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My 2024 spec zoo thread

Discussion in 'Speculative Zoo Design and Planning' started by Haliaeetus, 13 Jan 2024.

  1. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Hello everybody,

    I introduce my speculative zoo thread for 2024.
    Here I will present 12 different projects, one per month.

    The first one is dedicated to the Islands of the World.

    Before releasing the map (I'll do it within the coming days), I explain that zoo is a re-edition of a previous project called Arkipelagos.

    This zoo will be divided in various sections that display the wildlife of one island or archipelago.
    I will also add marine species because most of them live around these islands (for example tropical reef fish around Melanesia or Indonesia).

    I will describe every species, as well as they are breeding or not in the zoo.
    Some species / zones wouldn't be realistic under current conditions, I assume that.

    A small number of species (small mammals, herps, insects...) isn't properly insulary or occur marginally on islands.
    I will explain the reasons for the presence of these species.

    About Oceania, I've avoided the species of mainland Australia, nonetheless I've included many species from the islets around (where some of them are maintained for conservation purposes), and obviously New Guinea, Tasmania and New Zealand.

    I changed the naming of a former zone called "Atlantropa" because I've learnt that it was a very mad project that consisted in the partial drying of the Mediterranean sea with a dam over the Gibraltar strait, promoted by a Nazist.
    Obviously it was never realized because of technical reasons (the marine strains are very powerful in the strait) and because of the geopolitics.

    I was inspired by various zoos including Chester (with its "Islands in danger" zone), the Dolfinarium of Hardewijk (in my opinion one of the rare good zoos for cetaceans in Europe and probably in the world).

    Finally I've found a notable source of inspiration on the ancient insularia, maps of the Middle Ages / Renaissance that displayed natural and human geography of the islands with a largely symbolical dimension.
    The cultural, litterary and artistical features of the islands will be largely presents in this zoo sketch.

    Stay tuned !
     
    Last edited: 13 Jan 2024
  2. Komodo Dragon

    Komodo Dragon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Jun 2022
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    91
    Location:
    United States
    Looking forward to this thread!
     
  3. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Hello,

    welcome to my first spec zoo for this year.

    The project of january is themed on islands, a very interesting theme as you will read later.

    Here's the general map of the zoo :
    [​IMG]
    Colour code :
    • medium green : enclosures / outdoor exhibits (with sometimes little ponds, not represented on the map)
    • blue : water bodies
    • red : animal houses
    • purple : non-animal buildings
    • yellow : Antarctic pavilion
    • dark green : Australasian greenhouse
    • sand : paths
    • light green : lawns
    After the entrance building (at the extreme left, where there are the pay booths, a souvenir shop and a café), the visitor can see the first exhibits of the zoo, dedicated to the islands of Northern Europe (Britain, Ireland, Iceland... and various islets off the coasts of Northern/Western countries of Europe).

    The first exhibit is a large round lagoon (1) of 3.000 m², whose layout mimics a port and a lighthouse, inhabited by Harbor Seals Phoca vitulina (3.4).
    This is an iconic and attractive species, also representative of North Atlantic wildlife.
    There are daily feeding sessions that are popular among the visitors.
    In the centre of the exhibit there's a stripe of land (sand, rocks) where the seals can sunbathe and rest.
    There are glass panels that offer an underwater view of the animals and a platform that allow a sight from above.

    Seal pool :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @RonBurrgundy )

    Harbor Seal :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Coelacanth18 )

    Aside the Seal pool, a netted aviary (2) of 200 m² displays two marine bird species, common along the coasts (and obviously, the islands) of Northern Europe : the Sandwich Tern Sterna sandvicensis (5.1) and the Black Guillemot Cepphus grylle (2.3).
    These birds live on a cliff with nesting places, a little sandy beach and a cold pool below. They are fed on fish every day.

    Seabird aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @vogelcommando )

    Sandwich Tern :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @geomorph )

    Black Guillemot :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @RatioTile )

    The seals and the seabirds can spend the night outdoors but there are special quarters in the nearby building (A) where some individuals can be isolated from the others for health or behavioral reasons.

    This building is also used as an aquarium with numerous tanks for fish and marine invertebrate species, some of them are quite unsung ; special devices like magnifying glasses and microscopes are put in front of the tanks dedicated to the smallest species (especially inverts). These species live around the European islands (extended to the Mediterranean and even Northern Africa for practical reasons).
    Here's a list of the tanks and of the displayed species :
    • Oaten Pipes Hydroid Tubularia indivisa (0.0.20)
    • Lesser Hornwrack Chartella papyracea (0.0.31)
    • Goose Barnacle Pollicipes sp. (0.0.77), Long-clawed Porcelain Crab Pisidia longicornis (0.0.10)
    • Lumpfish Cyclopterus lumpus (0.0.7)
    • Common Starfish Asterias rubens (0.0.4), Angular Crab Goneplax rhomboides (0.0.6)
    • Common Topknot Zeugopterus punctatus (0.0.3)
    • Damselfish Chromis chromis (0.0.9), Annular Sea Bream Diplodus annularis (0.0.2), Starlet Cushion Star Asterina gibbosa (0.0.4)
    • Pink Coryphella Edmundsella pedata (0.0.2)
    • Bryozoan Retepora grimaldii (0.0.7), Date Shell Lithophaga lithophaga (0.0.5), Greek Keyhole Limpet Diodora graeca (0.0.71), Common Limpet Patella vulgata (0.0.10)
    • Sea Cucumber Cucumaria sp. (0.0.3)
    • Sea Anemone Calliactis parasitica (0.0.9)
    Example of tank for marine life :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @KevinB )

    Goose Barnacles :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Maguari )

    Lumpfish :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @RatioTile )

    Common Starfish :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Kakapo )

    Annular Sea Bream :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @vogelcommando )

    The visit of the aquarium isn't over. There are further sections for other species that I'll describe later !

    Stay tuned !
     
    Last edited: 17 Jan 2024
  4. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Hello,

    now the visitor continues its visit through the European aquarium through a tunnel shaped like a ruined Greek temple with pillars and statues, that remind the Greco-Roman legends and the myth of Atlantis.

