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Juvenile Komodo Dragons

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Lyrebird, 17 Feb 2013.

  1. Lyrebird

    Lyrebird Well-Known Member

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    One of the juvenile Komodo's that has been in quarantine at Taronga is now on exhibit in their reptile house, with the others (6?) being sent out to other zoos.
     
  2. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

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    Any idea which zoos the other juveniles were sent to?

    Edit: Looks like the Australian Reptile Park may have recieved a pair. I guess Melbourne and Adelaide are the other two top contenders, but there are a few other places they could have gone to too.
     
    Last edited: 17 Feb 2013
  3. Lyrebird

    Lyrebird Well-Known Member

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    Gosford definitely received at least one, as did a QLD facility that previously hasn't held this species.
     
  4. nanoboy

    nanoboy Well-Known Member

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    I wonder which facility? :confused: Any ideas Steve? :p
     
  5. zooman

    zooman Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    When l was at Fort Worth zoo last year l had a interesting conversation with the Komodo Dragon keeper.

    He suggested that there was a problem of obesity with the USA population of Komodo Dragon as they had all been fed way to well as juveniles, l have heard of this happening with other reptiles including star tortoises.
     
  6. Campbell

    Campbell New Member

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    Cairns Tropical Zoo has received at least one Komodo Dragon.
     
  7. Steve Robinson

    Steve Robinson Well-Known Member

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    I wish!!!!!!!!!!!! However, I wouldn't want just one. Not much point keeping them without trying to breed them.
     
  8. Lyrebird

    Lyrebird Well-Known Member

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    Cairns was the one I was hinting at. I got no idea where the rest are going.
     
  9. nanoboy

    nanoboy Well-Known Member

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    And here I was thinking that this was the big surprise that you had in store for us this year. :p
     
  10. CGSwans

    CGSwans Well-Known Member

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    This is very exciting. Hopefully there's one in Melbourne.

    It actually does make sense that they're sending them out as solitary animals, as aren't they all from the same litter? I'm guessing the hope will be to gradually import individuals that are less related to form pairs when the time comes.
     
  11. Coquinguy

    Coquinguy Well-Known Member

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    Taronga indicated that this was the reasoning behind the strategy last year (import more animals later on down the track). I saw them yesterday, in the main building of reptile world in an exhibit that I remember holding snakes most recently.
    Long-term, I think they are going to have to come up with a purpose built facility for Komodos, I wouldnt mind seeing the old aviaries opposite reptile world being converted for this purpose....retain and restore the exterior fabric of the buildings and enhance the rest of the space to become a breeding facility.
     
  12. Jabiru96

    Jabiru96 Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately Taronga's adult male has killed previous mates so he is no use as a breeding male. Exciting news though!
     
  13. Lyrebird

    Lyrebird Well-Known Member

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    Having bred a few monitor species myself, I think it may be simply a case of finding a compatible female. Despite a slow intro last time, he still ripped her apart - as you said. Sometimes reptiles will reject mates several times before settling for one in particular. Happens often with crocodilians too.
     
  14. Jabiru96

    Jabiru96 Well-Known Member

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    Oh ok, didn't know that. However I'm not sure if he is too old as he is around 25 years of age. Anyone know how old they can live for?
     
  15. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

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    The wikipedia entry has two potential maximum longevities - 30 years and 50 years, although they might refer to wild and captive individuals possibly.

    As for introducing females to this male - how many do you risk? He might kill the next ten females introduced to him before choosing a mate. Is ther any way to reduce this risk? Introduce females larger than him, or give the female means to escape him?
     
  16. Lyrebird

    Lyrebird Well-Known Member

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    Bingo!
    Both of those ideas would greatly minimise the risk losing her to an attack. Visual and contact barriers were used previously, and these should be used again in the future.
     
  17. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    How much is known about the social lives of Komodos? Growing up in isolation, might they miss out on social skills learning, and be harder to pair up as a result? Works for birds & mammals.
     
  18. zooboy28

    zooboy28 Moderator Staff Member

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    So Cairns Tropical Zoo recieved 1.0, and the Australian Reptile Park got 1.1, with Taronga retaining 1.1 (plus their adult male making 2.1), so that just leaves two dragons unaccounted for.
     
  19. tetrapod

    tetrapod Well-Known Member

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    Being a parthenogenic species you could just keep one and breed, but of course it would need to be a female!
     
  20. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Perth Zoo has one: Perth Zoo's first dragons