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Exhibit Designing Competition #2

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by fkalltheway, 4 Aug 2010.

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  1. Dibatag

    Dibatag Well-Known Member

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    As there is only one reply I am going to extend the closing date until wednesday at the same time

    Keep designing!
     
  2. DesertRhino150

    DesertRhino150 Well-Known Member

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    The 'Asia in Danger' complex is four outdoor enclosures surrounding a large indoor dome made to resemble an Asian marketplace, with several enclosures branching off from the central square. Visitors first enter the indoor house, where they start by roaming in a temperature-controlled pristine rainforest, complete with live vegetation, pre-recorded bird and animal calls and even a small number of live invertebrates to truly complete the illusion. While visitors scan the vegetation for the aforementioned invertebrates (namely Oriental scarlet dragonflies, blue-spotted tiger beetle, common rose butterfly and owlet moth), they become aware of the sounds of chainsaws. As the wander down the trail, visitors find themselves confronted by a large cinematic screen with wooden seating, that plays a five-minute film about the threats of deforestation, and how it opens up the forest for humans to enter and cause havoc with the local wildlife.

    Following on from this are the four outdoor areas for some of the larger animals. One interesting fact about this complex is that, apart from the insects and fish, all came from several rescue centres dotted around Southeast Asia. The first outdoor enclosure houses a troop of ten Southern pig-tailed macaques. These animals, like all the species in the outdoor enclosure, have live vegetation for foraging purposes, with several sturdy fig trees and tougher vegetation such as bamboo, Japanese knotweed and rattan palms forming the basis for most of the vegetation in all the outdoor enclosures. The macaques, as well as having plenty of outdoor vegetation, also have a spacious and lushly planted indoor area, divided into three sections to allow the monkeys to avoid each other if they wish. One of the indoor areas overlooks the second indoor area, home to a pair of Malayan sun bears. Along both the indoor and outdoor viewing windows, there are large graphic boards showing the Asian wildlife trade. Underneath lift-panels there are images that show bears in bile cages and macaques being prepared for sale into the exotic pet trade. The bears indoor area has a bile cage nearby that enables visitors to experience what it would be like to be a bear living in the bile factories. Also there is a glass display case showing appliances used for removing the tips of the teeth of potentially dangerous animals being sold into the pet trade. Following on from this is the next exhibit, that has an open outdoor viewing area, and a spacious indoor environment. Centrepiece of this enclosure are five hog deer, all rescued from the wildlife trade, but unable to be released due to their attachment to humans. One of the bucks has a visible snare-mark around his neck, and as with all the animals, there are ambassadors nearby to ensure that no stress comes to the animals, and also to both answer visitor questions and tell visitors the stories of each of the animals. Visitors may notice this enclosure is netted over, because roosting in one of the fig trees visitors may well spot the male spotted wood owl, rescued from an illegal wildlife market in Thailand, and here he is awaiting a rescued female, to form a captive breeding programme. The final enclosure houses a pair of Owston's palm civets which are poached so their scent glands can fuel the medicine trade, and also for their meat. Information boards show the risk of SARS from eating civet meat, and also displays a map of all the Asian civet species, and how they are threatened accordingly by the wildlife trade.

