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Golden snub-nosed monkeys for Europe

Discussion in 'China' started by Sneeuwpanter, 1 Sep 2016.

  1. Sneeuwpanter

    Sneeuwpanter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    1 Apr 2011
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    kampen
    Prague Zoo is getting snub-nosed monkeys. I was wondering if this could be the start of a breeding program or a panda-like loan system.
     
  2. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    25 Jan 2006
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    Location:
    Amsterdam, Holland
    P.R. China consciously enters into MoU's with other countries and zoo organizations, which has been demonstrated already in all the giant panda deals. With snub-nosed monkeys I for the moment I really doubt that this would be expanded, as it seems to be a friendship city to city deal with economic side-benefits between Praha and Beijing.

    In the none to distant past Rotterdam Zoo had a similar deal with Shanghai and quite a few interesting species entered the European realm, a.o. the first red goral, tufted deer, Sichuan takin, Thorold's deer, Francois langur. There had even been talk of sorts of snub nosed monkeys, but that never materialized. The reason cited at the time was that even the most numerous golden snub-nosed species was not doing well enough for the Chinese conservation breeding program to be able to send a few monkeys to Rotterdam.

    Over the years, the Chinese component in Rotterdam Zoo somewhat floundered - which I think may be attributed exactly to the fact it was a one-off deal and not sustained further and very much a one zoo approach. These exchanges would be better embedded in my opinion in a more concerted effort by several European zoos working for the same goals and objectives. The EAZA TAG's would be an obvious framework for that. This way one would ensure that imports of say Sichuan takin will ultimately lead to building up a regional conservation breeding program able to sustain itself and enable further cross-continental exchanges up till mega population management of the entire zoo population both in P.R. China and overseas (we all benefit).

    Well, just some thoughts here ...