    Here there are several tanks, first a subtropical one with Squirrelfish Holocentrus adscensionis (0.0.7), Ark Shell Senilia senilis (0.0.33) and Giant Tun Tonna galea (0.0.6).
    These species are at least occasionnally present in the Mediterranean, except the Ark Shell that lives only along Atlantic African coasts.

    Then a large tank without any layout hosts a single species : the Salp Salpa sp. (0.0.91), a pelagic tunicate seldom displayed in public aquaria.
    This tank used to display other species as various jellyfish and small fish like anchovies in the past.

    Salps :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Hix )

    Then there's an unique Abyssal Tank in a completely dark room. The visitor has to wait a few minutes to catch a glimpse of its unique dwellers : the Sloane's Viperfish Chauliodus sloani (0.0.9) and the Sea Urchin Calveriosoma hystrix (0.0.20).

    The visitor concludes its trip into the Aquarium with a hatchery section, that currently hosts 0.0.17 juvenile Lumpfish (notice that the eggs of this fish are commonly eaten as a substitute for caviar ; there's signage about the sustainable use of fisheries, and the role of captive breeding in the fishing policies). A last tank hosts a migratory fish species, both coastal and riverine, the European River Lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis (0.0.8).

    Out of the Aquarium, there's now a large natural-like lagoon of 9.000 m² (3), on the model of the Seal pool previously described. The pool is quite shallow (max. : 2,5 m depth) and isn't delimitated by concrete walls but with gentle slopes ; in a few places there are glass panels to allow the underwater sighting of the cetaceans.
    There's a feeding platform where keepers can go to throw fish to the animals.

    Largely inspired by the pools of the Dolfinarium Harderwijk, it houses North Atlantic Harbour Porpoises Phocoena phocoena (3.7).
    This pod, sourced from rescued animals, is breeding, 2.0 young being born here in 2023.

    I precise that I'm not really fond of captive cetaceans, because of the common standards that imply concrete pools and circus-like shows. The lawmakers, supported by the animal activists but also a large proportion of the population, plan to phase out theses species in the short term in many countries including mine.
    But I think there's opportunity for the maintaining of rescued cetaceans (I must add that currently hundreds of dead small cetaceans are found stranded on the coasts of France, probably victims of fishing nets, prompting cases in the courts). In this context the presence of facilities for rescued cetaceans (as it exists already for Seals and Marine Turtles, that is commonly accepted by the public) and research on captive maintaining of this animals is a necessity.
    The permanent maintaining (and even breeding) of rescued - but unreleasable - animals should be allowed for educational purposes, even if the "true" shows would be banned.
    Here the Harderwijk Dolfinarium is a rare model at European (but probably global) level.

    Porpoise Lagoon :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @snowleopard )

    Harbour Porpoise :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Kakapo )

    On a lawn near the porpoise pool there are benches disposed on the ground (B) where the people can look at the animals, especially during the feeding sessions when there are talks about cetacean biology and conservation.

    Then a 1.000 m² grassy plain (4) is the habitat of a typical Nordic bird species, the Greylag Goose Anser anser (4.8).
    Obviously it's a common species and the exhibit may be replaced by another one, maybe dedicated to wading birds, in the future.

    Greylag Goose :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @KevinB )

    A 700 m² aviary (5) fenced with narrow netting displays various passerines that belong to Northern Europe avifauna : Fieldfares Turdus pilaris (6.5), Crested Tits Lophophanes cristatus (3.8) and Snow Buntings Plectrophenax nivalis (9.10). The layout presents various forested (pine and firs) and barren, tundra-like, habitats.
    1.5 Snow Buntings hatched in 2023 in this aviary.

    Fieldfare :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Vision )

    Snow Bunting :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Pleistohorse )

    The Northern sections concludes with a 150 m² aviary (6) that displays the first bird of prey of the collection : the Merlin Falco columbarius (2.2).
    This aviary is 2,5 m high and is quite basical for raptors, with a soil made of mulch, a few perches, nest boxes and shelters. Nonetheless it displays a species that isn't really common within European zoos.

    Falcon aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @KevinB )

    Merlin :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Great Argus )

    Next stop : Asia !
     
  5. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Hello,

    today we come into the Asian part of the Island Zoo, beginning with a 3.000 m² forested enclosure (7) with Sika Deer Cervus nippon (4.9). This animal is an emblematic species of Japan, even if subspecies live in continental Eastern Asia too.
    The enclosure, that has a simple layout, is fenced with wooden barriers.

    Sika Deer enclosure :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @lintworm )

    Sika Deer :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Veno )

    Near the Sika enclosure there's a Japanese pagoda called Kagoshima Pagoda (C), that is only decorative. A traditional Japanese garden has been made aside it.

    Japanese Pagoda :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @akasha )

    Japanese garden :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @akasha )

    We continue the visit towards numerous exhibits dedicated to tropical Asian islands.

    First there's a forested 1.200 m² island (8) that offers the main habitat for a trio of Siamangs Symphalangus syndactylus (1.2), composed of a pair and their young daughter.
    The natural trees are completed with artificial climbing structures (wooden towers, ropes...).
    These animals can be hard to spot among the lush vegetation, except during the feeding sessions when they come on the ground near the banks.

    Siamang island :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @ZooNerd )

    Siamang :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Green_mamba )

    300 m² pit with many trees and climbing structures (9), that is the home of Binturongs Arctictis binturong (2.0), a strange carnivore that lives (among other countries) in the Philippines and Indonesia.
    The two animals displayed there are young brothers.

    Binturong enclosure :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @MagpieGoose )

    Binturong :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @pendraig_milnerae )

    The daily sessions of Siamang/Binturong feeding are completed with talks about wildlife in South-Eastern Asian islands, the main conservation issues and the projects supported by the Zoo in Borneo and the Philippines.

    A smaller enclosure (10) has a surface of 100 m² and is filled with a lush vegetation.
    It is the habitat of Prevost's Squirrels Callosciurus prevostii (2.2) that may be quite difficult to see if you don't wait more thant 2 or 3 minutes.

