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Once in zoos but now extinct

Discussion in 'General Zoo Discussion' started by nanoboy, 19 Sep 2012.

  1. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    Its been discussed somewhere on here before but I can't remember the outcome, however I'm presuming that the original White rhino pair at ZSL- 'Ben' and 'Bebe' were both Northerns (then regarded as a subspecies or race). I remember vaguely seeing them in the old Cattle Sheds. 'Ben' of course lived to go into the Casson building with his 2nd (Southern) mate where he was such a familiar sight I never took any special notice of him. Of course, although its nowadays deemed a 'good' species, the Northern is so similiar (virtually identical) to its Southern counterpart it doesn't IMO have quite the cachet of other more inidividualistic species.
     
  2. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Indeed London Zoo’s original white rhinos, ‘Ben’ and ‘Bebe’, were both of the northern form.

    They arrived at the zoo in 1955. ‘Ben’ was sent to Dvur Kralove in 1986; when ‘Bebe’ died she was replaced by the southern white rhino ‘Mashobeni’. (I believe she was eventually sent to Glasgow Zoo.)

    I well remember seeing the white rhinos in the old Deer & Cattle Sheds; their outside enclosure was roughly where the lion exhibit now is. (I also remember seeing the black rhinoceros ‘Lorna’ in the Deer and Cattle Sheds too – and before that in the old Antelope House.)

    As well as seeing ‘Ben’ countless times, I have been fortunate enough to see northern white rhinos in several other collections too; it is a sobering and depressing thought that I may never see another one.
     
    Last edited: 3 Feb 2014
  3. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    Another sad thing about the Carolina Parakeet: it might have survived in free-ranging populations in Europe. Among others, the German ornithologist Hans Freiherr von Berlepsch released several specimens at his estate in Thuringia in 1874; back then, the species was still quite common in the pet trade, although not really popular. Similar to the thriving current European populations of the Ring-necked Parakeet, this population appeared to adopt well to the local climate and was even reproducing. However, in 1876, all birds rapidly disappeared. Many decades later, von Berlepsch found out what had happened: a local landlord had shot them one by one within two days and zhad served them in his inn. The peculicar "gawking" behaviour of the Carolina Parakeet had made them an easy target. [The folloing link is written in German.]
    http://www.papageien.org/df/Df_al10_karolina.htm

    Kinda reminds me of that little fictious story about the late survival of the dodo in the Southern United States...
     
  4. Brum

    Brum Well-Known Member

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    Just out of interest has any establishment ever kept and bred the Baiji in captivity for any long periods of time? If so then that would have been a real last chance to save the species.
     
  5. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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  6. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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    @Brum: the English wikipedia article on the Baiji includes a list of all specimens kept in captivity since the 1980s, including the male specimen QiQi of "Last Chance to See" fame.
     
  7. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    I thought so. Named after Ben Lyon and Bebe Daniels from the 1950's comedy Radio/T.V. Show of the time- 'Life with the Lyons'.

    ZSL revived this tradition of naming animals after media people with the later black Rhino calves Esther(Rantzen) and Parky(Michael Parkinson). I think they may have done it with a few other animals too but can't remember the specifics.
     
    Last edited: 4 Feb 2014
  8. Batto

    Batto Well-Known Member

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  9. Brum

    Brum Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, I'll check it out once I'm back on my computer.
     
  10. vogelcommando

    vogelcommando Well-Known Member

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  11. Canihelpyou?

    Canihelpyou? Well-Known Member

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    Hello, who knows some extinct animals that zoos used to have in their collection. Im talking about used to, because im talking about completly extinct. Like the quagga in London zoo. So if anybody knows if zoos used to house animals that are now extinct (or back then), please tell me.
     
  12. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    London Zoo bred Passenger Pigeons early on. They also had Thylacine and Pink-headed Duck, neither of which has been reliably seen for many decades.
     
  13. The Speeding Carnotaurus

    The Speeding Carnotaurus Well-Known Member

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    I believe Cinncinati zoo has the last passenger pigeon. They have a memorial with its preserved body.
     
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  14. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    London Zoo had three quaggas in total; the one that died in 1872, and which can still be seen in the Edinburgh Museum, is the only living quagga known to have been photographed.

    London Zoo had twenty thylacines between 1850 and 1931.

    Amongst other now extinct animals, London Zoo also had both Syrian wild ass and bubal hartebeest. And it was probably the only zoo in the world ever to exhibit the now extinct Falkland Island "wolf"; with four specimens between 1845 and 1876.
     
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  15. Jurek7

    Jurek7 Well-Known Member

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    Interesting project for the zoo fans here would be to make a list of all extinct animals present in zoos.

    I will add one more: the Pink-headed Duck, which according to this website was in captivity until 1936. Somehow, the history of extinct and possibly extinct birds in captivity did not attract the same attention as large mammals.
    Oriental Bird Club Image Database : †?Pink-headed Duck » Rhodonessa caryophyllacea
     
  16. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    Alfred Ezra still kept them privately at his home Foxwarren Park in Surrey into the 1940's- 1944 springs to mind.
     
  17. Tim May

    Tim May Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Alfred Ezra's daughter Ruth used to have a lovely painting of one of her father's pink-headed ducks; I wonder what happened to it?
     
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  18. FBBird

    FBBird Well-Known Member

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    I may know; making enquiries.
     
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  19. Pertinax

    Pertinax Well-Known Member

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    I've seen(and handled) skins of them in the Bombay(Mumbai) Natural History Museum many years ago.
     
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  20. DDcorvus

    DDcorvus Well-Known Member

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    Rotterdam and Amsterdam zoo used to have Javan tigers on display. And many of the older European zoos had Barbary lions.