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National Aviary National Aviary Updates

Discussion in 'United States' started by TigerValley98, 25 Mar 2012.

  1. TigerValley98

    TigerValley98 Well-Known Member

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    From the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review:
    ________________________________________________

    Newly hatched penguin chicks pack personality

    By Chris Togneri, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
    Sunday, March 25, 2012


    Little Guy's tiny black eyelids grew heavy after his 11th smelt. Big brother Tribby managed to gulp down 16 of the small fish before he, too, conked out in his handler's lap.

    "Oh, yeah, he's out," said Chris Gaus, lead penguin trainer at the National Aviary in the North Side, as Tribby's head fell on his chest. "All right, buddy. Back to bed."

    The aviary welcomed two new family members: a pair of African penguins hatched here last month.

    Trib Total Media, which sponsors the aviary's Penguin Point exhibition, won naming rights for Tribby, hatched Feb. 26. The second, unnamed chick emerged from his egg on Feb. 29; aviary staff for now call him Little Guy.

    The first penguin chicks to hatch at the aviary, they already show personality, said Steve Sarro, director of animal programs.

    "They're both a little feisty -- a little attitude, and very inquisitive," Sarro said. "Tribby is very calm. The second one is a little bit younger, and he's just trying to figure out what's going on."

    Tribby and Little Guy spent three weeks with mom, Bette, and dad, Sidney, named for Pittsburgh Penguins captain Sidney Crosby. The babies live in a cooling incubator in Sarro's office, where staff members hand-feed them three times a day.

    "It's always a blast hand-raising chicks," Sarro said. "We have them sit on our laps; we have people come over and interact with them. That helps them (learn) their job in education, to be an ambassador for the wild."

    The global wild breeding penguin population has dwindled to fewer than 50,000, down from about 1 million less than a century ago, Sarro said. The birds are considered an endangered species.

    Several factors are killing penguins, including oil pollution, commercial over-fishing, human disturbance and climate change, Sarro said. Some researchers predict that unless changes occur, wild penguins will die off completely in 15 years, he said.

    "We're very good at breeding them in captivity," Sarro said. "But they should be in the wild."

    Trib Total Media's chief operating officer, Jennifer Bertetto, an aviary board member, said the company wanted to get involved with Penguin Point -- and with Tribby -- because it believes in the aviary's message of "conservation and education."

    People can see the newborns for the first time on Friday night during a ticketed event at the aviary. Starting March 31, they will appear at Penguin Point twice daily, at 11 a.m and 2:30 p.m. They'll enter the exhibit permanently at the end of summer.

    The chicks weigh about 2 pounds each, and likely will triple or quadruple that weight.

    They're still a bit unsteady. Adults stand on their legs and tuck their wings into their sides, but Tribby and Little Guy can manage only brief waddling before collapsing onto crumpled wings.

    Newly hatched penguin chicks pack personality - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
     
  2. TigerValley98

    TigerValley98 Well-Known Member

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    Aviary plans to breed at-risk species

    Aviary plans to breed at-risk species

    By Bill Zlatos
    Tribune-Review


    Published: Tuesday, April 24, 2012, 6:48 p.m.
    Updated 5 hours ago


    The National Aviary in Pittsburgh has hatched a plan to help conserve some of the rarest birds in the world.

    "We want to make sure as much as possible that we have these species represented so we can educate the public about the challenges the species face, breeding those species as much as possible and also looking at the health care issues they face," Pat Mangus, executive director of the aviary, said on Tuesday.

    "The goal is to ensure these populations are represented in the wild as well as in zoos for generations to come," he said.

    Aviary officials presented a five-year plan to the Allegheny Regional Asset District Board yesterday that makes conservation through the breeding of rare species a key goal. The aviary on the North Side houses more than 500 birds representing at least 150 species.

    One rare species the aviary would like to get is the cock-of-the-rock, a bird that lives in South America. The males have brilliant reddish-orange plumes.

    "They're a flagship species of the rain forest, and visually they're stunning," said Steve Sarro, director of animal collections for the aviary.

    The aviary would breed South African penguins, Guam rails and Andean condors -- all species it has.