    Prevost's Squirrels' exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @SivatheriumGuy )

    Then a long building (D) is dedicated to various small to medium-sized mammals from the islands of South-Eastern Asia.

    The visitor can see the night/winter quarters of the Siamangs and Prevost's Squirrels, then more unusual dark enclosures for two nocturnal species : the Philippine Tarsier Carlito syrichta (1.3) and the Malayan Slow Loris Nycticebus coucang (0.2).
    0.1 Philippine Tarsier is born in 2023 in this pavilion.

    Siamang indoor exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Astrotom3000 )

    Prevost's Squirrels' night quarters :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @pachyderm pro )

    Prevost's Squirrel :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Kalaw )

    Tarsier exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Zooish )

    Philippine Tarsier :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @alexkant )

    Slow Loris exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Nadchew_ )

    Malayan Slow Loris :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Giant Eland )

    Now the visitor can see a large plain of 2 ha (11) that is the home of the largest species of the Zoo, and obviously a very popular animal among the visitors : the Sri Lankan Elephant Elephas maximus maximus (3.3).
    The enclosure may be divided in two parts of 1 ha each to separate the bulls and the cows ; there's also a large pool that may be used by the elephants during the hottest days : it is also the home of Red-crested Pochards Netta rufina (7.2).
    Siamangs have a partial access to the Elephant enclosure through rope bridges.
    The presence of other animals offers a behavioral enrichment to the pachyderms.
    Special corridors link the enclosures to the night building (E).
    This one is divided in many boxes and an inside paddock with a pool : these installations can be seen by the visitors along the visiting path throw large glass panels.

    I add that there's signage about the place of the Elephants in the Hindu and Buddhist beliefs, and statues of the divinity Ganesh are placed along the enclosure.
    There are also panels about the conservation projects in Sri Lanka (mainly about mitigation of human/wildlife conflicts, and prevention of forest cutting and poaching) that are supported by the Zoo.

    Asian Elephants' enclosure :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Green_mamba )

    Asian Elephant night quarters (indoor paddock) :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @twilighter )

    Sri Lankan Elephant :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Zoofan15 )

    Red-crested Pochards :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    Next I'll describe the remainder of this rich Asian zone.

    Stay tuned !
     
  6. Gibbonsagainstgravity

    Gibbonsagainstgravity Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    18 Aug 2023
    Posts:
    159
    Location:
    New York
    This is really cool! Looking forward to the rest of the Asian section!
     
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  7. Tigeanderson

    Tigeanderson Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    2 May 2023
    Posts:
    124
    Location:
    Eatontown Monmouth County New Jersey
    I really like this section of your zoo but the only thing I would change is that if it was my zoo which I know it’s not I would a section that would be dedicated to animals of the Hebrides, The Shetland and Orkney islands and the surrounding waters and animals in this section would include the grey Seal, the Scottish red deer which have a population on the island of rum which is part of the inner Hebrides, The Soay Sheep, Shetland Pony, European river otter which live in the waters of the Shetland islands, Puffin, Northern Ganett, Orkney vole, Goldsinny, rockcook and Corkwing Wrasses, Haddock, two spotted goby, small spotted catshark, sea stickleback, Atlantic Cod and a big tank for the basking shark.
     
    iloveyourzoos, Osedax and Haliaeetus like this.
  8. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Thank you for you idea @Tigeanderson , I will probably make a map of Pan-European spec zoo, with obviously a section dedicated to Scotland and to the isles/sea around (minus the Basking Sharks, that seem to be very hard to keep in captivity, if it was ever attempted).

    It's now the time to continue the visit of the Asian part of my island zoo.

    Near the Elephant plain there's a pavilion called Suvarnadvipa (E).
    Without animals, this pavilion is named over one of the ancient names of the island of Sri Lanka (one of the numerous names of this island, as the French novelist Jules Verne reported in his time) or Sumatra : there are various claims over the exact place of this legendary island, like an Oriental version of Atlantis.
    The name has a rich history, with its original Sanskrit meaning "the colourful island", that is, through the Persian word Serendip, at the origin of the word serendipity (a discovery provoked by the chance), that may summarize well the sense of the word "island" as a concept.
    This pavilion is entirely dedicated to the rich symbolism of the islands across the world in the mythologies, litterature and science in a crossed approach.

    Near this pavilion there's a 2-m high small aviary of 100 m² (13) with dense vegetation, that houses Brown Boobook Ninox scutulata (0.2), a species that is currently unique in European zoos.

    Brown Boobook aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @KevinB )

    Brown Boobook :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Ding Lingwei )

    Near this aviary there are two very high aviaries (5-m high) of 120 m² each, that are dedicated to large hornbills.

    The first (14) is the home of Rhinoceros Hornbill Buceros rhinoceros (1.0).
    The male is single but the Zoo searches for a female to pair with him.
    The Zoo supports a conservation and monitoring program of large hornbills (including the Rhinoceros Hornbill), as well as the realization of nest boxes for them, in the Bornean rainforest.

    Rhinoceros Hornbill aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @gulogulogulo )

    Rhinoceros Hornbill :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Julio C Castro )

    The second houses the Wreathed Hornbill Rhyticeros undulatus (0.2), the two females housed are sisters from the same clutch.

    Wreathed Hornbill aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @aardvark250 )

    Wreathed Hornbill :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @vogelcommando )

    After South Asia, we head slowly towards the Pacific and Oceania, with a very large Australasian section, whose first exhibits house a large array of tropical species.

    There's first the Indonesian Greenhouse (F), that has a surface of 4.000 m² and a height of 12 m.
    The visitors can walk inside this house among various tropical plants ; the layout is completed with ponds, a waterfall and artificial rocks. Many feeders are disposed inside the house for the numerous free-flying birds that inhabit the pavilion.
    The visiting path includes sections at the ground level and several meters above in the canopy, up to 7 meters.

