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IUCN 25 Most Endangered Primates : Callitrichids (poll).

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by Onychorhynchus coronatus, 2 Dec 2020.

?

which species will you vote for ?

Poll closed 17 Dec 2020.
  1. Buffy tufted marmoset

    4 vote(s)
    80.0%
  2. Pied tamarin

    1 vote(s)
    20.0%
  1. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    This is the fifth installment in a series of polls based on the IUCN 25 Most Endangered Primates.

    This time featuring two Callitrichid species mentioned in the document which will go head to head: the pied tamarin and the buffy tufted marmoset.

    Zoochatters can vote based on the primate species whose conservation they would like to see prioritized, that they consider to be their favourite, whose plight moves them most, or that interests them.

    A discussion on these species and the conservation of endangered primate species in general is something I would like to encourage in the comment section too.

    Which species will you vote for and why?


    *For those curious about finding more about this IUCN report and the Callitrichid species that are featured in the document it can be read in the link posted here: https://www.globalwildlife.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Primates-in-Peril-2018-2020.pdf
     
    Last edited: 2 Dec 2020
  2. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    As many of you will know I work with the conservation of the buffy tufted marmoset here in Brazil and so I would like to do something slightly different with the comment section of this poll.

    Regardless of whichever way you vote in this poll I would like to hear specifically from you all about how the profile of this species can be raised and your thoughts on its conservation.

    I am very interested in how we can raise the profile of this species and raise awareness of it both within Brazil and globally so I can say that I'll take on board any constructive suggestions and input on how this can be done.

    I'll also be happy to answer any questions here on the species and its conservation.

    How do you think the profile of the species can be raised globally ?

    What are your thoughts on this species?
     
    Last edited: 2 Dec 2020
  3. Zorro

    Zorro Well-Known Member

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    To be honest I would have a problem rating these as I dont know enough about them and for me to put one before the other is difficult!
     
  4. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    No problem Zorro, it makes sense as they are both quite obscure and poorly known endemic Brazilian species that are not held by that many zoos.

    The pied tamarin is held by a number of zoos both inside and outside Brazil and so is comparatively better known by zoo visitors.

    However, the buffy tufted marmoset is only held in zoos within Brazil and has been a species that has been in the shadows a lot in terms of its conservation profile (something that we are desperately trying to improve).

    In terms of Callitrichid conservation both of these species have sort of been historically stuck in the shadows of more well known "poster children" of conservation like the golden lion tamarin and to a lesser extent the black lion tamarin.
     
    Last edited: 2 Dec 2020
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  5. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    So...Buffy tufted marmoset in the lead, looking good :)
     
  6. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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  7. Tetzoo Quizzer

    Tetzoo Quizzer Well-Known Member

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    Ok, regarding Buffy-tufted Marmoset - I confess to knowing next to nothing about it. I could look up it’s distribution and threats, but they are not facts I know, so it is very, very far down on the global profile scale. How to raise this? Well, from a UK (and wider) point of view, an article in BBC Wildlife magazine would be a good start. It (or its predecessor) has been going for over 50 years, it is well respected and widely circulated. Animals featured in it are therefore known, and , bearing in mind the scale of the biodiversity crisis, others will be ignored. National Geographic similarly.
    What you need is a hook to hang the story on, and some good photos. Does it occur where it is easily visible? I gather hybridisation is the problem; why are they hybridising now? Is there a scientific side to the story that could link to better known examples, eg Scottish Wild Cats? Is there something that concerned individuals within the native range can do?
    Hope this helps.
     
  8. Zorro

    Zorro Well-Known Member

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    How many new species have they found in resent times? :)
     
  9. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your comment @Tetzoo Quizzer and not a problem at all as it isn't a very well known species even here in Brazil let alone abroad.

    In the UK we are raising awareness and gaining assistance through our involvement with zoos like Jersey / Durrell Trust, Paignton, Shaldon, Twycross and several others too, we are well connected in this regard.

    The Buffy tufted ear marmoset (Callithrix aurita) | Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust

    https://www.mountainmarmosetsconser...ernational-interest-in-the-Mountain-Marmosets

    Brazil — Shaldon Zoo

    In Continental Europe in France the brilliant Beauval zoo has helped enormously in so many ways in assisting our efforts and in the Netherlands Apenheul zoo have also been of great help too.

    https://beauvalnature.org/fr/conservation/programme/ouistitis-oreillards

    https://www.mountainmarmosetsconservation.com/single-post/2018/10/31/test-3
     
    Last edited: 3 Dec 2020
  10. Tetzoo Quizzer

    Tetzoo Quizzer Well-Known Member

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    Hmm! Problems with hybridisation with released pets. I presume any rules or regulations applying to pet owners are out of the question? Such as compulsory sterilisation? Of the marmosets, not the owners!
     