    The number of South African penguins has declined from overfishing of their food source; humans' use of guano as fertilizer but which penguins use to cushion their eggs; and global climate change. The third factor forces the penguins to swim farther out to sea to hunt, making them more vulnerable to predators.

    Mangus said Guam rails were decimated from Micronesia during World War II when brown tree snakes arrived in the wells of planes. The snakes had no natural predators, but conservation groups are trying to rid them from some islands.

    The rails "got to the point where they were extinct in the wild," he said. "We are breeding Guam rails that are being sent back to the islands."

    Mangus said the aviary is working with the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium to breed Andean condors. The condors would live at the zoo's International Conservation Center in Somerset County and then be released to their home turf in South America.

    Numbers of condors dwindled because of the use of DDT, a pesticide that thins the egg shells of birds.

    Education is another thrust of the aviary's new strategic plan. It is holding a seminar on May 11-12 with the Rachel Carson Institute at Chatham University titled "Silent Spring at 50." The book by the late environmentalist Carson, a Springdale native, led to the ban of DDT.

    Mangus said the plan, approved by the aviary board last year, does not call for any more building. The aviary completed a $17.5 million renovation and expansion in 2010. That project included construction of the Helen M. Schmidt FliteZone Theater.

    Last year, 120,816 people visited the aviary, which seeks to increase paid attendance by 10 percent this year.

    Read more: | TribLIVE | Pittsburgh | TribLIVE | Pittsburgh
     
  3. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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    Update on the new Kiwi exhibit

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  4. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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    The National Avairy opened a new outdoor exhibit space, Condor Court, that provides a great new view of the birds.

    here is a pic of the cave there putting in the new kiwi exhibit. Im so excited cant wait to see him.

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  5. TigerValley98

    TigerValley98 Well-Known Member

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    National Aviary transforms garden into kids' play area

    Tuesday, May 08, 2012
    By Diana Nelson Jones, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


    The National Aviary has transformed a garden area between its Arch Street entrance and the condor display into a new interactive play space for children, thanks to a grant from the Colcom Foundation.

    Condor Court is a new landscaped area that incorporates the display of the Aviary's pair of Andean condors into daily talks about the enigmatic bird, said Patrick Mangus, executive director of the National Aviary.

    He said the children's area "was the final unlandscaped area we had, and we really felt we needed an area where kids could get out and be kids and interact with nature."

    "Condor Court will be our primary location for early learner programs and provide a space for parents and educators to begin introducing concepts of environment, recycling and the coexistence of people and animals in the natural spaces around us."

    The court includes a fountain that children can play in, activity tables with educational materials and bird feeders to attract wild birds from the surrounding Allegheny Commons Park.

    "One of the initial means of introducing kids to environmentalism is to help them understand the animals and plants that live around them," said National Aviary Director of Animal Programs Steve Sarro. "Attracting native bird species to Condor Court will provide opportunities to discuss the birds that live around us, how they differ from the more exotic species living within the Aviary, and the different environments in which the birds live."

    The aviary, at 700 Arch St., North Side, houses more than 800 birds from around the world.

    National Aviary transforms garden into kids' play area
     
  6. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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  7. TigerValley98

    TigerValley98 Well-Known Member

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  8. TigerValley98

    TigerValley98 Well-Known Member

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    Wings! remains, but once a day

    Wings! is remaining. It is scheduled for once a day. SkyDeck and Parrots of the Caribbean is twice a day. See the complete schedule at the link below.

    Come Visit the National Aviary


    See the new pricing structure at the link. The change is because of there are now three shows during the summer.

    Come Visit the National Aviary
     
  9. TigerValley98

    TigerValley98 Well-Known Member

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    Aviary plans to breed burrowing owl pair

    Aviary plans to breed burrowing owl pair

    June 22, 2012 12:02 am
    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


    The National Aviary in Pittsburgh has debuted a new exhibit to house a unique pair of owls whose populations are declining in the wild.

    The burrowing owls, native to the western U.S. and South America, have experienced loss of habitat, and the Aviary aims to create a space that resembles their natural environment and will encourage breeding.

    The burrowing owls live in dry, open areas with low vegetation. Rather than perch in trees, they nest in underground burrows. The new exhibit includes an underground burrow with a glass front so visitors can observe the pair.

