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Olm-breeding

Discussion in 'Slovenia' started by vogelcommando, 8 Feb 2016.

  1. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  2. gentle lemur

    gentle lemur Well-Known Member

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    Cool :cool: and dark too of course.
    Good luck to them.

    Alan
     
  3. kiang

    kiang Well-Known Member

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  4. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  5. MikeG

    MikeG Well-Known Member

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    From today's BBC website:

    After a four-month wait, the eggs laid by a peculiar salamander in a Slovenian cave have started to hatch.
    Ghostly pale and totally blind, olms - fondly known by locals as "baby dragons" - only reproduce every 5-10 years and are thought to live to 100.

    This clutch of eggs started to appear in January in an aquarium in Postojna Cave, a tourist destination where the creatures have lived for millennia.
    Observing baby olms develop and hatch is a rare opportunity for science.
    The first of 23 developed eggs hatched on 30 May; a second baby olm was slowly wriggling out of its egg on Wednesday night.
    "It is the end of one part of the story and the beginning of a whole new chapter: feeding and living without the egg," said Saso Weldt, who looks after and studies the olms at Postojna Cave.

    He told BBC News nobody witnessed the first egg hatching, but the moment was captured thanks to an infrared camera.
    "I was in the cave doing some other biological work. Since we have all the eggs on an IR camera, we saw that one was missing. Then you rewind and suddenly you realise, something has happened."
    Mr Weldt and his colleagues hope to see a full count of 23 healthy hatchlings within a few weeks.

    The staff at Postojna have been consulting amphibian experts to help them care for the fragile eggs, including a French team that has studied the olms in an underground mountain lab since the 1950s.
    That laboratory is the only other place where these animals have ever been observed emerging from their eggs.
    "In the cave, in nature, they hatch all the time - but nobody here has ever seen a hatchling younger than about two years," Mr Weldt said.

    This clutch of eggs, which has captivated the Slovenian public, was laid by a single female over a period of several weeks.
    "We did not do a paternity test, so we cannot know if it was a single father or not. But it was one mother," Mr Weldt said. "She's with our colony of proteus and she's doing well."
    The eggs have been kept in a separate enclosure and watched very closely.
    Originally there were 64, but only 23 embryos developed. The rest of the eggs were unfertilised and decayed, or were lost to fungal infections in the water.
    "It's quite normal - the losses are expected," said Mr Weldt. In fact, the baby dragons' odds would likely be much worse in the wild. "In nature, out of 500 eggs let's say, two adults may arrive."
     
  6. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  7. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  8. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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