  11. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    I have considered the idea of BBC Wildlife magazine and it is a possibility for sure and one that our programe would certainly like to explore.

    National Geographic too is interesting, watch this space.

    Mongabay recently released an article on our work which can be read in the link below and I hope there will be more in the future too.

    Marmosets trafficked as pets now threaten native species in Atlantic forest
     
  12. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    @Zorro do you mean of marmosets and tamarins ?

    Well our focal species were discovered by naturalists a long time ago in the 17th or 18th century if I remember correctly (though of course the indigenous Tupi-Guarani were the ones who first discovered them).

    But in the sense of Callitrichids in general that is an interesting question indeed and one that I must admit I don't know how to answer really.

    Tamarin species seem to be being discovered every other year in the Amazon basin as there is an enormous diversity of primates in that region and indeed it is the most biodiverse area for primates in the world.

    The most recent species discovery that I remember was a little tamarin which was scientifically described in 2019 and has been called the mico Munduruku. The word "mico" is the Portuguese word for tamarin so the and "Munduruku" refers to the name of the tribe that inhabits the area it was discovered.

    New monkey species found in Amazon forest area that’s fast disappearing

    The tragedy of course is that almost as soon as these Amazonian species are discovered we also invariably discover how endangered they are due to the extent of the anthropogenic threats that they are facing from deforestation.
     
    Last edited: 3 Dec 2020
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  13. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the main threat to both species we work with (callithrix flaviceps and callithrix aurita) is the spread of invasive species of marmoset (callithrix jacchus and callithrix pencillata) into the last remaining fragments of Atlantic rainforest where these species are still extant.

    In terms of the illegal pet trade the genie is unfortunately out of the bottle so to speak. Let me explain, the illegal pet trade is still ongoing and São Paulo, Belo Horizonte and Rio de Janeiro are major hubs for this traffick. In this sense it is a matter of enforcement, legislation and environmental education for the general population.

    However, the problem is that the invasive swarms that we see encroaching into the Atlantic rainforest and hybridizing with our focal species are typically not recently released animals but actually the descendents of trafficked animals or pets that were either released or escaped in the 70's , 80's , 90's and 2000's (perhaps even earlier into the 1960's, we just dont know).

    The populations of the invasives have grown enormously since becoming established in this area of Brazil and in fact are facilitated by the growing levels of urbanization and deforestation of the Atlantic rainforest. Unfortunately, these are species which adapt extremely well to anthropogenic environments (unlike aurita and flaviceps which are highly sensitive and do not persist with these stressors) and use them extremely well too.

    Marmosets are illegal pets here in Brazil without the correct permits and authorization and most owners of these animals do not have these. Sterilization of invasives and hybrids is a complicated issue and one that we will have to consider the merits or flaws of in the future.

    Certainly something has to be done about the invasive species but this is a very complex set of circumstances (it always is when it comes to invasive species) and we are doing all we can to work towards developing evidence and scientific (both hard science and social science) based solutions.
     
    Last edited: 3 Dec 2020
  14. Zorro

    Zorro Well-Known Member

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    Yes sorry I meant both :)
    I saw something on the tv a couple of years ago when some primate guy from outside of south America saw a new species of Tamarin when passing through some small village which someone had it as a pet. When he asked where they got it the person took him out to the location only to find yet another yet unknown species :D
     
    Last edited: 3 Dec 2020
  15. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    That sounds like it quite possibly could have been the primatologist Marc Van Roosmalen who was being filmed.

    He really did a lot in terms of discovering new primate species in Amazonia and there are a number of species that are known to science because of his efforts (not just primates but other mammals and possibly reptiles and birds too).
     
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  16. Zorro

    Zorro Well-Known Member

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    Yes I have read about his work, not sure if this was him perhaps it was :D
     
  17. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Very distinctive looking guy, tall, lanky and blonde hair / beard.
     
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  18. Zorro

    Zorro Well-Known Member

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    Dont recall now to much water under the bridge since!
     
  19. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

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    Forgot about this.

    Yay ! :D the buffy tufted marmoset won !