    Having seen this, visitors leave the forest and enter the marketplace. This is an interesting combination of real shopping and information areas, with some stalls selling souveniers while others display fake animal products such as bottles containing 'bear bile' or tables of tiger bones that visitors can pick up and look at. An interesting section is a table that appears to be selling live insect larvae for sale, with several in small individual tanks. In fact, these are the larvae of dawn dropwing dragonflies, that rotate between the individual tanks and several spacious ponds to ensure that each of the larvae gets a chance to recuperate and develop further. Behind the buildings, there are several smaller enclosures housing other interesting species. The first is a spacious semi-arboreal habitat with viewing from both a longhouse over the water and an underwater viewing window. Living on the ground are blood pythons while green tree pythons perch on branches above, that are completely inaccessible by the larger snakes. Living in the pool is a shoal of Jullien's golden carp. Graphics show how wild snakes end up in the pet trade in the western world, how blood pythons are unsustainably harvested for the snakeskin trade and how the local fishing practices have almost wiped out the local fish populations. Then, the next enclosure can be found by the largest building in the dome, an authentic Asian restaurant. The menu has been adapted, to look like illegal products such as bear, civet and pangolin meat have been crossed from the menu, and while visitors eat, they can observe a range of animals interacting in a large mixed enclosure. Greater chevrotain, pygmy slow loris, red-billed blue magpie, greater yellownape woodpecker, long-tailed parakeet, violet cuckoo, white-headed bulbul and Asiatic softshell turtle all live together, making for a fascinating and informative display. An observation hide allows visitors to see the animals at the main pool, and a small underwater window means visitors can see the turtles as they forage among the aquatic plants. All along the pathway that passes through and then over this enclosure, there are information boards about the hunting of chevrotains, the massive trade in rare Asian turtles and the exotic pet trade that is affecting both the birds and the lorises. As mentioned earlier, at one stage the pathway enters the enclosure and becomes a walk-through aviary, where visitors can enjoy an extremely close encounter with some of the species. Following on from this is one of the most important enclosures dedicated to wildlife rescue, and the building that overlooks it has been aptly named 'The Pangolin Rescue Centre'. Within the centre there are smaller information boards about two of the species that inhabit this enclosure, while the main species, the Malayan pangolin, dominates both floors of the building, with information on their capture, trade and how the zoo coordinates a rescue and rehabilitation programme in nine Asian countires affected by the trade, along with traps and cages used to catch and transport these unique animals. Permanent residents in this enclosure are Vietnamese red giant flying squirrels and Blyth's giant frogs, the latter of which tend to be collected unsustainably for culinary use across Asia. Finally in the main enclosure, there are thirteen Malayan pangolins that rotate between the display enclosure and a series of off-display breeding enclosures. There is also a series of boards about each individual pangolin, with the ambassador regularly switching around the name tags for each individual that is on display. The final enclosure included around the market is home to a breeding pair of wrinkled hornbills and a lone female clouded monitor lizard, the latter of whom sadly lost a leg in a snare in her native Cambodia. Information boards state how hornbills across Asia are currently threatened by the bushmeat and pet trade, and also how the helmeted hornbill was almost hunted to extinction for 'hornbill ivory', with the hornbill ambassador holding a real example of a carved honbill ivory piece, and a fake helmeted hornbill skull for educational purposes.

    Having left the marketplace, visitors think they have completed their visit, but there is one extra enclosure to delight the visitors. The area is based upon a Filipino sea gypsy camp, with a nearby fishing boat stranded on a sandbar. Inside the sea gypsy buildings there is a series of ineractive images of how these people are sustainably using their resources, and show films of coral reefs, seahorses and coral farming. This was originally going to be a much larger part of the area, but spacial issues and overall costs meant that interactives and ambassadors had to be used over real animals. However, from the outdoor viewing area, and several underwater viewing windows within the camp, visitors can see a large sandy tank complete with three tiger sharks. These giant fish were sent over from aquariums in the US to help highlight the threats facing sharks worldwide. Having viewed the sharks both from above the water and from vieiwing windows, the visitors then enter an underwater tunnel that the sharks can pass over. Visitors then enter the hull of the storm-driven boat, where they learn about the threats to sharks from their finning for sharkfin soup and hunting for their jaws and teeth as souveniers. Glass containers hold confiscated jaws and teeth from over twenty shark species, there are images showing the finning process and a crate is show to contain tins that represent sharkfin soup. There is finally an interactive display showing how many sharks have to die to make a day's worth of sharkfin soup.

    The final area is a large culmination of the entire complex, with large posters lining the walls of the long corridor. On one side of the corridor, the posters show live animals, while opposite them the posters show the animals being exploited by some way. At the end of the corridor is a quote of Buddha, that states 'The forest is a peculiar organism of unlimited kindness and benevolence that makes no demands for its sustenance and extends generously the products of its life activity; it affords protection to all beings, even offering shade to the axe-man who destroys it' in order to get the visitors thinking as they enter the final room. This final areashows details about all the conservation projects the zoo is involved with, including sharks, Owston's civets, sun bears, macaques, pangolins and softshell turtles. There are then donation boxes, a large wall with expansion plans that hope to include future species such as tigers, orangutans, gibbons, small cats, other small carnivores, crocodiles and coral reef fish among other species and a live streaming webcam in the zoo's specially purposed conservation reserve in Cambodia, where endangered Asian wildlife is protected. Next to this webcam are a series of refresh webcams from elsewhere in the reserve, a daily sightings list and an internet database of the species found at the reserve, and any recent news on releases or rescues. A final centrpiece for this is a giant fig tree, where visitors can sit on benches under its shade and listen to conservation-themed talks every hour.

