Join our zoo community

Foreign Correspondent: Siberian Tigers

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Simon Hampel, 8 Jun 2007.

  1. Simon Hampel

    Simon Hampel Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    18 Oct 2003
    Posts:
    5,688
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
  2. patrick

    patrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    29 Nov 2004
    Posts:
    2,449
    Location:
    melbourne, victoria, australia
    yeah i saw this. ya know what annoys me? siberian tigers are in trouble - even more so are amur leopards. the tigers are extremely common in zoos. the leopards less so, with even fewer pure breds but nonetheless miles ahead of their wild counterparts. if zoos breed endangered species to be "arks" and so that one day they can "release animals into the wild" i see no better time than now! there is something like just a couple of breeding female leopards left!!

    anyone? anyone?
     
  3. Jarkari

    Jarkari Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Aug 2006
    Posts:
    1,525
    Location:
    Orange, NSW
    Crocodylus has two of these amur leopards doesn't it. I've only ever seen one leopard in an australian zoo and that was through the shark tank and loungeroom of the owners house.
     
  4. patrick

    patrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    29 Nov 2004
    Posts:
    2,449
    Location:
    melbourne, victoria, australia
    nope. crocodylus has persian leopards.

    you know someone who keeps a leopard and shark in their loungeroom?
     
  5. Jarkari

    Jarkari Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Aug 2006
    Posts:
    1,525
    Location:
    Orange, NSW
    ah that's right... my bad... Richard tindale... lo don't know him but they used to keep leopards on the other side of the house. you could see them by looking through the shark tank and the lounge room. National Zoo in canberra
     
  6. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2006
    Posts:
    18,243
    Location:
    england
    You may be interested that on this side of the World there is quite a big push to increase the numbers of Amur Leopards by captive breeding. A number of Uk zoos have 'gone over' to this (sub)species in recent years and most zoos exhibiting leopards here now have these. They breed quite freely too. Not sure but I think its a similar pattern in Europe too.
     
  7. patrick

    patrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    29 Nov 2004
    Posts:
    2,449
    Location:
    melbourne, victoria, australia
    i read that recent tests on the US animals dismissed the bulk from the breedingprogram as there was evidence of hybridisation. still, it implied there was till a bigger genepool in zoos than the wild.

    i think in the case of the amur leopards, a more effective result to boosting wild gentics with zoo stock might be acheived by, rather than introducing captive animals intothe wild, instead bring wild animals into captivity temporarily. if you can get a wild female inseminated or bred with a captive male (in an on site facility in the region of course) you could then release her again, where she would no doubt raise her half-captive-stock cubs to be wild, to be wild. this sort of methodology could be achieved with many species that are particuarly difficult to re-train to be wild. the trick is that you have to make sure the species never becomes extinct in the wild or the wild-learnt behaviours could be lost..
     
  8. Coquinguy

    Coquinguy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    30 Aug 2005
    Posts:
    1,765
    Location:
    australia
    and you would have to convince a corrupt and increasingly hostile government to either invest money into such a venture or allow foreign agencies in to do the work for them. i like the idea, i really do...
     
  9. jay

    jay Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    8 Jan 2004
    Posts:
    1,907
    Location:
    brisbane, qld, australia
    I don't know anything about the leopards, just why are they declining so badly, usually leopards are the cat species that seems to thrive near humans 9 as in Africa)
     
  10. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2006
    Posts:
    18,243
    Location:
    england
    I suspect its because this is a Russian species, where the hunting ethic is still very strong, and an animal protection very hard to maintain or enforce?