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No Pronghorn OutSide America?!

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by Gforrestersmith, 23 Sep 2011.

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  1. ungulate nerd

    ungulate nerd Well-Known Member

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    Stjarna, it turns out that you are correct, they are still around ??????????? ? ????
     
  2. Nanook

    Nanook Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely. I think there are actually quite a few of these more "highly strung" ungulates that can be rather problematic to keep in a conventional zoo situation, examples such as Impala, Springbok etc.. , and climate has proved to be an important consideration in the past in keeping species such as the Saiga for example, I would imagine the Tibetan Antelope would also fit into this category, and as discussed the Pronghorn too.
    I think many of these species are perhaps more suited to a larger open area,
    certainly altitude is an important factor for some. Those species which have a strong flight reaction are very hard to physically contain or manage too closely without risking injury and an early death.
     
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  3. condor

    condor Well-Known Member

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    I may be wrong, but I don't think the plans have been officially scrapped. It was still a part of the masterplan in early 2013 at least. However, several things have happened at the zoo recently, including a big change in management. I doubt we'll see the realization of the North American section anytime soon, if at all. According to the plans, it was supposed to include the majority of the larger mammal species found in the United States; several of these are already housed elsewhere in Tierpark Berlin (but not pronghorns, of course). The section is supposed to be built next to the Eurasian section, which itself houses an impressive selection of ungulates.
     
  4. tschandler71

    tschandler71 Well-Known Member

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    Condor do you know what species are in that master plan? I am just curious. It seems like outside North America the typical view of American megafauna is of the Boreal animals (much like Savannah animals dominate the view of African megafauna to Americans). So were there species like Black Bear, Whitetail, Cougar, Bobcat going to be included or just the standard "yellowstone" fauna?
     
  5. TeaLovingDave

    TeaLovingDave Moderator Staff Member

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    Tierpark Berlin already holds all of the species you cite, with the exception of the Whitetailed Deer.
     
  6. Ituri

    Ituri Well-Known Member

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    FYI all those species you list also occur in Yellowstone. ;)
     
  7. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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    Did some research on Zootierliste for historical dates from Europe :
    Tierpark Berlin 1969 - 1972
    Berlin Zoo 1902 - 1937 ( with breaks )
    Frankfurt 1936 - 1937
    Hamburg Zoo ( NOT Hagenbeck ) 1887
    Hannover 1936 11 young animals imported ( transported by a zeppelin !!! ), partly given to other zoos ( Frankfurt and Berlin Zoo )
    1961 1.2 imported + 3.0 later after the ( castrated ) male died, 1966 first German breeding result, 1973 last animal died.
    Antwerp Zoo no further information
    Copenhagen around 1953
    Vincennes Paris 2 breeding results in the 1960-ties - 1961 European first breeding and 1964
    Rotterdam ( old zoo ) 1874
    Whipesnade 1964 - 1966 UK-first breeding 1964
    London Zoo 1865 1.0 and 1884 1.1 ( <--- these last ones not mentioned in Zootierliste )
    Askaniya Nova no further information
     
  8. tschandler71

    tschandler71 Well-Known Member

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    yes they do hence why I had it in quotes. Even in North America the exhibits that focus on American Megafauna focus on the boreal species over the temperate ones. Possibly because of Bergman's Rule.
     
  9. gerenuk

    gerenuk Well-Known Member

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    But Yellowstone doesn't have any boreal forests. Its predominantly temperate coniferous, montane, and temperate grasslands.
     
  10. jbnbsn99

    jbnbsn99 Well-Known Member

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    Really? I've never once seen a boreal North American exhibit.