    Thanks for reading. Hope you enjoyed reading about this exhibit. Below is the species list, with latin names for the insect species.

    1:1 Malayan sun bear
    1:1 Owston's palm civet
    1:1 Pygmy slow loris
    4:6 Southern pig-tailed macaque
    1:1 Greater chevrotain
    2:3 Hog deer
    4:9 Malayan pangolin
    2:2 Vietnamese red giant flying squirrel
    1:0 Spotted wood owl
    1:1 Wrinkled hornbill
    1:1 Violet cuckoo
    1:1 Greater yellownape woodpecker
    1:1 Red-billed blue magpie
    3:3 White-headed bulbul
    1:3 Blood python
    1:1 Green tree python
    6:5 Asiatic soft-shelled turtle
    0:1 Clouded monitor lizard
    3:3 Blyth's giant frog
    2:1 Tiger shark
    6:9 Jullien's golden carp
    0:0:12 Common rose butterfly- Atrophaneura aristolochiae
    0:0:14 Owlet moth- Peridrome orbicularis
    0:0:15 Dawn dropwing dragonfly- Trithomis aurora
    0:0:6 Oriental scarlet dragonfly- Crocothemis servilia servilia
    4:4 Blue-spotted tiger beetle- Cicindela aurulenta
     
  3. Dibatag

    Dibatag Well-Known Member

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    I am happy to announce that the winner of this challenge is DesertRhino150! Your attention to detail was amazing and the exhibit was very conservation oriented. Well done to Pat as well! Both entries were impeccable.

    I am looking forward to the next challenge!
     
  4. DesertRhino150

    DesertRhino150 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you. I really enjoyed designing that exhibit.

    Your local zoo has decided to help conserve a stand of Atlantic rainforest in Brazil by purchasing and conserving a large wildlife reserve in the area. To raise awareness for this cause, the Brazilian government are sending your zoo 2:4 blonde capuchin monkeys as the first ever captive breeding programme. Now, your local zoo wants you to design a new complex housing not just the capuchins, but also a range of other endangered South American animals.

    • There has to be facilities for 2:4 blonde capuchin monkeys
    • Up to twenty-five other species can be housed here (max. 9 mammals, 10 birds, 5 reptiles/amphibians, 1 invertebrate/fish)
    • Up to five species can be chosen to be part of the captive breeding programme
    • Any region of South American can be used
    • Animals do not have to be held in captivity
    • There has to be suitable information indicating the zoo’s conservation and research programmes, as well as information about the wildlife reserve the zoo has purchased
    • Closing time for the competition is Saturday 8:00 p.m. in British time

    Enjoy. :) I look forward to seeing some great entries!
     
  5. Jesse

    Jesse Well-Known Member

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    Is this comp still open?
     
  6. Jesse

    Jesse Well-Known Member

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  7. DesertRhino150

    DesertRhino150 Well-Known Member

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    Not much time left now! If there are no new designs before 8:00pm, I can extend the time to allow for more entries.
     
  8. Fossa dude

    Fossa dude Well-Known Member

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    I'm half done with my exhibit but cannot finish today. I would appreciate more time.

    Thank you,

    Fossa dude :)
     
  9. DesertRhino150

    DesertRhino150 Well-Known Member

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    No problem! Closing time for the competition will now be 8:00 P.M tomorrow. Looking forward to seeing your design. :)
     
  10. Sealife357

    Sealife357 Well-Known Member

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    Jesse- What program did you use to make your map? Its very well done by the way.
     
  11. Fossa dude

    Fossa dude Well-Known Member

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    Thanxs so much DesertRhino150. I was very happy with this one.
     
  12. Fossa dude

    Fossa dude Well-Known Member

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    BASIN

    The Tampa Zoo has finally agreed to purchase a small section of an Amazon reserve for conservation purposes. Although the reserve is doing well, they have decided to help raise awareness to the other half of the reserve. Since the other half of the reserve was built for agricultural reasons, many of the animals will die when the forest is destroyed. There has also been a grant for some animals to be taken out before the forest is destroyed. These will be the residents to the new exhibit.