    The bird collection of the pavilion is huge (many doves, parrots, songbirds...) and includes currently the following species, most of them living in the Indonesian islands and New Guinea :
    • Pied Heron Egretta picata (3.3)
    • Bar-shouldered Dove Geopelia humeralis (0.1)
    • Green Imperial-Pigeon Ducula aenea (3.0)
    • Black-chinned Fruit Dove Ramphiculus leclancheri (1.5)
    • Red-breasted Pygmy Parrot Micropsitta bruijnii (3.4)
    • Dusky Lory Pseudeos fuscata (3.4)
    • Double-eyed Fig Parrot Cyclopsitta diophthalma (5.2)
    • Javan Broadbill Eurylaimus javanicus (2.8)
    • Green Broadbill Calyptomena viridis (7.1)
    • Banded Pitta Hydrornis guajanus (3.2)
    • Asiatic Paradise-Flycatcher Terpsiphone paradisi (2.8)
    • Java Sparrow Padda oryzivora (6.6)
    • Red Avadavat Amandava amandava (5.1)
    • White-shouldered Triller Lalage sueurii (2.1)
    • Greater Racket-tailed Drongo Dicrurus paradiseus (5.3)
    • Purple-throated Sunbird Leptocoma sperata (1.1)
    Many breeding successes have been recorded in this greenhouse : in 2023 we had 2.2 Pied Herons, 1.2 Javan Broadbills, 4.0 Green Broadbills, 1.2 Asiatic Paradise-Flycatchers and 4.0 Red Avadavats.

    Bird House :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    Pied Heron :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @OskarGC )

    Bar-shouldered Dove :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @WhistlingKite24 )

    Green Imperial-Pigeon :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Kaelio )

    Black-chinned Fruit Dove :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @TeaLovingDave )

    Dusky Lory :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Zooish )

    Double-eyed Fig Parrot :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Hix )

    Javan Broadbill :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @ronnienl )

    Green Broadbill :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    Banded Pitta :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Tomek )

    Asiatic Paradise-Flycatcher :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Chlidonias )

    Red Avadavats :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @gentle lemur )

    Greater Racket-tailed Drongo :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @TheoV )

    Purple-throated Sunbird :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Chlidonias )

    The visit of the Indonesian House isn't over ; I'll describe soon other exhibits in this building, besides the birds.

    Stay tuned !
     
    Last edited: 23 Jan 2024
  9. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member 10+ year member

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2013
    Posts:
    3,469
    Location:
    Baltic Sea - no more
    You missed a great educational opportunity in regard to elephants and island biology.
     
    Last edited: 23 Jan 2024
    Haliaeetus and Van Beal like this.
  10. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Yes @Batto it's a good point, I've missed it because I remained in the South Asian theme.
    But it reminds me a paper chase game about extinct species that took place in Beauval last year, there were replicas of extinct relatives of species displayed in the zoo, including the Sicilian Dwarf Elephant near the African Elephant enclosure.

    Earlier this day I said that the description of the Indonesian Greenhouse wasn't over.

    Indeed there's signage into the greenhouse about the Wallace's and Weber's lines that make the biogeographical boundary between Indo-Malayan and Australasian realms, with a whole interpenetration zone where there's a mix of both faunas like in Sulawesi (including for example marsupials and monkeys on the same island).

    Otherwise, there's a false cave in the greenhouse, where there are many aquaria and aquaterraria, holding the following herp and fish species :
    • Javan Filesnake Acrochordus javanicus (0.1)
    • Gold-ringed Cat Snake Boiga dendrophila (2.0), Sumatran Halfbeak Dermogenys sumatrana (0.0.87)
    • Pig-nosed Turtle Carettochelys insculpta (0.2), Cherry Barb Rohanella titteya (0.0.60)
    • Carpet Python Morelia spilota (1.0)
    Some of these species don't share the same habitat nor country, but most of them represent some of the adaptations of the Indo-Malayan and Australasian species to various environments.

    Javan Filesnakes' aquarium :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Chlidonias )

    Javan Filesnake :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Zooish )

    Gold-ringed Cat Snake exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @MagpieGoose )

    Gold-ringed Cat Snake :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Chlidonias )

    Sumatran Halfbeak :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @vogelcommando )

    Pig-nosed Turtle exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @WhistlingKite24 )

    Pig-nosed Turtle :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @WhistlingKite24 )

    Cherry Barb :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @vogelcommando )

    Carpet Python exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Mr.Weasel )

    Carpet Python :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @WhistlingKite24 )

    Out of the Indonesian Greenhouse, the visitor can see the first Oceanian species in various exhibits.

    The first of them is a 1.000 m² lawn (16) with a small pond.
    It's the habitat of a flock of Hawaiian Geese Branta sandvicensis (4.4), a species that has been saved from extinction in the recent decades.

    Hawaiian Goose exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Hvedekorn )

    Hawaiian Goose :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @splendens )

    The following enclosures host two less-known species, that are also our first marsupial species.
    Both are flat and grassy, with a little tree coverage and bushes, and a net over them to prevent the presence of predators, especially crows and birds of prey. They host New Guinean (not Australian) wallaby species, that may quite hard to spot.

    The first (17) has a surface of 1.200 m² and hosts some Dorcopsis Dorcopsis sp. of undetermined species (3.2).

    Dorcopsis exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @snowleopard )

    The second (18) is smaller (800 m²) and is the home of Dusky Pademelons Thylogale brunii (5.4).

    Dusky Pademelon enclosure :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @gulogulogulo )

    Dusky Pademelon :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Fallax )

    Before the Pacific Aquarium (that I will describe later) there's a 400 m² and 8-m high aviary (19) with a cliff and a pool.
    It is the home of two tropical marine bird species, uncommon within zoos :
    • White Tern Gygis alba (1.3)
    • Red-billed Tropicbird Phaethon aethereus (3.3)
    These birds have managed to breed here ; in 2023 0.1 White Tern hatched and fledged in this aviary.

    White Tern :
    [​IMG]
    (Credit : @Hix )

    Red-billed Tropicbird :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @AWP )

    The next step will be the Pacific Aquarium.

    Stay tuned !
     
  11. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    We are now in the Pacific Aquarium (G), a 2.000 m² building with Maori-style decorations, and signage about the natural and human history of the tropical Pacific islands.

