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German wolves spread to the Czech republic

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by Jana, 6 Sep 2014.

  1. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member 15+ year member

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    Photo traps and withneses have proved that a pair of wolves living near town Doksy in lowland north Bohemia has a litter of at least 4 cubs! This pair formed last year and it is their first litter. They came most probably from Lausitz-population (former Eastern Germany), that started in 2000 by immigrated Polish wolves.

    The Czech republic used to be a part of eurasian wolf range till second half of 19th century. After 1994, first wolves came back to Beskydy mountains on eastern Czech/Slovak border - they were Carpathian wolves. The strong hunting pressure in Slovakia and illegal killings on the Czech side lead to their low count and they might dissapear again soon.

    The lowland German-Polish wolf population is growing and spreading on the other hand, being fully protected by law. Some groups have teritories near or directly on the Czech border. But this pair near Doksy is the first one so far inland. May it breed like rabbits and help to recolonize our country.
     
  2. jay

    jay Well-Known Member 20+ year member

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    That is good news. Do local people have concerns about the wolf in their region
     
  3. Jana

    Jana Well-Known Member 15+ year member

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    Yes. Farm animal breeders and especially hunters are not happy with the return of wolves.

    Any damage caused by wolves on domestic animals is 100% refunded by state authorities, but the breeder must prove he tried to protect its herd first. Either by owning a trained dog, or by moving the herd into fenced area during the night. To feed a dog or to buy fences cost some money. But hardly anybody keeps sheep or goats in that region.

    Bigger problem are hunters. Hunting is just a hobby, but groups of hunters must pay a fixed rent for their hunting area to the land owners, regardless of how much huntable game lives there. If wolves come and kill some game, there is less for hunters left. Most of shot deer/mouflon/boar is sold to restaurants as meat and the money goes to the hunter. Thus wolves are considered unwanted and illegally shot.

    Normal local people who have no economic conflict with wolves don´t fear them or anything. Wolves don´t attack people. The recent cub photos were made just 1-2 km away from Máchovo jezero, a large water reservoir 50 km from Prague, densely surrounded by holiday resorts, and very popular as a domestic tourist destination. When I was reading comments to newspaper articles about the wolf cubs, nobody was affraid of wolf attack or negative influence on tourism. Most comments just feared hunters will shoot them sooner or later to protect their profit.
     
  4. jay

    jay Well-Known Member 20+ year member

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    Thank you for that reply. I am glad that the general, non hunting, population aren't concerned about the wolves nearby. I would imagine that wolves in the region could bactually be a tourist drawcard. As for the hunters, I can understand their concerns and they must be dealt with sensitively, but I hope that they accept the wolves.