    "We are hopeful the nature of this exhibit case, in that it resembles the owl's native environment, will be conductive to breeding, will provide visitors an understanding of the variety of bird nesting locations, and help visitors understand the impacts that habitat loss have on variety of animals," director of animal programs Steve Sarro said in a news release.

    These owls are part of the aviary's plan to ensure species' viability.

    The National Aviary at Allegheny Common West, 700 Arch St., houses more than 600 birds of over 200 different species, many rare or endangered, according to its website.


    Aviary plans to breed burrowing owl pair - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
     
  10. TigerValley98

    TigerValley98 Well-Known Member

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  11. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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  12. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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  13. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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    3 new birds of prey will be on exhibit in condor court starting this saturday. juvenile bald eagle, a snowy owl and a eurasian eagle owl.
     
  14. TigerValley98

    TigerValley98 Well-Known Member

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    National Aviary in Pittsburgh fires executive director

    By Rick Wills
    Published: Thursday, November 8, 2012, 2:56 p.m.
    Updated 12 hours ago


    The National Aviary’s trustees ousted its executive director over a “difference of opinion,” less than four years after the previous director resigned for much the same reason.

    Patrick T. Mangus Jr. headed the renowned bird zoo in the city’s North Side beginning in early 2009 when he replaced CEO Linda Dickerson. She stepped down during the first phase of a $23 million expansion.

    The decision to oust Mangus was made at a board meeting on Wednesday, said board president Anthony R. Bridge.

    “The board agreed that we should discontinue him. His services are no long needed at the aviary. There is a difference of opinion about how the aviary should be operated,” Bridge said. He would not elaborate, saying, “It would not be fair to him or to the aviary.”

    Mangus could not be reached for comment on Thursday.

    Bridge declined to answer questions about whether Mangus received severance pay. He earned $120,680 annually, according to charitynavigator.org.

    The board named chief operating officer Cheryl Tracy as the aviary’s interim executive director.

    The aviary’s website says its collection includes more than 600 birds of more 200 species from around the world. It operates on an annual budget of almost $3.9 million.

    Mangus, 63, joined the aviary in 2007 as chief operating officer. A graduate of Ohio University, he worked for many years in public relations, was a board member of the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden, and volunteered for Big Brothers Big Sisters.

    When Dickerson resigned, she raised concerns about the aviary board’s willingness to operate transparently, provide access for people with disabilities and promote diversity.

    At the time, Dickerson said she fought with the board to make a penguin exhibit accessible for people in wheelchairs. She cautioned that the aviary might need to scale back its expansion plan because of the weak economy.

    The aviary has roots in the late 19th century as part of Pittsburgh’s first plant conservatory. The city rebuilt it 1952. It’s one of the few zoos in the country to display birds in free-flight rooms.

    When city budget cuts threatened to close the institution in 1991, Save the Aviary Inc., a private nonprofit corporation, formed. It became a private entity in 1992. A year later, by declaration of Congress, the Pittsburgh Aviary earned honorary national status and changed its name to the National Aviary in Pittsburgh.

    National Aviary in Pittsburgh fires executive director | TribLIVE
     
  15. TigerValley98

    TigerValley98 Well-Known Member

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    National Aviary in Pittsburgh fires executive director

    National Aviary in Pittsburgh fires executive director

    By Rick Wills
    Published: Thursday, November 8, 2012, 2:56 p.m.
    Updated 12 hours ago


    The National Aviary’s trustees ousted its executive director over a “difference of opinion,” less than four years after the previous director resigned for much the same reason.

    Patrick T. Mangus Jr. headed the renowned bird zoo in the city’s North Side beginning in early 2009 when he replaced CEO Linda Dickerson. She stepped down during the first phase of a $23 million expansion.

    The decision to oust Mangus was made at a board meeting on Wednesday, said board president Anthony R. Bridge.

    “The board agreed that we should discontinue him. His services are no long needed at the aviary. There is a difference of opinion about how the aviary should be operated,” Bridge said. He would not elaborate, saying, “It would not be fair to him or to the aviary.”

    Mangus could not be reached for comment on Thursday.

    Bridge declined to answer questions about whether Mangus received severance pay. He earned $120,680 annually, according to charitynavigator.org.

    The board named chief operating officer Cheryl Tracy as the aviary’s interim executive director.

