Join our zoo community

field guides for Australian mammals

Discussion in 'TV, Movies, Books about Zoos & Wildlife' started by zooboy28, 29 Jun 2016.

  1. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    1 Aug 2010
    Posts:
    4,573
    Location:
    Melbourne, Aust (ex. NZ)
    Last edited by a moderator: 30 Jun 2016
  2. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    16,320
    Location:
    omnipresent
    it's the one above the Common Brushtail, although it has since been split into caninus and cunninghami.
     
  3. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    1 Aug 2010
    Posts:
    4,573
    Location:
    Melbourne, Aust (ex. NZ)
    Yeah, I see that (mountain brushtail possum). Which mammal guide do you have - I presume the 2nd edition (which I have) of Menkhorst and Knight? There is a third edition from 2010, any thoughts on whether that is much more useful? Are there any other useful guides (apart from Andrew's Finding Mammals)?
     
  4. Hix

    Hix Wildlife Enthusiast and Lover of Islands Premium Member

    Joined:
    20 Oct 2008
    Posts:
    5,659
    Location:
    Christmas Island
  5. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    16,320
    Location:
    omnipresent
    the one I have with me is the 2001 first edition, the one with my other books is the 2004 second edition. I haven't seen the 2010 third edition.
     
  6. LaughingDove

    LaughingDove Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    16 May 2014
    Posts:
    1,938
    Location:
    Warsaw, Poland
    I have the third edition, though I can't say if it's any better than any other edition as it's the only one I've seen.:p
    It doesn't have separate illustrations for Short-eared and Mountain Brushtail however there are separate species texts and maps for them and it says 'Short-eared Brushtail Possum and Mountain Brushtail Possum' next to the illustrations with the note that 'discriminating features suitable for field identification have not been determined'.
     
  7. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    1 Aug 2010
    Posts:
    4,573
    Location:
    Melbourne, Aust (ex. NZ)
    Thanks LD, I'll see if I can find a copy this weekend and do a bit of a comparison. Online reviews state that it includes "all 382" Australian mammals, which is not many more than the 2nd edition's "all 378".

    Thanks Hix. Do you think the first Ronald Strahan & Steve Van Dyck book you linked above is better than the Menkhorst & Knight one? If so, why?

    I also saw this interesting book on the CSIRO website: Taxonomy of Australian Mammals (Taxonomy of Australian Mammals, Stephen Jackson and Colin Groves, 9781486300129). Anyone encountered this? Insane price though.
     
  8. LaughingDove

    LaughingDove Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    16 May 2014
    Posts:
    1,938
    Location:
    Warsaw, Poland
    I actually saw that and had a flick through it in the gift shop of the Queensland Museum in Brisbane. It was pretty interesting but quite a heavy read with pages of dense, technical text with no pictures or anything like that. I would certainly have bought it though if it was cheaper (I think it was priced at $199) and if I wasn't flying Jet Star with tight baggage restrictions.
     
  9. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    16,320
    Location:
    omnipresent
    the Strahan book is completely different to the field guide, it is more the sort of book you have on your bookshelf for reference. Older editions available from Amazon for less than $4 though: https://www.amazon.com/MAMMALS-AUSTRALIA-Ronald-Strahan/dp/1560986735

    Another mammal book is Cronin's Key Guide: I have it with my other books but I can't remember if it includes all species, or otherwise how much use it is.
    https://www.amazon.com/Cronins-Key-Guide-Australian-Mammals/dp/1741751101
     
  10. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    16,320
    Location:
    omnipresent
  11. Hix

    Hix Wildlife Enthusiast and Lover of Islands Premium Member

    Joined:
    20 Oct 2008
    Posts:
    5,659
    Location:
    Christmas Island
    I don't think I have Menkhorst and Knight (if I do, I don't really use it). The Strahan and van Dyck book is probably the definitive tome, and I use it for identifications and information - but it stays at home, never goes into the field (too big and way too heavy).

    The Field Companion, however is brilliant. It had descriptions of all the species, keys to everything, and each group is given a 'frustration rating', to indicate how difficult it is to identify related species. For instance, Monotremes have a frustration index of 1, whereas dunnarts have an index of 8.

    (Virtually all my books are in storage and I haven't seen them for many months, so the examples given above are probably not exact, but you get the idea.)

    :p

    Hix
     
  12. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    16,320
    Location:
    omnipresent
    the Andrew Isles site has a couple of images of the pages inside to give an idea: https://www.andrewisles.com/all-stock/publication/field-companion-to-the-mammals-of-australia

    I've never seen the book myself, looks good, but really it looks inferior to the Menkhorst and Knight field guide for practical use.