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My zoo designs and projects

Discussion in 'Speculative Zoo Design and Planning' started by MizzB, 29 Nov 2021.

  1. MizzB

    MizzB Well-Known Member

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    Hello! I decided to make this thread so I have a place to post my project designs for fake zoos I often make. I’m looking for criticism too, as I’m no where near perfect, as well as my designs. I want to know if these would work or be possible in a real life zoo mostly. This thread may go inactive for a while for some times, it means I’m probably working on some projects of mine. Tomorrow I’ll post my first design here! It’s gonna be a huge zoo, so expect a lot of posts.

    (I’m pretty sure this is alright in this forum, super sorry if it’s against the rules :))
     
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  2. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, put it this way - the more detail and effort you put into the design, the more likely it is to be *precisely* what we want this refocused sub-forum to contain :) so this is a good thing, and not something you need to apologise for in the slightest.

    And we *definitely* want discussion and criticism!
     
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  3. MizzB

    MizzB Well-Known Member

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    Alright, time for the first post of a zoo I’m working on, called Golden Stag Zoological Gardens.


    You first enter through a standard entrance, though if you take time to look at it, you see it’s quite nice looking. it has classic white walls, but there is plenty of fake ivies and other vine-like plants covering them. It also has paintings of random zoo animals, such as orangutans, chimpanzees, giraffes, lions, and other well known animals. The building has an orange/brown brick roof. Near the roof, there’s a sign that says “Golden Stag Zoological Gardens” below it says “Have a wonderful time!” The sign is on either side of the building. Getting away from the entrance. There’s a grey concrete path that leads to the right; taking the path, you end up in a small area with plenty of restaurants, gift shops, bars, and more. A few notable names are:


    “Tiger Treat”

    “Jewel’s Diner”

    “The Butterflies Tulip”

    “The Shining Brewery”

    “Macaw Eatery”


    The looks of the shops are definitely eye-catching. With bright colors and shining glass from every one of them.


    The Tiger Treat is tiger-themed, with a growling tiger by the name. Jewel’s Diner is gold and inside the restaurant has jewels embedded in the counter where you order your food. The Butterflies Tulip is a simple bar, but with butterfly feeders, so the guests could watch the butterflies land and catch a quick meal of nectar. The Shining Brewery isn’t very interesting from the outside, nor is the inside. It’s just something plain, not matching the other buildings. Lastly, the Macaw Eatery, like the Tiger Treat, is macaw-themed, with flying macaws by the name and also by the windows. That’s just a few of the buildings, there’s a lot more lined up as well.



    Once you get a bite to eat/drink or when you’re simply done viewing the restaurants and such, you can head over to the first exhibit. To get to the exhibit, you just walk on another concrete path, which is on the left. After walking a short distance, you reach an open-top aviary that holds 5.8 American Flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber)


    The exhibit has a large pond in the middle, with rocks lining the edge. The pond also has floating plants covering the top, such as Common Duckweed (Lemna minor). Other plants are widespread across the exhibit, like reeds and long grasses. Info signs show where the animals live, eat, and generally do in their spare time. The signs also compare the different types of flamingo species and how to identify them correctly. For the fencing, it’s a mix between wooden and wire. The posts for support are wooden, then there’s wire, then wood again at the top.


    The path wraps around the entire exhibit, so guests can get amazing views. The next exhibit guests see is multiple rectangle-sized aviaries. They all contain unique birds of prey, including not well-known ones. The first one contains 1.1 Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus). It’s not the most unique, and a more common species. It was chosen for its incredible speeds, which can total up to 200 mph! The aviary has logs and branches in the middle, as well as noticeable perches on the ground and mounted up onto the walls. On the ground, there’s a mix of gravel and sands, with grasses and other vegetation growing. The aviary itself is mostly wooden, with planks on the side, then mesh in the middle for viewing.


    The next aviary, which shape and size are almost identical to the first one, along with the same fencing. It holds 1.1 Harris’s Hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus), a beautiful yet smart species of hawk. The exhibit design is about the same as the falcon’s, just bigger. The aviary features more rocks, and plants too. There are also more perches/branches on the ground. There are also planks of wood for the hawks to land on if they don’t feel like perching.


    Next is the biggest aviary, which also has a small, off-show house at the back. It houses 1.1 Steller’s Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus pelagicus). The aviary has lush underbrush, with plenty of different types of grass covering the ground. There is also many perches on the ground, along with a few small trees. The off-show house, has dirt-covered ground, with more perches and wooden shelves like the Harris’s Hawk. Arguably, the Steller’s Sea Eagles aviary is most prettiest of all of the aviaries, but they’re all amazing in their own ways.


    The last aviary, which contains 1.1 Spectacled Owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata). The aviary is lush, with some bushes and a few trees in the middle. It has a dirt ground with vines and branches for perches. The owls also have a small house in the back, which is off-show as well. The house is often used when it’s the day, posing a slight problem for the guests to see them, but it’s mostly for the animals’ welfare and comfort.

    so, what do guys think? Anything I can improve? I’m looking for criticism, so don’t be afraid to state your opinion!
     
  4. Bengal Tiger

    Bengal Tiger Well-Known Member

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    Really nice!!! Very detailed an fun to read. I like the careful detail into the exhibits, keep it up!!!
     
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  5. MizzB

    MizzB Well-Known Member

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    Here’s the next part!

