Join our zoo community

Most Fun Scientific Names

Discussion in 'Zoo Cafe' started by birdsandbats, 29 Dec 2017.

  1. Kakapo

    Kakapo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    3 Mar 2009
    Posts:
    1,461
    Location:
    Zaragoza, Spain
    Thanks Chli, I can see the "manes" or crests in all these animals (the one that I don't knew is the cheetah, I was assuming something aboit the dorsal hair of the adult), just these really have not much reasons to be called a mane, being much smaller and almost unnoticeable than, for example, a lion mane.
    Well, in the case of sealions, I don't know. I always assumed that the thick neck of males are just neck flesh. Are you meaning that all this volume is actually hair? A shaved male sea lion would looks like thin-necked?
     
  2. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2007
    Posts:
    23,963
    Location:
    the world of tomorrow
    Why not? A mane is just an area of longer hair. It's irrelevent if it is smaller than a lion's mane. That's like saying an willow can't be called a tree because it isn't as big as a sequoia. Lions have manes but so do horses, and even human hair can be termed a mane.

    The males have thicker necks than females and a mane.
     
    Welsh Zootographer likes this.
  3. Kakapo

    Kakapo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    3 Mar 2009
    Posts:
    1,461
    Location:
    Zaragoza, Spain
    Well, is just that is not the image that I had in my mind of a mane. Humans have a mane, for sure, much more than the sea lions, orinoco geese and Bronchocela lizards.
     
  4. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10 Dec 2012
    Posts:
    14,130
    Location:
    fijnaart, the netherlands
  5. Jobovc

    Jobovc Active Member

    Joined:
    14 Jun 2019
    Posts:
    28
    Location:
    Slovenia
    Well, the child in me quite likes the Spermophilus genus. But even better is Anophthalmus hitleri, a species of a blind cave bettle, that only lives in five humid caves in Slovenia. A specimen was found in 1933 by a German biologist, who decided to name the beetle after Hitler, who had recently become Chancellor of Germany. Hitler even sent the guy a letter expressing his gratitude. Nowadays, it is at danger of extinction, mostly because of collectors of Hitler memorabilia, who desperately want to have one of these guys.
     
  6. SharkFinatic

    SharkFinatic Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Oct 2018
    Posts:
    1,005
    Location:
    U.S.
    Even though it's a fungus, I do find it amusing that they named one after SpongeBob: Spongiforma squarepantsii.
     
    Jobovc likes this.
  7. Cassidy Casuar

    Cassidy Casuar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    16 Jul 2014
    Posts:
    223
    Location:
    Wellington
    Nipponia nippon; the most Japanese scientific name there is.
     
  8. SharkFinatic

    SharkFinatic Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Oct 2018
    Posts:
    1,005
    Location:
    U.S.
    Judging from your profile pic, I'm not surprised that you find it amusing. (Please note, this comment is not intended to be mean. Just making a joke. If you don't find it funny, I apologize.)
     
    Cassidy Casuar likes this.
  9. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 Sep 2017
    Posts:
    5,052
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I don't get it.
     
  10. SharkFinatic

    SharkFinatic Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Oct 2018
    Posts:
    1,005
    Location:
    U.S.
    The joke is that Cassidy's profile pic is of an anime character.
     
  11. Cassidy Casuar

    Cassidy Casuar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    16 Jul 2014
    Posts:
    223
    Location:
    Wellington
    'Nippon', is one of the Japanese words for, 'Japan'.
     
    Last edited: 11 Nov 2019
    birdsandbats likes this.
  12. Cassidy Casuar

    Cassidy Casuar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    16 Jul 2014
    Posts:
    223
    Location:
    Wellington
    Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus (yellow head, yellow head), and, Poliocephalus poliocephalus (grey head, grey head).
     
  13. Hipporex

    Hipporex Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    19 Oct 2018
    Posts:
    1,604
    Location:
    Coronafornia
    Thank you for teaching me of this amazing name!

    This was the first name that came to mind when I saw this thread.

    Although it's not "as Japanese" as this ibis, you may or may not be aware there is a Nipponosaurus.

    Now it's my turn:
    • Species Dracorex hogwartsia (May be synonymous with Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis)
    • Genus Gojirasaurus (Now considered dubious)
    • Genus Thanos (This does put a smile on my face)
    • Species Aha ha
    • Species Ba humbugi
    • Species Kamera lens (A unicellular organism)
    • Genus Xenomorphia (In Paleogene France, no one can hear you scream)
    • Genus Wunderpus
    • Genus Galagadon (I may be Gen Z but I still like 80s references)
    • Genus Obamadon
    • Species Ricinus vaderi
    • Species Tianchisaurus nedegoapeferima (species epithet is formed from the surnames of Jurassic Park's main stars: Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, Richard Attenborough, Bob Peck, Martin Ferrero, Ariana Richards, and Joseph Mazzello)
     
    Cassidy Casuar likes this.
  14. Onychorhynchus coronatus

    Onychorhynchus coronatus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2019
    Posts:
    650
    Location:
    Brazil
    I've always found the Latin / scientific name for the black bearded saki monkey to be quite funny , Pithecia satanas, because it makes a specific cultural reference to the fictional Biblical character Satan.

    I have no idea who gave the monkey this scientific name but I always imagine some kind of prudish god fearing Georgian or Victorian naturalist who seeing the species with its bowl haircut , "beard", and very prominent testicles/ sexual organs was horrified by this "diabolic" South American primate.

    I wonder just what was going through that persons mind when they first saw it, very amusing to think about.
     
    Last edited: 12 Nov 2019
    Cassidy Casuar likes this.
  15. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10 Dec 2012
    Posts:
    14,130
    Location:
    fijnaart, the netherlands
    Who said Germans don't have a sense of humor ???
    German scientists have named a new frog genus and 3 species of it and given those tiny species the following names :
    Mini mum
    Mini ature
    Mini scule
     
  16. dt644

    dt644 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    20 Dec 2019
    Posts:
    121
    Location:
    Jinju-si, South korea
    Many Koreans who grew up watching Pokémon Anime series laugh when they hear this name. "Pica pica". It is the most common bird in Korea with Rock doves and sparrows. So when I go out of the house, I can see them almost every time.

    But sadly, the Pica pica in korea was classified as a separate species named "Pica serica" in 2018. So the magpie that I can see near my house is no longer Pica Pica.

    To write about one thing that only Koreans laughing, "Mola mola" too. Mola mola is the same pronunciation as Korean "몰라 몰라", which means "I don’t know, I don’t know".
     
    Last edited: 26 Dec 2019
    Cassidy Casuar likes this.
  17. Dassie rat

    Dassie rat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    18 Jun 2011
    Posts:
    2,381
    Location:
    London, UK
    I think the four-horned antelope's scientific name could be better:

    Tetracerus (four-horned) quadricornis (four-horned)
     
  18. amur leopard

    amur leopard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2019
    Posts:
    2,708
    Location:
    London
    And Vulpes vulpes vulpes :)
     
  19. Junklekitteb

    Junklekitteb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    13 Sep 2019
    Posts:
    499
    Location:
    India
    And Axis axis axis
     
  20. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    15 Oct 2010
    Posts:
    2,416
    Location:
    Dorset, UK
    Ursus arctos arctos (bear bear bear)