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Niue has a duck. But just one.

Discussion in 'Niue' started by Chlidonias, 8 Sep 2018.

  1. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    A lone Mallard has appeared on Niue, although no-one knows how it got there or where it came from. The locals are feeding the duck, and maintaining a puddle for it to live in because the island has no natural ground-water.

    The loneliest duck in Niue
     
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  2. Daktari JG

    Daktari JG Well-Known Member

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    LOL Trevor appears to be a Teresa
     
  3. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    It is a male Mallard.
     
  4. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    It will add something for Niue's bird watchers. Niue only has 19 bird species, so...
     
  5. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    Where did you get 19 from? There are 15 breeding species on the island, and then the migrant waders and non-breeding seabirds. Leaving aside the vagrants (like this Mallard) there are somewhere between 30 and 40 species available to be seen there.
     
  6. Daktari JG

    Daktari JG Well-Known Member

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    My eyes ain't what they used to be. It looked all brown to me but on second look with enough squinting it is a male
     
  7. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    There are better photos on other news articles.
     
  8. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    Maybe not the most reliable source of information, but I counted the species on this page:

    List of birds of Niue - Wikipedia

    The eBird data was a bit spotty, but I only got 15 there. I figured that if there were more bird species, more would have been reported.

    https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2018&bmo=1&emo=12&r=NU

    *It is worth noting that the Wikipedia article states that 29 bird species may be found in Niue. The eBird checklist states 34. But keep in mind this includes accidentals and vagrants.

    *Also note that isn't the only duck on Niue. After looking over Niue's Mallard reports on eBird, I found this statement:

     
  9. TZDugong

    TZDugong Well-Known Member

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    Surely introduced and vagrant birds count as birds on the island? Just because it’s rare or accidental doesn’t mean that it’s a bird you can’t find, it’s just harder.
     
  10. birdsandbats

    birdsandbats Well-Known Member

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    I am counting introduced species here. I am not counting vagrants because I was referring to commonly occurring species - of which there are only 20. If you are counting vagrants (such as this Mallard), the count would be around 30 - still not many bird species.
     
  11. Chlidonias

    Chlidonias Moderator Staff Member

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    The Wikipedia article is missing a lot of seabirds, as also the eBird must be (I haven't looked at it). And it is (most probably) the only duck currently on Niue - Grey Ducks being found there as vagrants doesn't mean there are Grey Ducks there now.

    There is only one introduced species (chickens). If counting all birds recorded on the island - including vagrants - the total is around 50, not 30, because (as per above) your "sources" are missing numerous recorded seabirds (terns and petrels), many of which are frequent.
     
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