    After you get done viewing the birds of prey, you follow a path that takes a turn left, but also keeps going straight. there is also a sign that directs people to what area/animals they possibly want to see. The part of the sign that points left says “Primate House”. While the one that points straight says “Long-Legged Waders Aviary”. Along the sides of the paths are flower beds and trees, mostly for decoration and to keep the zoo looking nice and pretty. Anyways, we’ll be going down the straight path; to the waders aviary. When you reach the aviary, you can see it’s made out of mesh, with no wooden pieces. Inside is a beautiful, clear river that runs through the exhibit, with rocks and logs spaced out around it. It has multiple, large tropical plants and grasses too. There’s a waterfall in the back, with mosses growing all over it, as well as vines; to give it a more jungle theme. There are trees too, with long, lush leaves. In the river, guests can see live fish swimming around, which is supposed to be an enrichment; for the waders. The aviary contains 2.4 Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber), 2.5 Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja), 4.6 Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis), and 1.5 Ringed Teal (Callonetta leucophrys). The bird species should be peaceful and live together without any danger to each other. The birds also all live in South America, which was also a reason for the chosen species.


    After viewing, guests have a choice to continue and walk into the South America zone, with exotic animals, such as kinkajous, aye-ayes, tropical birds, and much more, or they can go back to the primate house if they didn’t before. We’ll head to the Primate House.


    Guests enter through an arch with the words “PRIMATE HOUSE” written on it. On the arch itself, is grey/white, with flower baskets hanging from hooks on the sides. Above the letters has a statue of a chimpanzee sitting, as well as an orangutan, and a gorilla on the sides of the chimp. There are lines of flower beds and trees along the sides, slightly blocking the view of the guests if they look to the side. When they reach the building, it has the same color walls as the arch, as well as the flowers. On the top, there are stacks of walls then the roof, probably for trees so they have space. On the very top, there are glass panels on the top and walls, allowing light to shine through. There are multiple drawings and paintings secured to the walls that show different species of apes, monkeys, and other strange primate species, such as lemurs and galagos. There’s a high concrete fence on the sides, preventing guests from straying from the path.


    When guests get inside through a door that has “PRIMATE HOUSE” written on it like the arch. There are dim lights hidden on the walls, lighting up the house. To the right are restrooms, then to the left are restaurants and gift shops, in case someone is hungry, needs to go to the bathroom, etc. guests walk through a spacious corridor, with exhibits with glass panels for viewing on the sides. The first exhibit holds 1.3 Ring-Tailed Lemur (Lemur catta) and 1.3 Red Ruffed Lemur (Varecia rubra) Their exhibit has dull, grey floors and roofs, with wooden climbing structures in the middle, with posts leading down to concrete shelves for the lemurs to sit and sleep on. There is also an abundance of hay/straw on the ground and the shelves for padding. On the sides, there are multiple doors with stairs leading up to them. The doors are opened and closed at different times of the day. Most of the doors lead to their off-show outdoor exhibit, filled with lush plants. The lemurs also have an off-show indoor area, and the door that leads to it is always opened, it’s also where the lemurs get fed sometimes.


    The next exhibit also has lemurs, but it holds 1.3 Black-And-White Ruffed Lemur (Varecia variegata). Their exhibit is identical to the other lemur’s house, of course, some things are different, such as the climbing structures. Above the guests, there’s a metal tunnel with mesh for viewing, this transports the lemurs to either exhibit, as they sometimes switched around.


    The guests continue down the hall, shortly greeted by more exhibits on both sides. The first exhibit contains 2.5 Tufted Capuchin (Sapajus apella). The monkeys have taller climbing structures than the lemurs, as well as a few potted plants and mulch just to make it more interesting for the guests. They also have off-show outdoor exhibits. Noticeable things in the exhibit other than the structures and plants are toys, such as complex boxes with treats inside to test the monkeys and their intelligence. The lemurs also have these boxes, but different colors and different ways to get the treats inside. The treats are often pieces of sweet and tasty fruits, but sometimes a biscuit or two.


    The next exhibit contains 1.4 Black-Handed Spider Monkey (Ateles geoffroyi). Their exhibit is like the capuchin’s, but they don’t have the potted plants or mulch, instead, there are vines and ivies. The vines are attached to the climbing structures and to the wall, making sure they won’t fall down if the spider monkeys climb on them. The monkeys also have the puzzles that the rest do, making sure they have enrichment.


    I tried to make this post not as long, but there’s still a lot :)
    Tomorrow I’ll be posting the rest of the Primate House, as well as some of the South America zone! Also, do you guys see anything I could add to the exhibits? I tried to go all out for what I could come up with, so I hope it’s good enough!
     
  6. Austin the Sengi

    Austin the Sengi Well-Known Member

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    I think that along with a few other primates that are somewhat common in zoos, such as Mandrills, Tamarins, Gibbons, Howler Monkeys, and a few other notable species. I would also recommend adding in a few rare species into the mix, just to help spice things up a bit. Maybe some non-Madagascan prosimians such as Pottos, Galagos, and Lorises could work out just fine. But other than that, this project of yours has certainly been one of my favorites that I have seen from you so far, definitely keep up the good work my friend; can’t wait to see more of what you have in store.
     
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  7. Haliaeetus

    Haliaeetus Well-Known Member

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    @MizzB have you a map of your zoo?
    It would be easier to visualize your masterplan.

    Otherwise the collection is nice, perhaps with too many common species, especially if your zoo is supposed to be huge.
     
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  8. MizzB

    MizzB Well-Known Member

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    Not yet, no. I’m currently working on one, though! I’ll most likely post it after I finish the zoo, as I’m still developing and planning how’d the exhibits work. And for the common species, I’m going to attempt to balance it out in the future. In my next post tomorrow, when I’ll finish the Primate House, I’m most likely gonna add some rarer species of primates. In the South America zone, I’m gonna aim for rarer species, mostly birds. Otherwise, I do agree that there a quite a few common species so far.
     
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  9. Bengal Tiger

    Bengal Tiger Well-Known Member

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    Small mammals are always nice addition.
     
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