    In the entrance lobby there's a shallow tidal pool inhabited by 2 strange species : the Fiddler Crab Austruca annulipes (0.0.44) and the Shortnose Batfish Ogcocephalus nasutus (0.0.6).
    This tank has a surface of 6 x 3 m ; it is very shallow (maximum depth of 50 cm) and the half of the surface is occupied by a sand bank where the crabs make their burrows.

    Shortnose (Walking) Batfishes :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @jayjds2 )

    The second pool represents a rocky coastal habitat, with an equal surface but a much more important depth (2 m).
    Here we can see the following species : Long-spine Porcupinefish Diodon holocanthus (0.0.8), Titan Triggerfish Balistoides viridescens (0.0.4), Trumpet Emperor Lethrinus miniatus (0.0.4), Savigny's Brittle Star Ophiactis savignyi (0.0.97).

    Long-spined Porcupinefish :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Coelacanth18 )

    Titan Triggerfish :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @vogelcommando )

    Then the visitor can see some tanks dedicated to coral reef species, most of them belonging to the fish realm, first a smaller tank of 2 x 2 x 2 meters with Threespot Dascyllus Dascyllus trimaculatus (0.0.7), Sebae Clownfish Amphiprion sebae (0.0.7), Mandarinfish Synchiropus splendidus (0.0.9), Razorfish Aeoliscus strigatus (0.0.2), Auger Snail Terebra subulata (0.0.7).

    Small Tropical Fish Tank :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @geomorph )

    Threespot Dascyllus :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @vogelcommando )

    Mandarinfish :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    Razorfish :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Lucas Lang )

    There's also an hatchery tank of 90 cm x 60 cm x 30 cm, where it's possible to see currently 0.0.18 Threespot Dascyllus (juveniles that hatched here from local spawn).

    Another reef tank of 3 x 2 x 2 meters houses Yellow Longnose Butterflyfish Forcipiger flavissimus (0.0.2) and Blue Surgeonfish Acanthurus leucosternon (0.0.6), two coral reef species commonly kept in aquaria.

    Reef Tank :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @SusScrofa )

    Yellow Longnose Butterflyfish :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @DaLilFishie )

    Blue Surgeonfish :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    The following tank is a pelagic one with a sandy bottom, with a surface of 5 x 3 m, that is inhabited by Slender Bamboo Sharks Chiloscyllium indicum (3.0).

    Then the visitor can see the largest tank of the building, with a surface of 400 m² and a depth of 8 m, that can be seen from the ground level and from above using stairs and two platforms.
    The bottom is mainly sandy, with a wreck and a rocky sector with holes and caves.

    In this enormous tank it is possible to see the following species : Giant Oceanic Manta Ray Mobula birostris (0.2), Whitetip Reef Shark Triaenodon obesus (2.0), Blue-barred Parrotfish Scarus ghobban (0.0.10).

    Shark and Ray tank :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Zooish )

    Giant Oceanic Manta Ray :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Therabu )

    Whitetip Reef Shark :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Prochilodus246 )

    Blue-barred Parrotfish :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @devilfish )

    The visitor has the access to a (sustainable) seafood restaurant and to a little souvenir shop on the upper level of the building.

    In the following steps of the visit I'll describe the properly Oceanian section of the zoo.

    Stay in touch !
     
  12. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member 10+ year member

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2013
    Posts:
    3,469
    Location:
    Baltic Sea - no more
    Then you could have used dwarf stegodons like Stegodon sondaari or Stegodon florensis insularis instead.;)
     
  13. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Yes it's a good idea. Curiously these biological phenomena remind me Gulliver's Travels, one of my favourite books. I still wonder if this writer was aware of the island nanism (and gigantism).

    Now the visitor can enter into a building designated for Autralasian nocturnal wildlife (H).

    First three enclosures of 20 m² each offer the possibility to see in the twilight mammalian species for the islets around Australia, where they are at least present if it aren't their last refuges.
    The role that the small islands can play in the conservation of rare wildlife is highlighted here.
    The soil is primarily sandy, with stumps and other hides for the animals.

    These enclosures display now the following species :
    • Australian Swamp Rat Rattus lutreolus (5.2)
    • Long-nosed Potoroo Potorous tridactylus (3.2)
    • Banded Hare-Wallaby Lagostrophus fasciatus (2.0)
    Nocturnal mammals' exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @snowleopard )

    Long-nosed Potoroo :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @WhistlingKite24 )

    Banded Hare-wallaby :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Najade )

    The very last two exhibits are larger (50 m² each), conceived with ponds and a sandy bank with burrows, various plants and stumps. The fencing is made of large glass panels with underwater vision along the pool.
    They are the habitats for the Platypus Ornithorhynchus anatinus (2.2), a species native to Tasmania (and minor islets around Australia), that is iconic as well as extremely rare in zoos out of Australasia.
    Each enclosure hosts a pair of this unique oviparous mammal.

    Platypus exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Gibbonsagainstgravity )

    Platypus :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Zoofan15 )

    Next to the building there are two 120 m² exhibits (20-21), that are the home of Southern Brown Kiwi Apteryx australis (1.2).
    The soil is sandy, with a few shrubs and bushes, and hides for these strange New Zealander birds.

    Kiwi aviaries :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @KevinB )

    Southern Brown Kiwi :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @zooboy28 )

    The following enclosure (22) is a 3.000 m² grassy plain with some trees, a wooden fence and a small pond, that is the home of a couple of mammalian and avian species that live in Australia, New Zealand and in some islands around :
    • Brolga Antigone rubicunda (1.1)
    • Parma Wallaby Notamacropus parma (1.2)
    • Paradise Shelduck Tadorna variegata (3.3)
    The strange story of the Parma Wallaby is related here : this species was presumed extinct for many decades... until its rediscovery on an island off New Zealand coast, where it was reintroduced (then its presence was reconfirmed in mainland Australia).

    Brolga and Wallaby enclosure :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Chlidonias )

    Brolga :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Therabu )

    Parma Wallaby :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Ituri )

    Paradise Shelduck :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Cassidy Casuar )

    On a side of the building there's a long enclosure of 300 m² (23), whose soil is made of mulch and sand, with stumps and large burrows. The animals can also go into the building but their quarters are off-show.
    This enclosure houses the Naked-nosed Wombat Vombatus ursinus (1.1), a burrowing mammal that represents another side of the Tasmanian mammalian life.

