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Jurong Bird Park Jurong Bird Park news 2016

Discussion in 'Singapore' started by Calyptorhynchus, 19 Jul 2016.

  1. Calyptorhynchus

    Calyptorhynchus Well-Known Member

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    A few updates from Jurong:

    The recently added Coletos have started breeding and there are a few chicks being hand-reared at the Breeding Station.

    Other hatchings include Turquoise tanagers and Red&Yellow Barbets as well as a Lesser Bird of Paradise at the Breeding Station. Also saw a family of Magpie Geese with at least 4 goslings at the Wetlands.

    New additions: Mindanao Lorikeets, Mount Goliath Lorikeets, Yellow-legged Honeycreepers.

    Sarus Cranes are now in one of the former Cassowary paddocks.

    A pair of Black-necked Cranes and a female Black-necked Jabiru greet you on the way to WIngs of Asia.

    Raggiana Birds of Paradise have replaced the Cock of the Rock at the Windows of Paradise.
     
  2. Calyptorhynchus

    Calyptorhynchus Well-Known Member

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    Forgot to add Blue-crowned Motmots are now at Heliconia valley.
     
  3. Zooish

    Zooish Well-Known Member

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    Northern Bald Ibis, NeNe and Blue-winged Geese were recently added to Wetlands exhibit as well.
     
  4. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    wow I never would have picked those first two to ever appear at Jurong! (I'm not entirely sure why I would think that, they just seem unusual species for the collection).
     
  5. Calyptorhynchus

    Calyptorhynchus Well-Known Member

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    There has been a large influx of new species into the Jurong collection, presumably in preparation for the new park. I will try to visit soon again and post an updated species list of display.
     
  6. Zooish

    Zooish Well-Known Member

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    Jurong has become a member of a Brazilian government project to reintroduce Spix's Macaws back into the wild. The nature of Jurong's involvement was not detailed though, but likely involves providing funds. Perhaps Jurong will receive an assurance colony at some point (seeing as other members of the project include Al Wabra and ACTP)?

    https://www.facebook.com/wrs.sg/pho...74575967050/10153623700427051/?type=3&theater
     
  7. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

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    Are these more-or-less random species or is Jurong trying to change its collection in specific ways (e.g. to increase the diversity, or focus more on South-East Asian birds)?
     
  8. Calyptorhynchus

    Calyptorhynchus Well-Known Member

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    From what I've been told, the collection will shift more towards species of the indo-pacific region, plus more rare and endangered ones.
    Little or no birds of prey, few waders, lots of passerines (birds of paradise included) and pigeons and lories.
    The hornbills will continue to have centre stage, as the larger parrots that jurong breeds so well. Also maybe more than 1 cassowary species.
    Heard the ostriches may be gone to the zoo.
     
  9. Zooish

    Zooish Well-Known Member

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    Any word on the penguin collection? They don't really fit with the new bird park's theming and concept, but are extremely popular with the regular zoo crowd.
     
  10. Kifaru Bwana

    Kifaru Bwana Well-Known Member

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    I just thought the Jurong park was supposed to be integrated / amalgamated into the Singapore Zoo itself?!

    Still an increased focus on S.E. Asian birds is not a bad thing given the level of threat to a good number of species from the region and Jurong being quite capable of having a significant impact on ex situ conservation breeding.

    Incidentally, they took in f.i. green magpie and various laughing thrushes and mynah last year.
     
  11. Calyptorhynchus

    Calyptorhynchus Well-Known Member

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    Most likely a sub-antartic indoor eclosure with King, Gentoo, chinstrap and some form or rockhopper or macaroni.
    No idea about the African ones.
     
  12. TheDisneyTeen

    TheDisneyTeen Member

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    They're obtaining more species of penguins? :eek:
     
  13. Calyptorhynchus

    Calyptorhynchus Well-Known Member

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    Well they have King, Humboldt, Macaroni and Rockhopper indoors now, and African outdoors. So the Gentoo and Chinstrap would be new additions.
     
  14. Calyptorhynchus

    Calyptorhynchus Well-Known Member

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    Visit to Jurong

    As promised I visited Jurong and will try to post a revised list of species currently on display, as it seems to be changing quite rapidly presumably because of the new park project.
    I posted the penguin species in my previous post, so after penguins this is what you'd be able to see:

    Flamingo Pond

    American Flamingo

    World of Darkness

    Eurasian Eagle owl
    Snowy owl
    Barn owl
    Morepork owl
    Boobook owl
    Cape Thicknee
    Malay Fish owl
    Spotted Wood owl

    Heliconia Valley


    I. Collared Kingfisher / Malay Peacock-Pheasant
    II. White-throated Kingfisher / Blue-win Pitta / Luzon Bleeding-heart
    III. Blue-crowned Motmot
    IV. Turquoise Tanager (w/ chicks) / White-lined Tanager / Green Honeycreeper / Olive-backed Sunbird / Chestnut-bellied Seed-finch / Crimson Masked Tanager / Grey Sparrow
    V. Hildebrandt's Starling / Rueppell's Long-tailed Starling / Orange-cheeked Waxbill / Cuthroat / Tambourine Dove / White-crowned Robin-chat / Hildebrandt's Francolin / Blue-naped Mousebird
    VI. Gouldian Finch / Blue-faced Parrot Finch / Plum-headed Finch / Diamond Firetail / Zebra Finch / Diamond Dove / Scarlet-chested Parakeet / Green-naped Pheasant-pigeon / Hooded Pitta / Mountain Bamboo-partridge
    VII. Wattled Starling / Red&Yellow Barbet (w/ chick) / Chestnut Weaver / Speckled Mousebird / Tambourine Dove / Abyssinian Lovebird
    VIII. Green Broadbill / Turquoise Tanager / Green Honeycreeper / Yellow-legged Honeycreeper / Northern Lapwing / Masked Lapwing (looked juvenile) / White-naped Pheasant-pigeon / Bartlett's Bleeding-heart / Crested Wood-partridge
     
  15. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    they have morepork? How? And also why have both morepork and boobook, which are basically the same? Do you mean Tawny Frogmouth (just a guess because they are sometimes called moreporks or mopokes)?
     