    The Florida Keys have been known for vacation, relaxation, and luxury but now one of those islands will undergo an amazing transformation. From shore line paradise to dense amazon rain forest. A large amount of soil, rocks, and plants that are native from the amazon will be isolated in a quarantine period before being placed. This will help any disease or introduction of more introduced species to the keys. After placement of the natural foliage, another period will take place for the growth of the new tropical island. This period will be watched closely and maintained so when the arrivals come it will be perfect for them, exhibits, and visitors. Before the endangered animals arrive, a barrier will be placed surrounding the island from any threat including many natural disasters. Since the barrier won't hold it for ever, a relocation drill will be performed from escape helicopters, bridges, and tunnels. The animals will be placed at the Tampa Zoo until there is a known safety or after rebuild.


    The island will be named BASIN. This is because a stream from the Amazon River runs right through it creating a basin. Basin's forest floor paths lead mainly to one exhibit with other branching paths along the main path. This will help so there is plenty of space for the animals and so that visitors cannot get confused on the paths.

    The opening path leads you to the front gate where tickets are sold and information presented. The main path will stop in the middle of the island where the Xingu Indian villages are placed. This area will be named Xingu for the Xingu tribal displays that are presented here. The village features 12 huts for all 12 tribes that live in the Xingu. Each hut contains information plaques and artifacts that make each tribe its own. Xingu is also the gift shop, rest room, and concessions area, which is good considering how all 6 paths lead back to the Xingu area. Each path will be named after six of the twelve tribes of the Xingu: Aweti, Kalapalo, Kamaiura, Kayapo, Kuikuro, and Matipu.

    The first path, Aweti, will start a change of 3 island exhibits. Aweti welcomes you to the first ever captive breeding program for 2.4 Blond Capuchins. This critically endangered species was rediscovered in 2006. Giving that, there is very little information on the species. Their exhibits are three islands each having an overhead artificial tree branch archway connecting to the islands in a triangle shape. There is no time rotation between the islands, so the monkeys go as they please. Trees around the exhibit are trimmed often so the monkeys cannot escape. Large lush exhibits don't just breed endangered animals, so every 30 minutes an enrichment item will go into each island and everyday it is something different such as: live enrichment, ( lizards, mice, fish ) coconuts, rocks, melons, mealworms, honey bee nest, ( without the bees )...........
    Each of these lush islands will connect to an exhibit location which will also connect to a large indoor area.

    The second path, Kalapalo will be the second island on the chain. This small island is home to a small group of Endangered Buffy Headed Marmoset. Although the zoo breeds them, they are not part of this particular Captive Breeding Program. The fence surrounding the island is rainforest stone built up with moss and vines scouring their way inside the nooks and crannies. The look of the island is quite different from many others. Coming out of the water are two large boulders protruding from two sides of the island. Each boulder gives a perfect sun bathing spot for the Marmosets as the sun changes its way. One of those boulders is hiding behind cattails and pampas grass, while the other is open for the visitors to see. Many holes and caves have been cut out for storing food and other enrichment items inside. The primates have two equally good options but are encouraged to come down from the tall trees or the other rock to look for their food out in the open were visitors can see. This exhibit was made to look a little more dryer than the others. Because there are so few of these primates, we wanted them to be seen easily. Many large trees are growing over the top of the back half to protect them from any arial predators.

    The third path, Kamaiura is the third island and last on the chain. Unlike the Marmosets exhibit, this endangered Pied Tamarin exhibit is packed full of dense vegetation because this group is so large and there is no other protection form arial predators. Since the exhibit was made to imitate their thick reserve, a pair of binoculars was set up for an easier look. These beautiful primates are almost always talked about as ugly, so the keepers are training a pair of young sisters to be animal ambassadors. Every day at different times, keepers will bring them out to small crowds and show how friendly and amazing this creatures really are. Two provide more conservation for this species, there will be an off location for a different group of Tamarins. The exhibit is located on the other side of the indoor building. Radio collars will be tested on them as well they will have absolutely no access to visitors, and the keepers will only have access when feeding and cleaning.

    The fourth path, Kayapo leads you to a building that is half indoors. A temperature controlled archway was place above the glass and netting fence. The archway also sprays a humid mist from small hoses attached to the panels on the glass roof. This exhibit is under a careful study for the critically endangered Superagui Lion Tamarin. The zoo has not yet put them on display, but they are part of the Captive Breeding Program. There are two visible levels to this exhibit. The first is elevated so you can see the whole exhibit from above. The second level is but hidden by a lush vegetation in the exhibit.