    Wombat enclosure :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @WhistlingKite24 )

    Naked-nosed Wombat :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Therabu )

    Then there's a round aviary of 250 m² and 2,5 m high (24) for one bird of prey species : the Australian Kestrel Falco cenchroides (1.1), present in Australia and New Guinea.

    Australian Kestrel aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Dhole dude )

    Australian Kestrel :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @WhistlingKite24 )

    The next exhibit is a long enclosure of 400 m² (25) with a pool, and a bank with a grassy slope, pebbles and burrows.
    Along the enclosure the fence is made of steel with viewing platforms, and glass panels that offer underwater views.
    It is the habitat of the first penguin species of the Zoo, the Little Penguin Eudyptula minor (3.4).
    These penguins haven't yet bred here, but that is hoped for the coming years.

    Little Penguins' enclosure :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Chlidonias )

    Little Penguin :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @DaLilFishie )

    There are daily feeding sessions for the penguins, that are popular among the guests.

    I will soon end the Australasian part of the Zoo, that is without a doubt one of the most interesting parts for the quality of the exhibits and the species displayed (but many other parts that I'll describe later could rival with it...).

    Stay in touch !
     
  14. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member 10+ year member

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2013
    Posts:
    3,469
    Location:
    Baltic Sea - no more
    Given that both Baron Franz Nopsca von Felsö-Szilvás [why this guy's life story hasn't been turned into a HBO/Netflix series yet is beyond me...] and Bristol Foster published their theories regarding island biology way past the publication of Gulliver's Travels in 1726, I doubt that...
     
  15. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Hello,

    the visit of the Australasian section of the zoo is nearly concluding, with a row of three aviaries (26-27-28).

    The two first aviaries are larger (200 m² each) and 4-m high, with an open layout that recreates a semi-arid landscape with a sandy, drained soil, a few trunks and perches, plus shelters for the ground-living species.

    The first one (26) houses a New Guinean native, the Pesquet's Parrot Psittrichas fulgidus (0.2).

    Pesquet's Parrots' aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @gulogulogulo )

    Pesquet's Parrot :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Jakub )

    In the second aviary there's a mix of two Australian species (also presents in small islands around this country) : the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus banksii (1.1) and the Malleefowl Leipoa ocellata (1.0).

    Cockatoo / Malleefowl aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Philipine eagle )

    Red-tailed Black Cockatoo :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    Malleefowl :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @WhistlingKite24 )

    The third aviary (28) is still high (4 m) but much smaller, and filled with dense vegetation.
    It is inhabited by Princess Stephanie's Astrapia Astrapia stephaniae (0.1), the sole Bird-of-Paradise species to be present in this collection.
    Once a pair was present but currently only the female remains, it isn't clear if she will be joined by a male or not.

    Bird-of-paradise aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @KevinB )

    The Australasian section is now over.

    The visitor walks towards the next section, dedicated to Madagascar and Indian Ocean islands.

    The first enclosure (12) is a 2.000 m² grassy plain. It was primarily placed in the Asian section, but it makes also sense for a Malagasy complex, because it houses Zebu Bos primigenius f. taurus (4.3), a cattle type that is common in Madagascar, where it plays an important cultural role.

    Zebu plain :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Otorongo )

    Zebu :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Otorongo )

    After this introduction, the visitor can see a large complex of aviaries called Berenty, decorated with traditional artefacts.

    It begins with a netted bird aviary (29) of 500 m², with a pool and an island with trees in the middle.
    There are nesting platforms on the tree tops.

    Here we can see Hamerkops Scopus umbretta (4.2) and (as a proxy for Madagascar Sacred Ibis) African Sacred Ibises Threskiornis aethiopicus (4.4).

    Berenty Ibis aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Kalaw )

    Hamerkop :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @GiraffeJack10 )

    African Sacred Ibises :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    The second aviary (30) is larger (700 m²) and partially concealed by wooden palisades and vegetation (bamboo, shrubs).

    It is the home of a bird of prey species : the Madagascar Harrier Hawk Polyboroides radiatus (2.1), with a pair and a juvenile that hatched in 2023.

    Harrier Hawk aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @KevinB )

    Madagascar Harrier Hawk :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Therabu )

    The thirs exhibit (31) has a surface of 700 m² and displays a mix of two very rare primate species : the Indri Indri indri (0.2) and the Diademed Sifaka Propithecus diadema (4.0), all these animals have been seized by the customs.

    Indri and Sifaka habitat :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @twilighter )

    Indris :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Therabu )

    Diademed Sifaka :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Therabu )

    There's also a large walkthrough forested enclosure of 3.500 m² (32) entirely dedicated to another rare lemur species : the Verreaux's Sifaka Propithecus verreauxi (8.4). Wooden fences separate the visiting walkway (that is sometimes at the ground level and sometimes above) from the remainder of the aviary, entirely dedicated to the primates that could retire in heated quarters at night or when the weather is too cold (in this case the access to the exhibit is closed).
    There are also feeding places, that are quite distant from the path.
    So the visitors could see the Sifakas in near-natural conditions.
    Talks are proposed to the visitors every day in weekends and holidays, about the challenges on conservation in Madagascar and the conservation actions (afforestation, monitoring of the lemur colonies, prevention of wildlife crime) that are supported by the Zoo.
    One can notice that all the Malagasy exhibits of the zoo don't display the most common lemur species like Ring-tailed or Ruffed Lemurs.

    Along the Verreaux's Sifaka enclosure there's a small grassy enclosure of 100 m² (33) delimitated by a wooden and mesh fence, where it's possible to see Radiated Tortoises Astrochelys radiata (9.5) when the weather is warm enough.

    Outdoor enclosure for Radiated Tortoises :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    Radiated Tortoise :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    The visitor comes out of the Berenty complex, and sees at its right a 200 m² grassy enclosure (34) that is made on the model of the previous enclosure.
    It is the habitat of one of the most spectacular species of Indian Ocean islands : the Aldabra Giant Tortoise Aldabrachelys gigantea (2.1), present when the air temperature is over 15°C.

