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First zoos with okapis

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Tiger, 11 Aug 2021.

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  1. Tiger

    Tiger Well-Known Member

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    1 Jul 2021
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    Location:
    Belgium
    Hi, I'm looking for some information about the first zoos with okapis.
    What I already know:
    Antwerp Zoo became the first zoo with okapis in 1919 with okapi Buta. In 1928 a new one, called Tele, arrived.
    The Bronx Zoo received their first okapi in 1937.
    London Zoo received their first okapi in 1935.
    Information about Europe is easy to find, but I would like to know more about when the many holders of okapis in North America received their okapis. Information about other holders in, for example: Africa or Japan, would also be useful.
    Thanks.
     
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  2. Bib Fortuna

    Bib Fortuna Well-Known Member

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    Tatooine
    This webside might be useful :

    http://theokapi.org/welcome.aspx
     
  3. Tiger

    Tiger Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Belgium
  4. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Amsterdam, Holland
    I just stumbled upon this scientific promotion and paper dealing with colonialism and okapis ex situ. It definitely has a bit of an "woke" element to it and whereas fascinating reading does it left me a bit thinking.

    SOURCE: https://libstore.ugent.be/fulltxt/RUG01/002/782/331/RUG01-002782331_2019_0001_AC.pdf

    When looking at the chapter written on captive-breeding (only from pages 138-140 or so in some detail), I was surprised that it only referred to the early development of discovery, capture and captive-breeding and completely failed to even acknowledge the existence of present day conservation and the www.okapiconservation.org or even the very important role played by ex situ zoo institutions and conservation bodies both in captive breeding as well as critical support for in situ conservation. Without the captive community or Epulu station in present day DRC okapis would probably never have been afforded to protection and conservation measures implemented today in Ituri, Maiko or Abumonbanzi Reserve and the Virunga NP.