    The fifth path, Kuikuro is home to two very unknown species, one of which was discovered in 2008. This is the Araca Ukari and the other is the critically endangered Black Bearded Saki. The only way to view these animals is from a canoe looking above trying to get a glimpse of these species. Their netted swampy exhibit is the second largest on the island.

    The sixth and last path, Matipu is home to the largest exhibit. The exhibit is home to the last three Captive Breeding Program animals. There are two viewing areas that you access by and elevator. The top or canopy viewing areas is where you can get face to face with free ranging Yellow Tailed Woolly Monkeys. The bottom levels are where you can get a glimpse of a flock of Hoatzin and a pod of Pink River Dolphins. This exhibit was formed to look like a Amazon River basin mangrove.

    Many of these animals have never been held in captivity so viewing is limited and much knowledge is unknown.
     
  13. Jesse

    Jesse Well-Known Member

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    i'm glad you liked it, I just used microsoft publisher.
     
  14. DesertRhino150

    DesertRhino150 Well-Known Member

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    Well, having finally got two entries, and after much deliberation, I think the title should go to Fossadude! The collection of rare animals was really something, and the detail that has gone into designing the exhibit was something else that really deserved commendation. Congratulations to Jesse, I hope you continue to design some fantastic exhibits! :D

    Looking forward to the next challenge!
     
  15. Fossa dude

    Fossa dude Well-Known Member

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    Rebuilding A Lost Cause

    Thank you DesertRhino150. I really enjoyed designing an exhibit with my knowledge of Zoology and Anthropology.


    Here is your challenge. A run down zoo located in Hays, Kansas has asked for your help to repair one of their existing exhibits. Along with repairing, they have also asked you to build a second exhibit from scratch.



    - You may only choose one of these exhibits to rebuild:

    Feline House - Very outdated. Located in the middle of the zoo. There are two buildings with a small gap in between them. One barred and concrete floored cage on each side of each building. Your task with this exhibit is to take away all the cages and replace them with new bigger ones. Public indoor access to the feline building is optional. Must be accommodations for 1.1 African Leopard and 1.3 Bobcats. All exhibits must connect to the main two buildings. Limit of 2 more exhibits ( not counting the other 4 that are already there)

    Reptile House - Located in the entrance. You cannot add on to the existing building, but since there are only 1.1 Green Iguana, 1.2 Aldabra Tortoise, 0.1 Burmese Python, and 0.0.1 African Bull Frog you may add 8 more species of Reptile, Amphibian, or Insect. The listed animals have to be part of the exhibit. Only 2 outside exhibits can be made. You may also rebuild the inside of the house so the exhibits do not look like they were bought at a pet store.

    Aviary - A large marsh was used for a small number of waterfowl and flamingos but now they have all died and the zoo wants you to build a netted aviary for any species of bird around the world. Any species of animal may accompany the birds ( other animals can be no larger than a wolf ) . The aviary must have two levels one elevated and the other a board walk. The bottom level must stay mangrove looking but the top can be any other biome. Cages inside this aviary can be built. Must feature 10 species of birds along with 10 other species of any animal.


    -The exhibit you make may take up a large part of the zoo. Just remember it is a small zoo. Any species of animal can be put in your exhibit. Although it must feature at least 6 species.

    - All animals must be held in captivity.
    -The fundings are high so you can be as expensive as you want and very creative.
    -The deadline is 8:00 p.m. Friday MTZ. So you can have enough time putting in your entries.

    Good luck and have fun.
     
  16. KCZooFan

    KCZooFan Well-Known Member

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    On the aviary, can it ONLY be 10 bird species and 10 other species?
     
  17. Fossa dude

    Fossa dude Well-Known Member

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    @KCZooFan - Yes it can only feature 10 bird species but the others 10 species are optional. Sorry If I didn't make that clear.
     
  18. Fossa dude

    Fossa dude Well-Known Member

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    Time is ticking and there is only 1 more day to finish so if you are working on a design the time would be now. If there is not at least 3 designs by the end of the designated day, I will bump up the time to Sunday 8:00 p.m. Please let me know if you have any questions.

    Fossa dude
     
  19. Fossa dude

    Fossa dude Well-Known Member

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    The time is up so the competition will be extended to Sunday 8:00 p.m. MTZ. I hope this will bring in some designs.
     
  20. Sealife357

    Sealife357 Well-Known Member

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    Thats impresive. Well done.
     
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