding other species: Both choices state that you must have a min. 8 mammals, 10 birds, 5 reptiles/amphibians, 2 inverts and 1 fish. (not including the chosen species)
    9) Regarding both species: Both choices state that you can have a max. 15 mammals, 20 birds, 10 reptiles/amphibians, 5 inverts and 5 fish. (not including the chosen species)
    10) The exhibit must focus on endangered species, and therefore the zoo asks for the following amounts to be either 'Endangered' or 'Critically Endangered': 3 mammals, 2 birds, 1 reptile/amphibian/invert/fish. (Not including the chosen species). (You may have more with these listings).
    11) You must have interactive displays that educate about the problems facing your animals, namely hunting/poaching and habitat destruction.
    12) Animals do not have to be currently available in captivity.

    So, hopefully one you shall all enjoy :). I will set the deadline for 8pm British Time on Monday, 9 Aug. Any questions just ask.
     
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