  16. Calyptorhynchus

    Calyptorhynchus Well-Known Member

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    The sign said Morepork owl. They have no Frogmouths (the Night Safari has them).
     
  17. lowland anoa

    lowland anoa Well-Known Member

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    The Moreporks and Booboks are not practically the same, the Morepork is more known as the Tasmanian Spotted Owl (Ninox novaeseelandiae) and one of its subspecies is sometimes called the Tasmanian Boobok. And the Tawny Frogmouth is sometimes mistakenly called the Mopoke, which, in fact, is a common name for the Southern Boobok Owl. The Southern Boobok and Frogmouth's calls are often confused with each other.

    Just to end the confusion :eek:
     
    Last edited: 27 Jul 2016
  18. Calyptorhynchus

    Calyptorhynchus Well-Known Member

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    Continuing....

    Wetlands (recently renovated)

    This is a set of two twin aviaries, that are viewed through a glassed tunnel (sides only).
    Large flocks (100+) of Scarlet Ibis and Roseate Spoonbills can be seen in both aviaries and this gives a sense of continuity. Straw-neck Ibis are also found in both, but in much lower numbers.
    Other species present are:
    Waldrapp / Eurasian Spoonbill / Hammerkop / Nankeen Night-heron / Nene / Abyssinian Blue-winged Goose / Magpie Goose (w/ goslings) / Crested Mynah :)confused:)

    The former spoonbill aviary, which is seen only from above in the main road is home to: Peruvian pelican / Sacred Ibis / American White Ibis / Eurasian Magpie (!!)

    Royal Ramble

    This is a series of three contiguous aviaries that used to house three species of crowned pigeons (and some hybrids as the birds kept crossing through). Currently it seems to be a mixed area of pigeons and other species.

    aviary 1: Pinon Imperial Pigeon / Common Crowned Pigeon / Peruvian Pigeon / Purple-crested Turaco

    Aviary 2: Sclater's Crowned Pigeon (the only ones I know in captivity?) / Crested Pigeon / Senegal Dove / Stock Dove / Common Woodpigeon / Zebre Dove / Long-tailed Starling / Greater Blue-eared Starling

    aviary 3 : Green peafowl / Von der Decken's Hornbill (odd combination)

    Hornbills & Toucans

    This area is famous for its large aviaries and housed Jurong's renowned collection of Hornbills, as well as a few Toucan species (traditionally not well represented in the park). Starting from the top near the keeper interactive area you can see:

    Bornean Rhinoceros Hornbill
    Red-billed Toucan
    Bar-pouched Hornbill (2 aviaries, each w// 1 pair)
    Red-billed Hornbill
    Von der Decken's Hornbill
    African pied Hornbill
    Luzon Hornbill
    Trumpeter Hornbill
    Southern Ground Hornbill (adult pair and 3 juveniles :eek:)
    Malayan Rhinoceros Hornbill (2 aviaries, 1 pair each)
    Great Hornbill (3 aviaries, 1 pair each)
    Papuan Hornbill (2 aviaries, 1 pair with juveniles, 1 pair w/out)
    White-crested Hornbill (1 aviary with a pair, another with 2 females)
    Oriental Pied Hornbill
    Malayan Black Hornbill
    Toco Toucan
    Wrinkled Hornbill
    African Grey Hornbill
    Bushy-crested Hornbill]
    African Crowned Hornbill (w/ juvenile)
    Mindanao Rufous Hornbill

    Windows on Paradise

    This is the Bird of Paradise aviaries, which regularly rotates through the species held by the park, and also housed the Andean Cock-of-the-Rock.
    At the time the species on display were:

    Raggiana Bird of Paradise

    Lesser Bird of Paradise / Great Argus / Common Crowned PIgeon / Island Imperial Pigeon

    Red Bird of Paradise / Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon / Victoria Crowned Pigeon

    Behind the scenes : Andean Cock-of-the-rock / King Bird of Paradise / Twelve-wired Bird of Paradise

    Lory Loft

    This is the lorry feeding aviary, a large lusciously planted area, that has seen the number of birds decrease over the years but still offers a great experience. Species currently housed here:

    Green-naped Lorikeet
    Rainbow (Swainson's) Lorikeet
    Red-collared Lorikeet
    Marigold Lorikeet
    Red Lory
    Blue-streaked Lory
    Black-capped Lory
    Chattering lorry
    Yellow-bibbed Lory
    Purple-naped Lory
    Red-sided Eclectus
    Tanimbar Cockatoo
    Major Mitchell Cockatoo
     
  19. MikeG

    MikeG Well-Known Member

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    No, actually they're quite common in captivity.
    The confusion probably arises because many/most of the Sclater's Crowned Pigeons in zoos are labelled as 'Scheepmaker's Crowned Pigeon', but are in fact Sclater's (Goura scheepmakeri sclaterii) - which is now sometimes treated as a full species.
     
  20. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    did they have the scientific names on the signs? I'm wondering if by morepork they mean the Australian boobook (formerly conspecific, in which case they would probably be using the morepork's scientific name anyway rather than the boobook's, so that wouldn't particularly help) and by boobook they mean one of the other Ninox like N. japonica or something like that. I just find it curious that they would have actual moreporks.