    Aldabra Giant Tortoises' outdoor enclosure :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    Aldabra Giant Tortoises :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )
     
  16. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Both tortoise species have night/winter shelters, where they can be seen by the visitor behind glass windows (I).
    These quarters are four 15 m² boxes (two for each species, the males and females being separated) and heated by lamps.

    Tortoises' night shelter :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    There's now the end of the Malagasy section of the Island Zoo.
    The next steps will be dedicated to Antarctica and to the Americas, their description will be released soon...

    Stay in touch !
     
  17. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Hello,

    today I'll introduce the New World section of the Island spec zoo.

    The first exhibit (35) is an island of 3.000 m² with rocky sectors, a wooden hut and a path across the slopes, that is used as a petting zoo called Robinson's Paradise.
    Rustic style wooden fences prevent the visitors against the parts of the exhibit that may be hazardous for the children (and grown-ups too).
    Around the hut there's a playground with jungle gym, that mimics the universe of Robinson Crusoe.

    The animals are represented by a single species : the Juan Fernandez Island Goat Capra aegagrus f. hircus (4.6), that belong to a feral caprine breed genuinely introduced on the Juan Fernandez Archipelago, the place where Alexander Selkirk, the adventurer who inspired the literary character of Robinson Crusoe, lived for several years.
    Here there's also signage about the issues linked with introductions of exotic species in island environments, and the eradication campaigns that may happen to restore these places.

    Then there's a section dedicated to the subantarctic islands, some of them lying near South American coasts (Falklands, South Georgia...).

    A large lagoon of 6.000 m² (36) that encompasses two coves, a strait and rocky islands and shores is the habitat of a species that is currently absent from European zoos and the second pinniped species of the facility : the Southern Elephant Seal Mirounga leonina (5.0).
    The five impressive males displayed here have been rescued as stranded young animals.

    Outdoor view of the Elephant Seal exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Neil chace )

    Southern Elephant Seal :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @lintworm )

    A polar building called Antarctica (J) offers an underwater view to the Elephant Seal pools :

    Elephant Seal pool :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @TinoPup )

    It isn't the sole species to be housed here.

    Inside the Antarctic building there's an entirely indoor, refrigerated, enclosure of 300 m² with a large pool, rocky shores, a beach covered with pebbles, and large glass panels offering an underwater view (like for most the marine species displayed here).

    This exhibit is the home of Adélie Penguins Pygoscelis adeliae (3.5).
    The Penguin group is composed of three breeding pairs and 2 juvenile females.
    Last year 1.5 Adélie Penguins hatched (each pair bred), the male and 3 females have been sent in other parks when they became independent from their parents.

    Adélie Penguin exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @carlos55 )

    Adélie Penguin :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @red river hog )

    A smaller aviary of 100 m² (38), separated in two sections of 50 m², is the habitat of a third species : the Falkland Steamerduck Tachyeres brachypterus (1.2).
    It's a netted aviary with a fresh pool, a sandy beach and a few burrow-like shelters.
    The first aviary houses the male, the second the females. Both aviaries can be linked for pairing purposes.

    Steamerduck aviary :[​IMG]
    (Credits : @Maguari )

    Falkland Steamerducks :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @gentle lemur )

    The next complex may be one of the most unrealistic exhibits of this zoo, given the theme and the amount of extremely rare species that are unlikely to be seen in European zoos (or in any zoo out of South America).
    It is dedicated to the unique Galapagos Islands.

    The main enclosure (39) has a surface of 5.000 m².
    It is a very large netted aviary over a steep, rocky landscape, including an island.
    The vegetation mimics the species of the semi-arid environments of the Galapagos archipelago.
    To mimic the typical geology of the Galapagos, the rocks have been brought from Auvergne, a volcanic region in the Centre of France.
    This aviary is crossed by paths, that allow the visitor to see many species native from this archipelago, some of them already breeding here.
    Finally there are an abundant signage and daily talks about the uniqueness of this archipelago for the speciation process, the history of science (we may think to the famous expedition of Charles Darwin) and the current conservation challenges and the progresses that have been achieved.

    The current species collection includes the following species (all of them free-ranging across the exhibit) :
    • Galapagos Penguin Spheniscus mendiculus (4.7)
    • Red-footed Booby Sula sula (1.6)
    • Blue-footed Booby Sula nebouxii (6.5)
    • Flightless Cormorant Nannopterum harrisi (3.0)
    • Lava Heron Butorides sundevalli (7.4)
    • Galapagos Hawk Buteo galapagoensis (1.1)
    In 2023 the Zoo has welcomed the births of 1.0 Blue-footed Booby, 0.2 Lava Herons and 0.2 Galapagos Hawks (the latter sent back to the Galapagos after fledgling).

    Galapagos trail :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : TheImmigrant1 )

    Red-footed Booby :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @RatioTile )

    Blue-footed Boobies :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @AWP )

    Lava Heron :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Dom )

    Galapagos Hawks :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @King of Komodo Dragons )

    On a side of the Galapagos complex, there's an additional enclosure of 300 m² (40) that is the summer exhibit of the Marine Iguanas Amblyrhynchus cristatus (1.5), that have a pool and, behind it, a rocky beach (with lava rocks from Auvergne) where they can sunbathe and caves with heated lamps where they can retire.
    The fencing is made of a low rocky wall and glass panels for the underwater view of the swimming iguanas.

    Marine Iguana :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @jayjds2 )

    Immediately after the Galapagos zone there's a modest Caribbean section with only a 150 m² enclosure (41) with a few trees and climbing gear, and a small pool, home of Crab-eating Raccoons Procyon cancrivorus (4.1).

    Crab-eating Raccoons' enclosure :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Philipine eagle )

    Crab-eating Raccoons :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Moorhunhe )

    Near the Raccoons' enclosure there's a small restaurant called The Pirate's Lair (K), where the visitors can eat in a tropical atmosphere.

    A walkthrough aviary of 1.000 m² (42) displays some bird species of the mangrove and other coastal habitats of the Caribbean and the extreme Southern coasts of the US.