    The aviary’s website says its collection includes more than 600 birds of more 200 species from around the world. It operates on an annual budget of almost $3.9 million.

    Mangus, 63, joined the aviary in 2007 as chief operating officer. A graduate of Ohio University, he worked for many years in public relations, was a board member of the Pittsburgh Botanic Garden, and volunteered for Big Brothers Big Sisters.

    When Dickerson resigned, she raised concerns about the aviary board’s willingness to operate transparently, provide access for people with disabilities and promote diversity.

    At the time, Dickerson said she fought with the board to make a penguin exhibit accessible for people in wheelchairs. She cautioned that the aviary might need to scale back its expansion plan because of the weak economy.

    The aviary has roots in the late 19th century as part of Pittsburgh’s first plant conservatory. The city rebuilt it 1952. It’s one of the few zoos in the country to display birds in free-flight rooms.

    When city budget cuts threatened to close the institution in 1991, Save the Aviary Inc., a private nonprofit corporation, formed. It became a private entity in 1992. A year later, by declaration of Congress, the Pittsburgh Aviary earned honorary national status and changed its name to the National Aviary in Pittsburgh.

    National Aviary in Pittsburgh fires executive director | TribLIVE
     
  16. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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    Recently White-cheeked Turaco chicks hatched in the Tropical Forest.
     
  17. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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    Went to the aviary after work for a few hours. 4 updates
    1) Burrowing owls had babies.
    2) The dome bubbles for kids to look out into the penguin exhibit is back open again. the crawl tunnel was closed for awhile for renovation. one of the acrylic panels was leaking.
    3) The aviary will present 2 new shows opening memorial day weekend.
    4)I know this might be strange but The aviary will exhibit a species of bat soon. They will share an exhibit with a species of cockatoo back by the new kiwi exhibit.
     
  18. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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    A baby Eurasian Eagle Owl recently hatched in Condor Court.
     
  19. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    Notes on the Eurasian Eagle owl :
    Eurasian Eagle Owl Hatched at National Aviary

    Owl hero

    On March 13 this Eurasian Eagle Owl hatched at Pittsburgh's National Aviary, the only one of its species hatched at any AZA facility in the past five years. The newly-hatched chick weighed 49.5 grams to start and has developed beautifully, doubling in size in just five days. By one month of age she was standing, walking and stretching her wings, as well as beginning public appearances to serve as an ambassador for her species. DNA testing of the egg verified what the measurements predicted: the owl is a female.

    The bird’s parents, named X and Dumbledore, serve as education birds, trained to free fly in shows and perch on a glove for group programs. On September 25, during X's break from performing, she was placed in an exhibit adjacent to Dumbledore for a two-month howdy period. They were introduced, and breeding behaviors were seen within six weeks of pairing. A total of three eggs were laid every other day, the first on February 7. Shortly before hatching, the fertile egg was removed from the nest to complete incubation for hand-rearing. Click HERE to read all the details of the fascinating hatching and rearing process.

    Owl side

    Owl perch

    Photo Credit: National Aviary

    Eurasian Eagle-owls are the largest species of owl in the world and are found in North Africa, Europe, Asia and Middle East. Females, on average, are one third larger than the male. Males weigh 4- 5 ½ pounds, while a larger female can weigh close to 7 pounds. Their height ranges from 2 to 2 ½ feet tall, with a wingspan of approximately 5 ½ feet.

    See the owl on it's first TV show. Story and pictures continue after the jump:

    The first television outing for the owlette was an appearance on Pittsburgh Today Live, where it perched for the first time. The baby did a great job educating people about the species, but all the activity brought on a little nap.
    Source : Zooborns
     
  20. jusko88

    jusko88 Well-Known Member

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    Stopped by the aviary this morning for a quick visit and got some updates.
    1) the male Andean condor passed away but the female Andean condor will be back on exhibit this summer in condor court.
    2)They got another spangled Cotinga and there trying to breed the female and male at the breeding center.
    3)There's plans on shipping out there single Red-legged Seriema and there recently hatched baby Eurasian Eagle Owl to another facility.
    4) the aviary received two Abdim's Stork and will be in a new bird show coming in the fall.
    5) The Tropical Rainforest section is more open now and new plants were plotted for re- growth.