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Great Apes Entirely Indoors

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Anmltrnr98, 2 May 2022.

  1. Anmltrnr98

    Anmltrnr98 Active Member

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    I've been lucky to visit a number of zoos in the US northeast and midwest recently and I'm a bit surprised at how many great ape exhibits I've come across that are entirely indoors.

    Recently I've seen Buffalo (Gorillas), Pittsburgh (Orangutans), Cleveland (Orangutans), and Brookfield (Orangutans and Gorillas). It seems that none of these facilities have concrete plans to change this circumstance (except for Cleveland where a new exhibit should be completed by the end of the decade).

    Are there other accredited facilities where this is the case? How do you feel about the practice from a welfare standpoint? Are there any exceptional entirely indoor ape exhibits?
     
  2. Dhole dude

    Dhole dude Well-Known Member

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    Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo and (maybe?) Birmingham Zoo Alabama also have Orangutans entirely indoors.
     
  3. Bengal Tiger

    Bengal Tiger Well-Known Member

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    Brookfield's new masterplan is going to give the apes outdoor space.
     
  4. Zooplantman

    Zooplantman Well-Known Member

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    I wonder if there is any evidence that great apes do not thrive in these exhibits or is it an emotional discomfort with having them indoors?
     
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  5. snowleopard

    snowleopard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    There are approximately 45 American zoos with gorillas and only 2 of the establishments have the apes entirely indoors: Brookfield and Buffalo. Both of those exhibits are, in my opinion, appalling. It could be my discomfort at seeing gorillas without access to outdoor areas, but even as indoor zones those particular exhibits are ghastly. There is loads of mock-rock, with a limited amount of space.

    As for orangutans, there are 5 American zoos (out of about 50-ish) with orangutans kept entirely indoors. Birmingham, Brookfield, Cleveland, Fort Wayne and Pittsburgh are the zoos (and possibly Racine?) and it will be interesting to see which ones will continue to deny their orangs fresh air and an outdoor environment. Brookfield has been contemplating that notion for 40+ years!

    I cannot think of any American zoo maintaining either chimpanzees or bonobos (only 7 zoos) inside on a permanent basis.
     
    Last edited: 3 May 2022
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  6. Anmltrnr98

    Anmltrnr98 Active Member

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    I think a big part of it for me is definitely personal discomfort! A lot of that discomfort stems from context. In my opinion, part of a zoo's job is to show us how animals fit into the natural world. And an ape on a concrete floor feels very incongruous to that. I hadn't looked into peer-reviewed literature on the effects of living indoors prior to your comment, but here are a few pieces I found:

    The Choice to Access Outdoor Areas Affects the Behavior of Great Apes

    Not apes but... Depressive-like behavior, its sensitization, social buffering, and altered cytokine responses in rhesus macaques moved from outdoor social groups to indoor housing

    Ape behavior in two alternating environments: comparing exhibit and short-term holding areas
     
  7. Anmltrnr98

    Anmltrnr98 Active Member

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    No zoo or aquarium that I can think of, but many chimps in laboratory research lived entirely indoors.
     
  8. Jurek7

    Jurek7 Well-Known Member

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    These indoor places are often small and concrete.

    However, in principle, it is well known that many great apes in zoos prefer to stay indoors and often have to be shut outside. The reasons are not entirely clear. Some may be that the outdoor exhibits are simply too empty.

    My personal observation is that gorillas, as animals naturally living in dense, shady forest undergrowth, don't like open spaces, don't like to walk on grass which they find rough, don't like direct sun which is too bright to their eyes, and are far more sensitive to noise than humans. So they don't like a typical zoo outdoor exhibit: grass lawn with some climbing branches.
     
  9. pachyderm pro

    pachyderm pro Well-Known Member

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    One of the priorities for Brookfield's new director is outdoor great ape habitats. This is no longer a rumor like it's been for many years now, but an actual confirmed thing that is happening in the near future. Concept art has been drawn up and shown off internally. Within the next few years, both the gorillas and orangutans will have substantial outdoor exhibits that will stretch the entire north side of Tropic World.

    New Brookfield Zoo director wants animals to be as 'happy' as possible

    That leaves Buffalo as the lone zoo who will still be keeping gorillas indoors year-round. I believe at a time there was talk about turning the old elephant paddock into an outdoor gorilla habitat, although I'm not sure if that's still on the docket.
    Yes, Racine still keeps the orangutans indoors year round. An outdoor habitat was planned, but I believe it was scrapped at some point. No clue why management thinks this shouldn't be an immediate addition.
     
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  10. Zooplantman

    Zooplantman Well-Known Member

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    Thank-you for the links. Interesting reading. I wish more than one team of researchers was working on this.
     
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  11. Black Footed Beast

    Black Footed Beast Well-Known Member

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    Can confirm Racines Orangutans are entirely indoors, I do personally feel if they decided to ever remove the path by the other outdoor primate enclosures, they could probably make an outdoor enclosure for them there
     
  12. Neil chace

    Neil chace Well-Known Member

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    This is a topic that I've been going back and forth on how I feel about it for a while, and something I'm not sure there's one right answer to. Anyways, here are my thoughts:
    - Choice matters. As @Jurek7 mentioned, some zoos require their Gorillas to be in an outdoor habitat. This is just as bad as requiring them to be in an indoor habitat. Ideally, any zoo will provide their animals with choices of where to be, what to be doing, etc. at all times- and for great Apes as intelligent animals, part of that should be choosing location, indoors vs. outdoors, on-display vs. off-display, etc.
    - is this debate about quality gorilla exhibits or outdoor gorilla exhibits? Because they aren't the same thing. There have been some great ape exhibits which include outdoor access I have been appalled by (Orangutan exhibit at Philadelphia comes to mind), so it's not necessarily an end-all be-all to give outdoor access. While the current indoor exhibits aren't all the highest quality, suppose an all-indoor exhibit was? If Bronx's Congo Gorilla Forest was located under a geodesic Dome, allowing in natural light but keeping the Gorillas in a climate-controlled area, would people criticize the Gorillas are all indoors? Buffalo Zoo in particular I wonder about whether a higher quality indoor exhibit would be better than adding an outdoor exhibit, which would only be usable for less than half the year.
    - If Great Apes end up requiring outdoor access, what does this mean for other species? If we stick with Primates, why do great Apes need outdoor access and not, say, lemurs or guenons? I've seen some indoor primate exhibits that have been incredible, and don't see effective arguments being made that these animals need outdoor access. What's the difference? Size, intelligence, more closely related to humans?

    Just a few thoughts to consider in this debate.