    This aviary is covered with a 8-m high net, and planted with many trees.
    Some nesting platforms have been built on the trees.
    Additionally there are several ponds in the aviary.
    The path is made of a wooden walkway that rambles across the aviary.

    Here we can see the following species :
    • Roseate Spoonbill Ajaja ajaja (6.4)
    • Little Blue Heron Egretta caerulea (3.3)
    • Snail Kite Rostrhamus sociabilis (2.0)
    • Baltimore Oriole Icterus galbula (0.3)
    Inside this aviary there's also a small pen used as the summer habitat of Common Box Turtles Terrapene carolina (2.1).

    Wetland walkthrough aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @German Zoo World )

    Roseate Spoonbill :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Haliaeetus )

    Little Blue Heron :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @red river hog )

    Snail Kite :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Newzooboy )

    Baltimore Oriole :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @vogelcommando )

    The visit is nearly over, with an handful of exhibits (a vivarium and a few aviaries) remaining.

    In the coming posts I will describe the final sections of my Island zoo.

    Stay tuned !
     
    Last edited: 3 Feb 2024
  18. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2021
    Posts:
    2,216
    Location:
    Orléans, France
    Now the visitor enters a double-decked building, used as a vivarium for many herps, invertebrates and a few other taxa (L). This vivarium is inspirated on similar pavilions in Jersey Zoo and in the Ménagerie du Jardin des Plantes, it holds only small to medium-sized animals.
    Most of them come from the islands of Indian Ocean, the Mediterranean, Africa and even Arabic peninsula ; there are also a couple of species from other islands. Some of there are mainly continental species, but also present (native or introduced) in one or more islands.
    In this place there's signage about island endemism, and the conservation of these unique places.

    After each species I'll indicate the island(s) of origin of each species displayed :
    • Fernand's Skink Lepidothyris fernandi (3.1), from Bioko Island (Equatorial Guinea)
    • Ornate Day Gecko Phelsuma ornata (4.5), from Mauritius
    • Blue-tailed Day Gecko Phelsuma cepediana (2.2), from Mauritius
    • African Common Toad Sclerophrys regularis (2.1), introduced in Cape Verde islands
    • Desert Hedgehog Paraechinus aethiopicus (0.1), present in Bahrain, Djerba and Tanb (Persian Gulf islet)
    • Great Green Bush-Cricket Tettigonia viridissima (0.0.23), present in Corsica and other Mediterranean islands
    • Grasshopper Oedipoda sp. (0.0.38), present in European and Mediterrenean islands (many species)
    • Monarch Butterfly Danaus plexippus (0.0.60), primarily American but present (native or introduced) in the Caribbean, Oceania, Canary islands, Réunion, Mauritius...
    • Little Brown Skink Scincella lateralis (4.2), present on the islets off the coast of Florida
    • Cuban Tree Frog Osteopilus septentrionalis (0.5), from Cuba, the Bahamas and Cayman Islands, introduced (and considered invasive) in Florida (a rare case of an island animal that became invasive on mainland)
    • Japanese Fire-bellied Newt Cynops pyrrhogaster (0.4), from Japan
    There's also a terrarium for juvenile Common Box Turtles Terrapene carolina (3.2) and Little Brown Skink Scincella lateralis (0.1) that hatched in 2023, and the wintering enclosure of the adults previously described, as well as the winter exhibit of the Marine Iguanas.

    Here's the gallery of the species displayed :

    Fernand's Skinks' exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @gulogulogulo )

    Fernand's Skink :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @gentle lemur )

    Day Geckos' exhibits :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Jordan-Jaguar97 )

    African Common Toad :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Batto )

    Desert Hedgehog :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Giant Eland )

    Great Green Bush-Cricket :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @KevinB )

    Monarch Butterfly :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @OkapiFan )

    Cuban Tree Frog exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @StoppableSan )

    Cuban Tree Frog :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @gulogulogulo )

    Japanese Fire-bellied Newts' exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @akasha )

    Japanese Fire-bellied Newts :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @akasha )

    Common Box Turtles' exhibit :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @geomorph )

    Common Box Turtle :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @CMP )

    The Island vivarium holds also an off-exhibit part that is used for breeding purposes.

    The visit of this Insularia Zoo ends with a Mediterranean complex of three mesh aviaries (44-45-46) that hold birds of prey that belong to threatened species with small and fragile populations on islands like Sardinia and Sicily.

    These aviaries have a surface of 150 to 200 m² each. They are 8-m high, with limited layout (only a few perches, a feeding place and nesting platforms) and hold the following species :
    • 44) 200 m² : Bonelli's Eagle Aquila fasciata (1.0)
    • 45) 150 m² : Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus (1.0)
    • 46) 175 m² : Egyptian Vulture Neophron percnopterus (1.1)
    The Bonelli's Eagle is currently single, but the Zoo searches for a mate for future breeding.
    The bird present in the exhibit n° 45) is a juvenile that hatched in 2023, from the pair displayed in the exhibit n° 46. He's eligible for a further reintroduction in the wild in the coming years.

    Bonelli's Eagle :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Rhino00 )

    Egyptian Vultures' aviary :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Chapman'szebra )

    Egyptian Vulture :
    [​IMG]
    (Credits : @Gavial )

    There's the end of the visit of the Insularia Zoo (the definitive name of my first speculative park for 2024).

    I hope you have enjoyed it, and you have found that the idea, the species collection and the layout were inspiring.

    For the month of February I'll unveil a new project : the Jungle Dome.

    Stay in touch !
     
  19. Gibbonsagainstgravity

    Gibbonsagainstgravity Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    18 Aug 2023
    Posts:
    159
    Location:
    New York
    Truly Amazing work!
     
    Haliaeetus likes this.
  20. Dr. Loxodonta

    Dr. Loxodonta Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    31 Dec 2023
    Posts:
    193
    Location:
    U.K
    What an amazing Speculative Zoo to start 2024 with @Haliaeetus! I just can’t wait for your next one, “the Jungle Dome”!
     
    Osedax, Van Beal and Haliaeetus like this.