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IUCN Amphibian Update: Bad News in Australia, Good News in South America

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by birdsandbats, 8 Jul 2018.

  1. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    This article talks about some updates made to amphibians on the Red List. The ones mentioned are:

    • Grassland Earless Dragon goes from Vulnerable to Endangered due to predation from Feral Cats.
    • Mitchell's Water Monitor goes from Endangered to Critically Endangered. Cane Toads are to blame here.
    • The Bartle Frere Cool-Skink is now listed as Vulnerbale due to climate change.
    • Four South American species have been rediscovered. The Rio Pescado Stubfoot Toad, Quito Stubfoot Toad, Carchi Andes Toad, and Atelopus nanay. Is is worth noting that the article has a picture of what appears to be Quito Stubfoot Toads mating in captivity.
    Red List update: Australian reptiles in crisis, surprise toad rediscovery
     
  2. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Article here from last year: Boy finds ‘extinct’ frog in Ecuador and helps revive species

    The researchers then faced the huge task of getting the 43 individuals rescued from the wild to reproduce in the lab.

    “For several months, the frogs would mate but never lay eggs,” Coloma recalls. “So we decided to move them to an outdoor enclosure.

    “When we finally discovered the eggs, we felt like Thomas Edison must have felt seeing an electric bulb lighting for the first time. It was extraordinary,” says Coloma.

    The resulting tadpoles are strong and feeding well.
     
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  3. AWP

    AWP Well-Known Member

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    Centro Jambatu and Bioparque Amaru (I visited this zoo last year) are both involved in captive breeding programs for several of Ecuador's critically endangered stubfoot toads.
     
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