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New Salamander Fungus Found: Chytrid-Like Effects!

Discussion in 'Wildlife & Nature Conservation' started by findi, 6 Nov 2014.

  1. findi

    findi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 Mar 2011
    Posts:
    171
    Location:
    NYC USA
    Hi, Frank Indiviglio here. I’m a herpetologist, zoologist, and book author, recently retired from a career spent at several zoos, aquariums, and museums, including over 20 years with the Bronx Zoo
    As a herpetologist and animal keeper, I’ve long been interested in the emerging amphibian disease commonly known as Chytrid or BD (Batrachochytrium dendrobatitis); please see my other articles, linked below. Believed to be responsible for the recent extinctions of over 200 frog species, this fungus remains a serious threat. In 2013, a related fungus, B. salamandrivorans, or BS, was identified. Since then, studies have revealed it to be as lethal as BD, and responsible for wiping-out the Netherlands wild Fire Salamanders. Once limited to Asian salamanders, some of which carry the fungus without becoming ill, BS seems to have found its way to Europe via the importation of Chinese Fire-Bellied Newts and other pet trade species. In order to stem the tide, the USA and the European Union are now considering import and sale regulations. Read the rest of this article here New Salamander Fungus Found: Are More Pet Trade Regulations on the Way?
    Please also check out my posts on Twitter http://bitly.com/JP27Nj and Facebook http://on.fb.me/KckP1m

    My Bio, with photos of animals I’ve been lucky enough to work with: That Pet Place Welcomes Frank Indiviglio | That Reptile Blog

    Best Regards, Frank
     
  2. dean

    dean Well-Known Member

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    25 Aug 2012
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    707
    Location:
    North Essex.
    Hi Frank
    As far as I'm concerned anything that kills animals, but especially amphibs for me is a disaster, but this sounds like another attack on people who keep exotics, including zoo's. When the connection was first made, over 2000 newts were tested for the pet trade, in the EU, Hongkong and USA none showed the fungus, but 3 in museums did. I don't know which museums though.

    I was watching the TV series Monsoon yesterday, and the film crew handled all sorts of creatures and walked through mud and rain in all the nations of the monsoon region around Asia including Australia, I wonder what microbes they transported on their clothes and footwear, even camera equipment. Then there is the trade in frogs legs to consider,and eco holidays, student gasp year volunteers working in remote places the list goes on and on for the bacterias and fungus spores of the world to hitch a ride.:(
     
  3. findi

    findi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    17 Mar 2011
    Posts:
    171
    Location:
    NYC USA
    Hi Dean, Thanks..all the factors you list are important, but unfortunately the related fungus in frogs is proving difficult to understand/control despite a great deal of time and research, etc. Import bans will almost certainly be imposed (US) if the fungus is suspected in animals to be shipped here, as it has not yet beed documented as occurring in N America, and so many frogs have been lost to the related species...I'll provide updates, best, Frank